Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

See other formats


.'•VW 
r v.* - .-. i 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



Jr. 

4T 

m- 

*V 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Tuesday, April 5, 1994 



tribune. 


No. 34,554 


Angry North Koreans 
Snub UN ’s Demands 

Spuming Call to Open Sites , Regime 
Resumes 'Peaceful Nuclear Activity 9 


Herman PKUnc'*ecncc Fnsa-Pitvc 

— Rescue workers at Scbipho) Airport carrying victims J3. The plane, a turbo-prop bound for Cardiff, Wales, was carrying 21 passengers and a 

from a KLM airliner that crashed Monday, killing three people and seriously injuring crew of three. It developed engine trouble and crashed while returning to the airport 




^IF!FD 


South Africa’s Big Risk : Misjudging the Zulus 

country, dispatched by President Frederik W. de Klerk 
the blessing of his likely successor. Nelson Mandela, the 


By Bill Keller 

New York Times Service 

ISANDLWANA. South Africa — From the sphinx-shaped 
crag that gives this place its name, a vast amphitheater of 
yellow grass, drenched in blood and history, rolls east to a 
distant horizon. 

On a sunny January day in 1879, a British force of 1,800 
soldiers on their way to an anticipated easy conquest of 
Mainland looked up from this plain to see 20,000 Zulu warriors 
cascading down from the plateau. 

The field is still dotted with ihegraves of the British, buried 
where they were disemboweled. The mounds of white stones 
serve as little monuments to the folly of underestimating the 
Zulus. 

As South African soldiers undertake their own push into 


Zulu 

with the _ 
question in many minds is whether the Zulus are bang mis- 
judged again. 

Will this police action, intended to quell factional violence 
and protect voters in the country’s first post-apartheid elec- 
tion, turn into an attempted conquest of the Zulu royalists, the 
last major bastion of blade resistance to the new South Africa? 

And if so, what defiance win they encounter from the Zulu 
king, Goodwill Zweielhini, and his chief minister. Chief Man- 
gosuthu Buthelezi, men who revel in their martial heritage? 
How many of their divided subjects will rally to them? 

“What de Klerk and Mandela believe is that they are just 
going to drive tanks through tire Zulus,” said Gertrude Mzm,a 


leader in Buihelezi's Inkaiha Freedom Party but a non-Zulu, a 
hereditary princess of the Basotho tribe. 

“They are making a very big mistake." she said. “That is just 
going to create an England-IRA thing that is going to last for 
centuries.” 

Not so, countered Zibusc Mkba, a Zulu chief who supports 
the African National Congress. He said the ANG after win- 
ning the election, would find a way to settle with the king, and 
traditional Zulus would follow him into acquiescence. 

"At the end, he will give in,” Chief Mlaba predicted. “After 
the elections, the provincial government will accommodate the 
king. They wiD give him observer stems — let him sign bills 
after they are discussed in Parliament. They will set aside some 

See ZULUS, Page 4 


’.omeback 


It Isn’t a Panic, but Wall Street Keeps On Losing Points 


By Lawrence Malkin 

Intermaonol Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — The US . „ stock, market 
opened with a sharp thump Monday, but a 
weekend of reflection after Friday’s amp in 
interest rates prevented a panic scfl-on. 

Government data released Friday showing 
456,000 jobs created in the United Stales in 
March sent yields on government securities 
soaring. In late trading Monday, the yield on 
the benchmark 30-year Treasury bond rose to 
7.41 percent from 725 percent Friday, with the 
price plunging 1 21/32 at 86 5/32. 

The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 
64 points within 20 minutes of the opening bell 


and fell 80 points within the first Hoar. Cotn- 
. puterized program trading was halted for the 
morning. The blue chips climbed slowly bade 
' by midday, then stumped another 51 points to 
bring batik the program-trading limits. The 
Dow closed at 3.59335, down 42.61 and about 
TO percent bdow the record high of 3,97836 set 
in January. 

Still jittery about the Federal Reserve 
Board's next move on monetary policy, band 
investors shrugged off the National Association 
of Purchasing Management's report that 
showed industrial inflation moderating in 
March and overall activity in big companies 
stabilizing after a year-end rise that concerned 


the Fed The purchasing managers' index was 
5617 to Man*, only one-tenth of a point above 
Februar/sreading anda full point beto? Jajjtfc . 
ary and December. . . 

[President Bill Clinton said Monday the 
American people should not overreact to the 
stock market's drop, because the economy was 
fundamentally healthy and interest rates, while 
too high now, would turn down again. Renters 
reported from Cleveland. 

[“Interest rates are still lower than they were 
at the bottom of the recession,” Mr. Clinton 
said “I think they’re too high. 1 think they!! 
come hack down.' 1 ] 

Most of the selling in the stock market came 


from institutions fleeing to the safety of cash. 
Small companies were hammered hard The 
Jvfas.iaqjTidex f^UL i<L93_paints. to,X26.^3, — 
"There are a tut of bargain hunters looking 
for entry points, and in the context of last 
weeks' slide and this morning's carnage, we are 
entitled to some sort of bounce," said Michael 
Metz, market strategist at Oppenheuner & Co. 
“It is the small investors who are experiencing a 
combination of bewilderment and despair. 
Most of them can't understand why the market 
is going down in the face of such strong eco- 
nomic news.” 

Small investors mostly sat tight, although 

See MARKET, Page 12 


By David E. Sanger 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO — In an angry retort to the United 
Nations Securin' Council, North Korea on 
Monday rejected “unjustifiable demands” that 
it further open its nuclear sites, and said it now 
had no choice but to resume the “peaceful 
nuclear activities" it had frozen in place while 
negotiating with the Clin ion administration. 

The statement from the Foreign Ministry 
was the first since the Security Council issued a 
statement on Thursday asking the North to 
allow a full inspection of its nuclear facilities by 
the International Atomic Energy Agency. The 
statement, which was softened after long nego- 
tiations with China, the North's last ally, vague- 
ly hinted at the possibility of sanctions if 
Pyongyang failed to comply. 

It was unclear whether the North’s rejection 
of the resolution constituted the country’s last 
word on the subject. It appeared to allow some 
room to maneuvering, and both Japanese and 
South Korean diplomats said they held out 
some hope that North Korea would reconsider, 
and allow nuclear inspectors back into the 
country, after a series of events in Pyongyang 
over the next 10 days. 

Those events start with a meeting of the 
Communist nation's leadership later mis week 
and culminate, on April 15, with national cele- 
brations of the birthday of the country's so- 
called great leader, Kim D Sung. Mr. Kim, who 
has ruled North Korea since 1945, will ram 81 

If the North carried through on its threat to 
resume activity at its nuclear site at Yong- 
byong, 100 kilometers north of Pyongyang, it 
could move ahead with unloading spent nuclear 
fuel rods from its largest operating reactor. 

That long-delayed operation has been the 
cause of considerable concern within the Amer- 
ican intelligence community, because it would 
give the North access to a considerable amount 
of additional plutonium. The Central Intelli- 
gence Agency has estimated that the North 
already has enough plutonium to produce one 
or two bombs, but there are sharp differences of 
opinion in the United States and South Korea 
over whether North Korea already possesses a 
weapon. In Sand, to example, a senior South 
Korean official publicly expressed doubts 
about the American estimate. __ 

’"""’Any sign that the North was expanding its 
plutonium supplies would greatly change the 
nature of the Korean nuclear standoff for the 
Clinton administration. So far, it has justified 

and delayinjf^aarsher measures such as sanc- 
tions, by arguing that there is no evidence that 
North Korea is making significant progress in 
fabricating weapons while the talks drag on. 

“It would put a very different tint on things if 
it appeared they were making progress," an 
American official tracking the project said. 


“We would be forced to act on a different 
schedule." 

It is also possible that the North Korean 
statement was intended to justify new work 
within the reprocessing center, the core of the 
suspected nuclear sites, righted by inspectors 
who visited in March. The inspection team 
reported back to the UN agency that they saw 
some evidence that a second reprocessing line is 
under construction, which would potentially 
expand the North's ability to produce more 
plutonium. But a senior Smith Korean official 
suggested that the extra line may be more to 
show than for production, intended to strength- 
en the North's nuclear card “at very little cost.” 

In its lengthy attack on the Security Council, 
the North charged that the organization had 
been manipulated by the United States, and 
said that the atomic energy agency, a UN 
affiliate, would be called “to account to ex- 
panding partiality against us.” 

The UN inspectors left North Korea in mid- 
March without completing their work after au- 
thorities there blocked thorn from taking radio- 
active samples from a nuclear fuel reprocessing 
site. The samples likely would have offered 
evidence of how much plutonium, the key in- 
gredient in nuclear weapons, had been pro- 
duced at the plant 

Curiously, North Korea did not threaten to 
pull out of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty 
because of the Security Council action. Japa- 
nese officials, briefing reporters on their efforts 
to help defuse the North Korean standoff, said 
that a move to pull out of the treaty was “our 
nightmare scenario" because it could prompt 
immediate economic sanctions. 

Japanese officials made a public effort to 
step up pressure (Hi the North, but their wards 
seemed undercut by their private resistance to 
applying any pressure on the North in the 
absence of formal UN sanctions. 

“We are concerned that North Korea may 
not have understood very well the UN Security 


Ripple From Whitewater: 
Public Fears New Gridlock 




By Dan Balz 

Washington Pasi Service 

RACINE, Wisconsin — The American pub- 
lic believes that Washington is consumed with 
Whitewater — and they resent iu 

Americans may be skeptical of President Bill 
Ointon’s health care plan, anxious about vio- 
lent crime and alternately worried and hoptfiti 
about the economy. And not all are bullish 
about Mr. Clinton’s performance. 

But in interviews with Washington Post re- 
porters, they appear united on Whitewater; To 
most, it seems to be dther small potatoes or 
• ancient history, or both, 
t . The attention Whitewater has received and 
the sense of endless, partisan bickering oyer 
that and other issues in Washington have left 
■Americans feeling dgected abow jgng 
and fearful that government gridlock could 
once again paralyze the country. 

• “It’s Hke we’re coming down the road and 
coming to a V and going down the wrong 
fork," said Tom Terry, who runs a small refrig- 
eration company in Burlington, Wisconsin. 

. AS , mil security Officer * Nwtasfc, Nw 
York, put it, the situation m Washmgtonisas 
badasthe Civil War, what goes on between 
- Democrats and Republicans 

• “And every freshman class gets pounded 


down by the guys with seniority, so the voice of 
ihe people doesn’t get heard." 

A recent Washington Post-ABC News Poll 
found that, despite an improving economy, two 
out of three voters believe the country is off 
track. 

The poll found that while 76 percent of those 
surveyed say Mr. Clinton “has a vision for the 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

future erf the country," only 54 percent believe 
he is getting things done. That gap may reflect 
the pessimism people fed about bow dungs are 
working in Washington. 

Reporters to The Post spent pan of last 
week trading four House Democrats in Wiscon- 
sin, New York, North Carolina and California, 
and talking to their constituents during the 
spring recess. 

The public’s agenda is dominated by health 
care, and the lawmakers spent part of their time 
fielding questions about it at town meetings or 
touring senior citizen centers. 

Representative Maurice D. Hinchey, Demo- 
crat of New York, held a meeting in Newburgh, 
and 90 to 100 people turned out. Most had 
questions about health care, and after two 

See CLINTON, Page 4 






- — ' 


i-N • 


Kiosk 


The Clintons Head for Sports Pages 

*ssed £«S^C^«m 5- -tlB American Leagues first pitch, tmm flew 

hit solo to North Carolina to the finals of the 
day, then watmw ^ against NCAA basketball championship, featuring 

CT^York Mets-- tying m opeflingday his beloved Arkans^agSist Duke. Page 21. 


Books 

Chess 


Page 9. Crossword 

Page 9 , Weather 


Page 22. 
Page 21 


Cost Too Hi gh , Some Settlers Quit Gaza 



hcaadinc Aia/Thc AiWMied P» 

A Pales tinian woman pulling a boy away from an Israeli soldier who had wanted to 
arrest him Monday for throwing stones daring dashes in Jeridw on the West Bam, 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Pm Service 

DUGTT, Israeli-Occupied Gaza Strip — 
As the sun set over the Mediterranean, Mi- 
chal Htan, a 30-year-old Jewish settler, 
packed up her famihr and left the Gaza Strip, 
pitching a tent on the sand dunes just inside 
the border with Israel 

Tve had it up to here,” she said Monday, 
explaining why a dozen families from one of 
the smallest Jewish settlements in the Gaza 
Strip had suddenly left their community in 
the days before Palestinian seif-rule. 

“We had a dream, but the price became too 
high for this dream,” she said. “We felt we are 
no longer safe.” 

For the families of Dugit, it was a pragmat- 
ic move, demonstrating their feelings of vul- 
nerability, and fears for their personal securi- 
ty, in the midst of Gaza's convulsions. 

But it was also a highly symbolic move 
because the families of Dngit became the first 
Jewish settlement to voluntarily and publidy 
evacuate their community as Palestinian self- 
rule in the Gaza Strip and Hebron approach- 
es. 

They did what Jewish settlers in the heart 
of Hebron have vowed never to da 

Unlike the observant, ideological Jews who 
claim a biblical right to Kve in the center of 
Hebron, the families of Dugit said they had 
come to seek a better way of life. Thor 
decision to leave offers the most graphic 
example so far of the strains the Israel settle- 
ment movement is under. Settlers without 
strong ideological commitments are becom- 
ing toe first to look far shelter inside Israel. 

Last week, a Palestinian fired a shot at a 
resident of Dugit as he drove along the road 

See SETTLERS, Page 4 


with international nuclear safeguards,” said Ja- 
pan's chief cabinet secretary, Masayoshi Take- 
mura. 

But on Sunday, South Korea’s foreign minis- 
ter, Han Sung Joo, told his Japanese counter- 
part, Tsutomu Hata, that Japan might soon be 
asked to clamp down on the flow of hundreds 
of millions -of dollars from japan to North 
Korea. The river erf money, anywhere from 
5600 million to $ 1.6 billion a year, is the 
North's chief source of bard currency. 

Japan has been highly reluctant to act in the 
absence of a Security Council resolution impos- 
ing economic sanctions, even though vigorous 
enforcement of Japan's existing laws on the 
transfer of money would likely narrow the pipe- 
line of cash. 

The Japanese officials repeated their pledge, 
however, to cut the funds off as soon as the 
Security Council enacted economic sanctions. 


Islamic Revolt 
Pushes Algeria 
Near Civil War 


By Youssef M. Ibrahim 

New York Tima Service 

PARIS — The armed forces defending Alge- 
ria's military government, and the Islamic fun- 
damentalists fighting to overthrow it, are split- 
ting into waning dins of diminishing loyalty, 
pushing the North African nation of 28 mfflion 
-people closer to a full-fledged civil war, say 
Algerians who make frequent trips to France or 
who have fled here. 

Algerians active in politics assert that, as the 
death toll for foreigners and citizens rises, the 
daily armed confrontations between funda- 
mentalists and authorities are turning into a 
free-for-all where various armed groups are 
adopting their own political agendas and ua'ng 
force to support their views. 

k We are slipping toward a Kabul-like scenar- 
io, where the Afghans are shooting at each 
other and everyone else,” Said Saadi leads- of 
the Assembly for Democracy and Culture, a 
vehemently secularist political opposition par- 
ty, said in an interview in Paris. 

In the past few weeks Algerians involved in 
politics, including former prime ministers and 
current officials, have multiplied their visits to 
Paris to seek counsel, refuge and help from 
France. 

Thousands of Algerians have been pouring 
into France over the last several days, and a 
substantial number of the families of the ruling 
elite have already moved to France. 

Foreigners — the largest contingent is 

See ALGERIA, Page 4 


Miracle in Moscow as Western Goodies Hit Market 


stratospheric prices. Almost weekly, the expatriate grapevine 
lights up with news of another miracle — Pop Tarts have, 
appeared, or balsamic vinegar, or frozen waffles or even the 
American cat liner. 


None of this is to say that life in Moscow has become a stroll 
to the maJL “This is still not utopia,” says Jeffrey M.Zdger, a 


* 


u»w/sstqnd Prices. 


Andorra.. 
Antilles — 
Cameroon. 
Egypt — 
France.... 
Gabon...... 

Greece 

Ivory Coast 
Jordan..— 
Lebanon .. 


-9.00 FF 
,11.20 FF 
.I.4D0CFA 
E. P-5000 
...9.00 FF 
..960 C FA 

,..J30Q Dr. 
,1.120 CFA 

..—1 JD 

..US$1 JO 


LuxemboorgiOl-Fr 
Mo rocco ........ 12 Dn 

Qatar .8.00 Rials 

Reunion— -U JO FF 
Saudi Arabia -9.00 R- 
Senegal— 960 CFA 
sSi^-- 200 PTAS 
Tunisia .... 1.000 Dm 
Turkey ..T.L. 15^000 

U.A.E .8J0Dirh 

U.S. Mil. (Eur.) 51.10 


Dow Jones 


i rib Index 





Maw Yort- 

Mon.CS«B 

- previous dott 

DM 

1.6955 

1.698 

Pound 

1.4665 

14735 

Yen 

103.145 

103.675 

FF 

5.7956 

5.7936 


By Maigaret Shapiro 

Washington Pan Service 

MOSCOW — Two days after the American Bar and Grill 
opened with a hamburger-and-ribs menu designed to soothe 
the longings of the expatriate, every table was fuD from 2 

SassasasEW skss ssasswsff- 1 --* 1 - 

theTex^fex bar The Moscow Times daily newspaper, the Indeed, to someoneaccustomed to life in the West, Moscow 

roc loi-mcA , .. .# — • atirf is still a hardship post. Coops, tank battles, diphtheria epidem- 

ics, mafia shoot-outs, uncontrolled crime and grime, firing 
ultranationalism and haywire inflation make daily life a nerve- 
racking challenge. 

But the change in Moscow is such that newcomers must 
endure tales of the bad old days from those who came as 
recently as three years ago, days when foreigners were still 
stuck in government-designated ghettos, lettuce was a rarity 
and there was a choice of eating at horrible restaurants with 
bad service or bad restaurants with horrible service. 


ATItCilLdll iiinuiai LUlilU UIW a . • 

Any thing else that caters to Moscow’s burgeoning American 

community. . , , 

Moscow was once an exotic locale that attracted ( only a 
hardy few, mostly diplomats and jou rnalists , 
enforced isolation, shopped at the few mens* taQPVjMty 
stores and traveled abroad lo buy unfed, timet paper, peanut 
butler, cranberry juice and other American staples. 

Today, this city has become an expat boomiowruwith 
services and stores unimaginable only months ago, albeit at 


“Basically, any foreigner who has been here more than two 
years can wax poetic about how hard it was then and how easy 
it has become now, that’s how quickly it has changed,” says 
Michael Hetzcr. Mr. Hetzer, who has been here since 1990, is a 
columnist to an English-language drily, The Moscow Times, 
itself less than two years old. 

He change can be traced fairly directly to the collapse of the 
Soviet Union in 1991 and the subsequent introduction of a 
free-market economy by a Russian government committed to 
integration with the West. Foreign and Russian entrepreneurs 
quickly found the one group with money to spend— foreigners 
— ana began setting up dollar-only stores and services to 
attract them. A few tiny food markets opened, some dothing 
stores, a computer store, an American-run hotd with a cappuc- 
cino bar. 

Soon the flood of foreigners into Russia began, swelling to 
100,000 today by some estimates. At first they remained 

See EXPATS, Page 4 


ir- 

a's 

dv 

gh 

ly, 

u- 

■er 

:al 

ks 

■er 

JL 

*> 

ii- 


UL 

of 


or 

■ial 

ue 

es 

;5. 

o- 


ip_ 

in 


aJ 

of 

.te 

or 

nt 

m 

(is 

d, 

al 

d. 

>rt 

in 

b- 

ac 

in 

n- 

al 

u, 

n- 

ry 

s- 

s- 

3- 

V, 

at 

■s 

to 

e, 

te 

e. 

!- 

ie 

i- 

tt 

£ 

*■ 

I- 

e 

s 





■Page 2 


HVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL S, 1994 


Serbs Said to Close In on Gorazde 


SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzego- 
wna — Serbian faces broke 
through the Muslim front line 
along the southern edge of the 
besieged Bosnian enclave of Gor- 
azde on Monday, Sarajevo radio 
said. 

The Muslim-controlled radio 
said a number of villages had 
been overrun, causing many casu- 
alties, while other villagers fled 
toward the town of Gorazde it- 
self. 

There was no immediate con- 
firmation of the report from the 
United Nations, which has mili- 
tary observers in Gorazde. 

The radio described the situa- 
tion as “dramatic" and said Ser- 
bian artillery fire bad intensified 
at around 7 PJVL 

Earlier, the commander of UN 
troops in Bosnia, Sir Michael 
Rose of Britain, said he planned 
to visit the enclave, winch has 
been under Serbian attack for the 
past week, to assess the situation. 

Lieutenant General Rose told 
reporters after meeting that the 
Bosnian Serbian leader, Radovan 
Karadzic, at his headquarters at 
Pale, near Sarajevo, that he would 
go to Gorazde on Wednesday. 

“We both agreed we needed 
more accurate reports” from 
Gorazde, be said, and “we intend 
to increase the number erf UN- 
MOS," or UN military observers. 

Speaking at the weekend. Gen- 
eral Rose said he doubted the 
Serbs had the capability to over- 
run Gorazde. 

UN officials in Sarajevo said 
the Bosnian Serbs bad refused to 
allow more military observers 
into Gorazde, which is supposed 
to be a “safe haven" under UN 
protection. 

Major Rob Annin t r, a UN mili- 
tary spokesman, said Serbian ar- 
tillery and tank fire hit the town 
and the front lines on Sunday. A 
civilian was killed and a soldier in 
the Muslim-led army and four 
civilians were wounded in the 
fighting, be said at a news brief- 
ing in Sarajevo. 

Major Anrnnk said the UN 
Protection Force had suspended 
its plan to send more mili tary 
observers to reinforce the present 
four-man team in Gorazde be- 
cause the Serbs endrehng the en- 
clave had refused to allow them 
passage. 

The Serbs, he said, had told the 
UN forces that they should delay 
sending in the observers because 
of “Muslim offensives and vari- 


ous combat activities” in eastern 
Bosnia, including Gorazde. 

Apart from the military ob- 
servers, the international pres- 
ence in Gorazde, where 65,000 
people are trapped, is limited to a 
handful ol aid workers. 

Amid reports of the deteriora- 
tion in Gorazde, the Internation- 
al Committee of the Red Cross 
suspended plans for imm ediate 
evacuation of thousands of Mus- 


lims and Croats front Pryedor in 
northern Bosnia after Mr. Karad- 
zic placed drastic limits on the. 
number of people he would allow 
to go, a Red Cross official said 
Monday. 

The Red Cross delegation chid 
in Bosnia, Andreas Kuhn, said in 
Sarajevo that Mr. Karadzic said 
he was ready to let leave most 
people whose lives were really un- 
der threat, but that this would not 


mean the Red Cross should evac- 
uate thousands of people. 

“So at the end of these vary 
extensive talks, we did not agree 
on the crirnin to be applied," Mr. 
Kuhn said. 

The Red Gross had planned to 
evacuate non-Serbs from the Pri- 
jedor area following reports that 
up to 20 Muslims and Croats had 
been killed in a new outbreak of 
ethnic violence. 



TOGETHER AT EASTER — Avakmn Rosio, die only Orthodox priest still in Sarajevo, kissing 
the cross of the city's Roman Catholic archbishop, Vinko Pufic, at an Easter Monday reception at 
the archbtsbop’s residence. Die head mufti of the Bihac-area Muslims, Hasan Makio, looked on. 


Croatian Serbs Think the Unthinkable 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Past Service 

KNIN, Croatia — Lazar Matsnra has all 
the mak i n gs of an ultranationalist He lives in 
this region of barren hills, poor soil and high 
illiteracy, a hotbed of the Serbian Radical 
Party, which is one of the most extremist 
groups in what used to be Yugoslavia. 

For four years he has worked as an ideo- 
logue and a politician in Serbian-held Croatia 
and has played an important role in the 
establishment of the self-proclaimed Serbian 
Republic of Krajina. That's why Mr. Mat- 
sura’s new message seems so unusual 

Sitting in a dim caffe in this capital of the 
breakaway Serbian state, Mr. Matsura states 
that he and many other Serbs living in this 
rural backwater would be willing to end their 
struggle against the Croatian government 
and accept its rule. 

“If the Croatian government grants us 
equal rights, we could live as citizens of 
Croatia," said the former PngHsh teacher, 
who heads the parliamentary committee on 
foreign affairs for the self-styled Serbian Re- 
public 

“If Croatia could be something like Cana- 
da, where Goats, Serbs. Africans, Chinese 
and everybody else lives together, that wonld 
be wonderful.” 

Mr. Matsura’s professed moderation is be- 
coming more common here. 

But these days, the 300,000 people estimat- 
ed to inhabit this region are feeling more 
isolated than usual in their rocky mountain 
villages. A Balkans peace plan being pushed 


by the United States and Russia has placed 
them on the auction block and chances are 
increasing that the Krajina Serbs win be 


abandoned by President Slobodan Milosevic 
of Serbia in exchange for a chunk of Serbian- 
controlled Bosnia and an end to international 
economic sanctions against Yugoslavia, 
which now consists of Serbia and Montene- 
gro. 

Just four months ago, Mr. Matsura was 
winning a seal in Krajina’s parliament on a 
campaign of “no defeat, no surrender” to the 
Croatian government. Today, he talks about 
accommodation with Croatia and speaks of 
reunification almost as inevitable. 

“We must learn to live with the Goats." he 
said. “Of course, we’d rather join our broth- 
ers in Serbia, but if that’s impossible, we 
really have no choice." 

His turnabout highlights an important 
point about recent negotiations in the Bal- 
kans, bringing the area doser to peace than it 
has been since the war in Croatia erupted in 
1991. While nationalism has been the domi- 
nant creed in the conflicts, fa many of the 
politicians it has been a tool to secure a 
stranglehold on power. If no longer useful, it 
could be tossed on the region's junk pile of 
used ideologies. 

This phenomenon was illustrated most re- 
cently by Knyina’s sworn enemy. President 
Franjo Tudjman of Croatia. In less than six 
weeks, Mr. TUdjman abandoned his plan to 
carve out a Croatian-controlled chunk of 
Bosnia and facilitated the renewed alliance of 
Croatian and Muslim factions there. 

As with Mr. Matsura, Mr. Tudjman did 
not appear to undergo a conversion; indeed, 
both men emphasized they had not changed 
their beliefs. They were simply bending with 
the prevailing winds. In the last weeks, pres- 
sure has increased on political leaders such as 


Mr. Matsura and others to prepare fa a 
diplomatic solution to the problem in Serbi- 
an-controlled regions of Croatia. 

Last week in the Russian Embassy in Za- 
greb, Croatian and Serbian negotiators con- 
cluded a cease-fire agreement, due to take 
effect this week, that would set the stage for a 
resumption of trade and transportation links 
between the two sides fa the first time in four 
years. If these links are re-established, UJS. 
and Russian diplomats say, a political solu- 
tion could follow quickly. 

United Nations officials say Serbian offi- 
cials are hinting that sane type of arrange- 
ment with Croatia will be possible under 
which Krajina recognizes Croatia’s sover- 
eignty over the region. 

The region's president. Mile Manic, has 
informed a senior UN official in the area, for 
example, that a plan to grant Kxajina signifi- 
cant autonomy could possibly be accepted, 
the official said. 

“Before, they used to say, “Never. We will 
fight to the last child,’ ” die UN official said. 
“Now we are bearing a different jargon. 
There’s more talk of compromise and deals." 

■ Rivals Foil Rack Weapons' 

The Croatian Army and opposing Serbian 
forces began pulling back heavy weapons 
Monday under a cease-fire agreement aimed 
at formally aiding their 1991 war, The Asso- 
ciated Press reported from Zadar, Croatia. 

The agreement is considered a step toward 
ending the war in neighboring BosmarHerze- 
govina by isolating Bosnia’s Serbs and put- 
ting additional pressure on them to accept a 
peace settlement 


No UN Status for Russia’s Ex-Soviet Peacekeeping 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — The United Nations secretary- 
general. B litres Butros Ghali, met with Presi- 
dent Boris N. Yeltsin on Monday to discuss 
peacekeeping in the former Soviet Union and 
Yugoslavia. 

On the eve of the Kr emlin meeting, Mr. 
Butros Ghali ruled out giving Russian troops 
the status of UN peacekeepers in such former 
Soviet republics as Georgia and Tajikistan, 
which are riven by fi ghting . 


“It is impossible," Mr. Butros Ghali said in 
an interview on Russia's new Independent 
Television network, “since the UN cannot con- 
duct a peacekeeping operation if it was not 
involved in it since the very be ginning ." 

However, be said Russia either could con- 
tribute troops to UN-led peacekeeping opera- 
tions in the former Soviet Union a could 
continue its own peacekeeping efforts alongside 
an independent UN force. 


6 More Are Linked WORLD BRIEFS 

To Mexican Killing Somalis Free Abducted Aid Worker 

C7 u/vzinictni ‘Somalia /APt — An American Red Cross worker 



By Tod Robberson 

Washington Past Senior 

MEXICO CITY — The Mexican 
government said Monday, that sev- 
eral individuals conspired in the 
March 23 assassination of Luis 
Doualdo Colosio, the ruling party's 
presidential candidate, and that 
more than one gunman apparently 
was involved. 

The government’s special inves- 
tigator m the assassination, Migud 
Montes Garcia, announced that at 
least six individuals awitTwi the ac- 
cused gunman, Mario Aburto Mar- 
tinez, in carrying out the kfllmg 
while Mr. Colosio was campaign- 
ing in the border city of Tijuana. 
Two of them remain at large. 

Mexican press reports have iden- 
tified sane of the alleged accom- 
plices as members of a security de- 
tail. Foot alleged conspirators 
already have bon arrested, Mr. 
Montes said Monday. 

The government still has not 
identifral a motive. As c andidate 
of the rating Institutional Revolu- 
tionary Party, which has not lost a 
presidential election since 1929, 
Mr. Colosio’s decaon to the presi- 
dency was virtually assured. 

Videotapes and photographs re- 
leased since March 23 show several 
individuals conversing with Mr. 
Aburto before the shooting; hdp- 
ing dear a path through snppoters 
around the candidate timing a 
campaign rally, and finally block- 
ing Mr. Colosio’s security guards so 


that Mr. Aburto could get close to 
the candidate. 

Photos show a man identified as 
Mr. Aburto placing a pistol directly 
to the back of Mr. Colosio’s bead 
and firing once, fatally injuring 
farm. A second shot was fired into 
Mr. Colosio’s abdomen, and al- 
though investigators originall y said 
the bullet came from Mr. Aburto’s 
JS-caHber pistol, enough evidence 
has surfaced to suggest that a sec- 
ond gnmnan may nave fired h. 

Mr. Montes did not say whether 
the second gunman, who remains 
unidentified and at large, actually 
fired his gim before escaping. 

He identified Jose Rodolfo Riva- 
palario as the organizer erf the 
group. According to the weekly 
magazine Proceso, Mr. Rivapalario 
is a member of the ruling party’s 
municipal political council in Ti- 
juana and a former chief homicide 
investigator fa the judicial police 
of Baja California, Tijuana’s state. 

According to Mr. Montes, at 
least two otho-posons — Tranqui- 
Eno Sanchez Venegas and Vicente 
Mayoral Valenzuela — are in cus- 
tody on suspicion of helping push 
back crowd members and open, a 
path fa Mr. Aburto. 

Mr. Mayoral’s son, Rodolfo 
Mayoral Esquer, also is under ar- 
rest Mr. Montes said the son’s job 
was to “push and hinder the ac- 
tions" of a Mexican Army colonel 
who was one of Mr. Colosio’s 
bodyguards. 


French Surrender 
To Outraged Vets 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Ceding to an interna- 
tional onlay, the French govern- 
ment said Monday that h would 
not requisition hotel rooms booked 
by veterans fa the 50th annivasa- 
iy of the Normandy landings. 

A Foreign Ministry spokesman, 
Richard Duque, said die veterans’ 
reservations wonld be “honored as 
planned." 

Canadian veterans were said to 
be “spitting Wood" over the issue, 
and one group of French veterans 
complained that the affair “shows 
the incurable contempt of the 
princes who govern us toward com- 
mon mortals." 

The newspaper Le Monde said 
the anger of tine veterans was un- 
derstandable, given that they had 
helped liberate France and that 
many of their comrades had died 
on its beaches. 

Le Monde said the government’s 
authoritarian manner of “brutally" 
annnfling the reservations had cast 
a note of bitterness over the com- 
memoration. 

Mr. Duque insisted that “there is 
no polemic and no problem.” 

“There was a certain degree of 
agitation but the news that got out 
did not correspond to the truth," he 
said. 

The management of the H6ld 
Royal and the H5tel du Golf in 
Deauville stuck to their stay that 
they had been ordered to set aside 
rooms reserved by the veterans to 
make way for visiting royalty and 
dignitaries. 

The regional administration of 
Calvados, where most of the D-day 
beaches are situated, had said earli- 
er that “some veterans will in effect 
be moved from the hotel where 


they had planned to stay in Deau- 


said their reservations had been 
made two years ago and had been 
accompanied by deposits. 

The veteran’s representatives 
said they had been told they were 
to be lodged in private homes, 
which wonld defeat their objective 
of a reunion in the same place. 

The Canadian ambassador to 
France; Benoit Bouchard, said his 
government had been “surprised 
and even disappointed" to learn 
that the reservations had been can- 
celed. “We hope there will be no 
repetition of this kind of incident 
before June 6," he said. “The veter- 
ans are the heroes of this celebra- 
tion." 

Mr. Duque, asserting that there 
was “no question of jeopardizing 
the reservations," said that France 
would “welcome and honor in the 
best conditions all those who 
fought fa its freedom." 

A former British paratrooper, 
Angus Cross, 69, who reserved 
rooms at the H5td du Golf fa 
more than 100 Canadians, said that 
the veterans were “spitting blood" 
over reports of the cancellations. 

“It’s a right dog’s dinner but we 
have a legally binding contract and 
we're going in guns blazing," he 
said. 

Mr. Duque was asked whether 
the dignitaries, rather than the vet- 
erans, would be billeted on the lo- 
cal populace. “Of course not," he 
replied. 

But he did not say what woedd be 
done to solve the problem of enra- 
mous overcrowding at the June 
commemoration, which is sched- 
uled to be attended by at least 15 
heads of state and government. 


U.S. Court Takes Up 
Frequent-Flier Suits 


Russia wants its troops in Georgia, Tajiki- 
stan and other former Soviet republics to be 
granted the status of United Nations “blue 
helmets" but to remain under Moscow’s com- 
mand. Russia also has urged the West to help 
pay for its peacekeeping efforts. 

So far, the United Nations has refused those 

tiomfare undertaken by mdtinationaf forces 
from neutral countries and the troops are under 
UN command. 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Su- 
preme Court agreed on Monday to 
decide whether people upset over 
new restrictions m an amine’s fre- 
quent-flier program may sue in 
state courts fa monetary damages. 

The justices said they would hear 
an appeal by American Airlines 
that says that allowing such law- 
suits “threatens the economic star 
bility of the airline industry.” 

The minds Supreme Coart ruled 
that the airline amid be sued over 
alleged violations of fffinou con- 
tract law and the state’s Consumer 
Fraud and Deceptive Business 
Practices Act 

Some participants in American's 
frequent-flier program, suing in be- 
half of all 4 milli on participants, 
challenged various restrictions the 
airline imposed when it retroactive- 
ly modified the program in 1988. 


Lawyers fa American contend 
that a US. law, the Airline Deregu- 
lation- Act of 1978, precludes such 
state court lawsuits. 

The lawsuit challenged Ameri- 
can’s change of policy on the num- 
ber of seats on particular flights set 
aside for frequent-flier members 
and its practice of “blacking out" 
dates on which free or discounted 
flights were not available. 

The justices in 1992 told the Illi- 
nois Supreme Court to restudy its 
initial aetison to allow the lawsuit 

Hie nation’s highest court said 
the restudy should be based on its 
ruling in a Texas case that bars 
stales from regulating airline fare 
advertising. That decision said it is 
the U-S. government's job to make 
sure that air travelers are not 
duped. 

After restudying the case, the Il- 
linois S u p re me Court last Decem- 
ber again allowed the lawsuit 


MOGADISHU. Somalia ( AP) — An American Red Cross worker was 
released unhar med on Monday by Somali gunmen who had abducted 
him after killing his security guard. j 

Alfred Fetters, 37, had been kidnapped by op to 15 gunmen who , . 
stopped his vehicle on Thursday a few hundred meters from a United j' 
Nations checkpoint and killsd his guard, who was nding in a second car. 
Suzanne Hofstetter, the head of the International Committee of the Reck 1 . . 
Cross in Somalia, said no ransom had been paid fa his release. w ; 

Paris May Sell Submarines to Mdstan !- 

NEW DELHI (Reuters) — Foreign Minister Alain Juppi said Monday ,• 
that France was holding talk* with Islamabad on selling French subma- 1 
rises to Pakistan. 

“Yes, we are having discussions” on the proposed sale to Pakistan, be 
said in an interview during an offidal visit to the Indian capital He 
declined to identify the submarines France cook! $eQ to Pakistan. India ! 
has fought three wars with Pakistan since both countries became inde- ]• 
pendent from Britain in 1947. 

Indian officials said (he proposed sale would strain relations with f 
France. “Any sale of submarines to Pakistan would raise the already high ! 
temperature very drastically," an Indian diplomat said. “We don’t bdieve 
anyone supplying them to Pakistan is truly working fa peace." 

Zhirinovsky Name Change Is Found / 

ALMA-ATA, Kazakhstan (AP) — Public records show that Vladimir 
V. Zhirinovsky, the Russian nationalist leader who campaigns on anti- 
Semitic themes, had a Jewish last name until age 18. 

Mr. Zhirinovsky vehemently denies that he is Jewish. His origins have 
political significance in Russia because of his attacks on Jews. His Liberal 
Democratic Party won 23J percent of the national vote in Decembers 
parliamentary elections, and much of his political strength rests On 


parliamentary elections, and much of his political strength rests on 
extreme natio nalis ts who are virulently anti-Semitic. 

The public records were found by a reporter woriang for The Associat- 
ed Press and CNN in four archives here, where Mr. Zhirinovsky was bom 
and raised. Although the records do not say specifically who his father 
was, bis surname listed on his birth registration is Edefahtein. Docu- 
ments show be applied fa and received pemtisskm to change he name 
from Qddshtein to Zhirinovsky in June 1964. 


India State Leader Survives Assault 

NEW DELHI (AP) — The leader of India’s most populous state 
survived an assassination attempt Monday by a man who tried to stab J 
him, a news agency reported. m \ 

Mulayara Singh Yadav, chief minister of Uttar Pradesh stale in p. 
northern India, was attacked daring a public meeting at his residence in !•* - 
Lucknow, United News of India said. The assailant rose from a chair as 
Mr. Yadav walked past, grabbed him by the neck and began polling a 
knife out of his pocket, it said. Two security guards overpowered the 
attacker. Mr. Yadav, who fell, suffered only a scratch. 

The assailant was identified as Vasant Telang, 21, from Pune, in the 
western state of Maharashtra. The city is a stronghold of Shiv Sena, a u 
fundamentalist Hindu group allied with the Bharatiya Janata Party; 
which lost U ctar Pradesh to Mr. YadaVs coalition in elections last year. *" 

Angola Rebels Cut Power to Capital . | - 

LISBON (AP) — The Angolan capital, Luanda, was without electricity j 
and low on drinking water Monday after rebels of the National Union for I-', 
the Total Independence of Angola knocked out high-power lines. j V 

The attack on the fines between the capital and a major power station 7- 
in Cambambe to the southeast came as peace talks in T-naka, Zambia; - 
appeared stalled and the United Nations Security Council prepared tp 7 
discuss further sanctions against (he rebel group, known by its acronym 7, 
in Portuguese, UN IT A. 

The Portuguese news agency Lusa cited Angolan mili tary officials as 
saying the rebels had closed in on areas southeast of Luanda over the !’ 
weekend, sabolaging the lines and occupying the towns Zenza de Itambfc ; 

and Maria Terese between Luanda mid Cambambe. The rebels last r 
carried out a major sabotage attack against the capital in January 1993, 
just before both sides abandoned the last round of peace talks and 
mobilized for all-out war. 


TRAVEL UPDATE . 

A1 Aqsa Mosque Will Reopen to All 

JERUSALEM (Reuters) — Muslim authorities have decided to reopen 
the A1 Aqsa Mosque, Islam’s fluid holiest site, to non-Muslims and 
tourists banned following the Hebron massacre; an official of the Waqf, 
or Islamic Trust, said on Monday. 

The official said that the Waqf barred non-Muslims from enterin g the 
mosque in March in protest at the alleged infringement of freedom of 
worship by police officers who limited the ages and numbers of worship-, 
ers who could enter. He said the closing was also a condemnation of the 
killing by a Jewish settler of more than 30 Palestinian worshipers in a 
Hebron mosque in late February. 

More than 15,000 Athens taxi drivers began a two-day strike over a 
proposed tax of 200,000 drachmas ($800) a year that would be added to 
the current Greek income tax. (AP) 

A hotel fire In Amman kflled at least one guest, an Italian tourist, and 
injured 15 people: An employee of the Forte Grande Hold said a British 

r had died af to - jumping from a second-story window to escape the 
but the British Embassy and security o fficials contradicted the 
employee's report The general manager of the hotel said the blaze might 

have been caused try a cigarette tossed onto the carpet in the lobby. (AP) 

The Warsaw airport control tower was dosed fa seven hoars, and 
hundreds of flights were delayed or diverted, because of damage to 
communications lines caused by heavy rain. (Reuters) 


Now, Russia’s Defense Chief 
Signs Onto NATO Program 

Reuters 

MOSCOW — Defense Minister Pavel S. Grachev confirmed 
Monday that Russia planned to sign up fa NATO’s Partnership fa 
Peace program this month, and he denied suggestions of a split in the 
Kre mlin over the issue. 

He told the Itar-Tass press agency that he and Foreign Minister 
Andrei V. Kozyrev had sent the appropriate documents to President 
Baris N. Yeltsui, who had given his support to the proposal. 

“We hope Andrei Kozyrev will sign a framework agreement in 
Brussels in April at Russia’s joining the Partnership fa Peace 
program,” General Grachev stud alter meeting in Moscow with 
Secretary-General Butros Butros Ghali erf the United Nations. 

“On the whole I do not see any disagreement in the government 
and presidential structures on this question," General Grachev said. 

Fourteen countries Iran the former Soviet Woe have signed the 
{rartnet&hip deal, a program of joint exercises ami military coopera- 
tion between NATO members and their former adversaries. 

Moscow sent out sharply contrasting signals last week about the 
East-West military cooperation plan, confusing the Western alli- 
ance. Mr. Yeltsin's spokesman, Vyacheslav Kostikov, first said that 
Russia amid take six a seven months to make a derision on 
whether tojoin. Mr. Kozyrev said later that Mr. Kostikov might have 
been misunderstood and that Russia would sign up this month. 


To call from country to country, or back to the US., dial the WorldPhone number of the country you're calling from. 


Antigua 

(Available From public card phones only } #2 






Argentina* 

AustrialCCl* 

BahamastCO 

Rahr»lri 

Belgium ICO* 
Bermuda 4- 
Botivtg* 

Brazil 

fanniia 

Cayman Islands 
ChiWCCl 
Colombia! CO* 
Costa Rica* 


001-800-333-1111 
022-90 3-012 
1-800-621-1000 
800-002 
0800-10012 
1 -800-623-0484 
0-800-2222 
000-8012 
1-800-888-8000 
1-800-621-1000 
00 V -03 16 
980-16-0001 
162 



Cyprus* 

Czech Repub li etc Ci 
DenmarktCCH 
Dominican Republic 
Ecuador* 

Egypt icc)+ 

(Outside of Cairo, dial 
El Salvador* 

Finland!, CO* 

F nmcet GO* 

Gambia* 
GennnytCO 
t Limited availability m 
GreeceiCQ* 

Grenada 4- 


080-90000 
00-42-0001 12 
8001-0022 
1-800-751-6624 
170 

02 rust.) 355-5770 
195 

9800-102-80 
19V-00-19 
00-1-99 
0I3(W>012 
astern Germany.) 

00-800-1211 

1-800-624-8721 


Haiti (CO-*- 
Honduras 4- 
HnngaryVCO* 
Iceland* 

IrdandlCO 

IsracKCCT 

ItalytCO* 

Jamaica 

Kenya 

(Available from most 

LiccbiensteiolCCX* 

Luxembourg 

Mexico*. 

MonacotCO* 


189 

001-800-444-1234 
001-800-674-7000 
OOV -800-01411 
999-002 
1-800-55-1001 
177-150-2727 
172-1022 
800-674-7000 


major cities ) 


cs ) 080011 

155-0222 
0800-0112 
95-800-674-7000 
1 9V -00-1 9 


l GCl Coumry^TK^nmiry ulbngavaiiWc. May not iv available uvfrom afi lmrmaJorui kwthms. Cnufn 
irslnvthnB apply. 4 Lbnhccl awlbhdhv. ▼ Wan for uxund did lone. A Available Inim LADA TEL 
puMk- phi mis ink. talc depends tm call cflflta nt Mcn.n t International nrnmiinkaikinstsracr. 

* I** awlbhk fmm [whin: pay phenes. ♦ Puhik: phemes may nxjufir dcpi-ai ft unn <e fiUmc tart kr ital amc 


NetherfamdstCO* I 

Netherlands AntilkstCCH- 001- 

NicantgnaiCO 

(Outside of Managua, dial 02 first.) 
NortrayfCO* 

Panama 
Military Bases' 

Paraguay -r 

Perot Oiasuie of Lima, dial 190 first.) 

Poland! CO 0V-0] 

Portugal CO 


06-022-91-22 

001-800-950-1022 


Puerto Rico.CC i 
San ManuKCO* 
Slovak Republic i CO 
South Allied CO 


first. ) 166 

800-19912 
108 

2810-108 
008-11-800 
fnsO 001-190 

OV-0 1-04-800-222 
05-017-1234 


1 -8CH>:s6d-20i.O 
172-1022 
00-42-000 1 12 
0800-99-001 1 


5 paint CO 900-99-0014 

5l Lada 191-997-0001 

Sweden tCO* 020-795-922 

SwltzeriandlCO* 1550222 

Trinidad St Tobagp 
(SPECIAL PHONES ONLY? 

United UngdonrfCQ 

Tb rail die U-S using BT 0800-890222 

lo call the LIS. using MERCURY 0500090-222 
To call anywhere other than the 115.0300-800-800* 
Uruguay IXXM12 

U-S- Virgin UkndstCO 1 -800-888-8000 

Vatican City (CO 172-1022 

Venezuela -H> 800-1 1 14-0 


0800-89-0222 

0500-990-222 


Let It Take You Around the World. 

X. y Front MCI 



Imprime par Offprint. 73ruede I’Evemgik. 75018 Paris. 




V 










'JSefs 




THE_ AME RICAS / 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 5,1994 


Page 3 


F T ' t "' IF* 

ft- ftr-atj, 




: r>isis 




L 

fringe ]« p 

r ~-rr - ^ l££(V 

rjnV'X 

;***^23^ 

'- . . V»cv 


i: 


jn ^A^ 

" ,4 “ * m ^c 


■r • «- •■' v- : 


°we r to Capiy 

: : ■ : 4 ’ 




political notes 


Wan Wight Sun" 

A 1 ™ f®?® of State James 

Hotair 3d 1 IUUng 0Ularun for the White 

J2?£ iSF' 1 dedded **“ going to run, I 
haven i deaded I m not going to nm,” he said in an 
m^jcwwiUi the Houston Posl “I have » dS“ 
flS ^ 10 ^ a good ponion of 

idr. B^cer, who will turn 64 this month, held iod 
posts in three Republican administrations. He *£ 
White House chief of staff for both Ronald Rea- 

gm and G^rgc Bush. “I know better than most 
what’s involved," he said. 

Mr. Baker said he had spent a year “laying low” 
^ movmg back to his native Houston from 
Recently, he has criticized President 
BUI Qmton on foreign policy, crime, health care 
and die economy. He also has started making 
rounds of the country, helping Republicans raise 
money and possibly amassing some political chits 
of his own. Jjpj 

Hard-Boiled White House Fun 

WASHINGTON — Thousands of children 
trampled across the White House lawn Monday to 
roll hard-boiled eggs and catch a glimpse of Presi- 
dent Clinton and Hillary Rodham Cfinton. They 
also got a chance to see the Easter bunnv and hunt 
for colorful wooden eggs signed by the president 
and the first lady and hidden in straw. A few were 
signed by the first family’s cat. Socks. 

Preparations for the event began well before Mr. 
Clinton blew the whistle to start the Easter egg roll. 

“I woke up before dawn this morning,'’ he told 
the frowd. **And when I got up just at dawn, I 
already saw the Easter bunnies out here w aiving 
around, plotting their strategies for the day and 
getting ready.” 

The Clintons were carrying on a tradition begun 
more than 1 80 years ago by President James Madi- 


PIUTE 


son and his wife, Douey. The egg roll was held at 
the Capitol in those days. President Rutherford B. 
Hayes and his wife, Lucy, moved it to the White 
House in 1878 and it has been held there ever since, 


Away From Politics 

• A convict who Tohmteered to be executed was put 
to death by lethal injection in Texas. Richard Lee 
Beavers, 38, who was convicted of kidnapping and 
murdering a Houston restaurant manager and rap- 
ing the manager's wife in 1986, was pronounced 
dead about eight minutes after state officials b$gan 
the flow of lethal drugs into tubes attached to his 
arms. He was put to death at the state prison at 
Huntsville, north of Houston, state officials said. 
He became the third ™an executed in Texas this 
year. 

• Fire pitted an amusement part ride in El Paso, 

Texas, seriously bunting four passengers, three of 
them children. Nine persons, including a fire fight- 
er, were injured is & blaze at Weston Playland. 
No buildings were other than the Gold 

Nugget, a tKrifl ride through what is designed to 
lookiike an abandoned gold mine. 

• Tbe-Menandez estate has dwindfed to a little 
more than 52 million and owes more than its 


except during the two world wars. The White 
House said about 42.000 children participated last 
year and more were expected this year. (Reuters) 

Can Ex-Senator Jump Cine? 

ROCKVILLE, Maryland — After three 
in public life, WDHam E. Brock 3d is regarded as one 
of the most skilled politicians in the Republican 
Pany. But his decision to run to the Senate from ; 
Maryland 17 years after serving as a senator from 
Tennessee has puzzled even his biggest admirers. 

Of the many reasons put forth bv his friends as 
to why Mr. Brock should not return to the fray of 
elective politics, this is the most persuasive: He 
would probably lose. Though he could make histo- 
ry as the first senator elected by popular vote from 
two different states, Democrats are already attack- 
ing him as a carp eib agger. 

If he survives a handful of opponents in the 
September primary, Mr. Brock would face Senator 
Paul S. Sarbanes, a three-terra Democratic incum- 
bent who is considered by the national Republican 
Party to have a relatively secure seat. 

Mr. Brock, who served from 1971 to 1977, ac- 
knowledges that he has few fond memories of the 
“poisonous atmosphere" that surrounded the Wa- 
tergate scandal. “1 think it’s worse now than it 
was,” he said. So why doesn't be go back and tend 
to his consulting firm, enjoy the millions he inher- 
ited from his family's candy fortune and spend 
lime with his grandchildren at his waterside estate 
near Annapolis, Maryland? 

Mr. Brock said he was running because he knew 
the issues and could have more influence than he 
did now as a member of several volunteer organi- 
zations. "I just decided that I could make a differ- 
ence. that f am truly, deeply worried about the 
direction of this country,” he said. (NYT) 

Quote /Unquote 

Gary Suo, a high school teacher in Wisconsin, 
on the Whitewater issue: “I think Bill Clinton is 
doing one helluva job and he deserves our support. 
He's taking on the tough issues and I definitely 
think he's getting a bum rap. 1 think the press Is 
doing a terrible job of covering it” (W?) 


assets, according to court records. Jose and Kitty 
Mcnendez were estimated to have been worth 
S14.S milli on when they were killed in their Beverly 
Hilk, California, home by their sons, Erik and 
Lyle, in 1989. Records show that after the slayings 
the estate took several huge losses, including 51.8 
mSlion from selling furniture and bonds, $1-2 
million in the sale of the home, and 5531,000 is a 
stock sale 

• The countdown has begun for the launching of the 
shuttle Endeavour. The nine-day flight, beginning 
Thursday, is part of NASA’s Mission to Planet 
Earth, an ongoing program to study the planet 
from space. The crew will takes pictures from 
above the Amazon River, the Andes, the Alps, 
Patagonia, the Galapagos Islands, the Sahara, 
Death Valley and otter sites. Meanwhile. Earth 
wiU be scanned by what NASA says is the most 
sophisticated radar ever sent into space for envi- 
ronmental purposes. Reusers. AP 




i r 

l2as s«a 






In New Texas, Computers Fuel the Rebound 


By Sue Anne Pressley 

Washington PoU Service 

SUGAR LAND, Tern — After 
15 years' of booms and busts and 
painful’ recovery, a new Texas is 
taking shape in the former cotton 
fields of Fori Bend County. This 
time, the emphasis is suits instead 
of boots. 

Texans here live in big brick 
houses, surrounded by artificial 
lakes and pampered pansy beds 
and mechanical graders working 
daily to convert still more fields to 
tidy residential parcels. They have 
high-paying jobs, lots of children 
and 14 golf courses. Many of these 
Texans used to be Californians. 

If the fortunes of Texas in the 
1970s and '80s were chronicled 
through the ups and downs of 


Houston, the Texas of the '90s is 
perhaps best explained through the 
explosive growth and emerging 
character of Fort Bend County. 

Population surveys place this 
county of nearly 250,000 people 
third among the nation's fastest' 
growing white-collar addresses, 
and its rapid development reflects a 
trend that is likely to make Texas 
stronger, if more" predictable, in 
years to come. 

Some things will never be the 
same in this big, bluff state. There 
were the glory years, when oQ 
reigned, men with calluses on their 
palms and working-class origins 
commanded fat paychecks, and the 
future or a shrewd Texan seemed 
limitless. 

Then came the lean vears of the 


'80s. when the freakish combina- 
tion of an oil bust, a real estate 
crash and a second oil bust devas- 
tated many a spirit and bank ac- 
count in just five years. 

In what some might view as typi- 
cal Texas fashion, however, the 
state economy has made a smart 
rebound, shifting from oil, natural 
gas. cotton and cattle to the more 
sober and perhaps more stable en- 
deavors of the future, the computer 
and sendee industries. 

And. in a fortuitous twist, the 
state's highly publicized fall con- 
tributed nicely to its resurgence. 
Because of its earlier troubles, the 
cost of doing business in Texas has 
been considerably lower than the 
national average, a fact employed 
successfully by staie and load offi- 



RmcubVTbc Aaocatcd 

Bifly Hendon, one the three American fact-finders being expelled by Vietnam, at his Hanoi hoteL 

Hanoi to Expel 3 MIA Fact-Finders 


77if Associated Press 

HANOI — Three Americans 
seeking evidence of their country- 
men held prisoner after the Viet- 
nam War nave been denied access 
to an alleged underground prison 
and musHeave the country, Viet- 
namese officials said Monday. 

The officials said the three insist- 
ed on visiting a sensitive military 
installation in Vinh Phu Province, 
60 miles (100 kilometers) northwest 
of Hanoi, that is off-limits to for- 
eigners The officials said the three 
must leave because their visas were 
expiring. 

The Americans are Billy Hen- 
don, a former US. congressman 
from North Carolina; Beth Stew- 
art, a Washington attorney and 


daughter of an American pilot shot 
down during the war; ana Lament 
Gaston, bead of a veterans organi- 
zation. They had asked u> enter the 
site during a fact-finding trip that 
began March 20. 

Miss Stewart is chairwoman of 
the POW Publicity Fund of Wash- 
ington, and Mr. Hendon is a con- 
sultant for the organization. Mr. 
Gaston is national president of 
VietNow, a group based in Rock- 
ford, Illinois. 

Mr. Hendon said U.S. officials 
responsible for investigating cases 
of tni-«mg American servicemen 
were overlooking Vietnamese pris- 
ons as a potential source of clues. 

“They .go. and^dig around jjie 


dais working overtime io sell the 
stale's outsized virtues. 

The results have been convinc- 
ing. Much of the rest of the nation 
is still recovering from the 1990-91 
recession that Texas never experi- 
enced. Each year since 1990, Texas 
has been the fastest growing of the 
10 most populous states, both in 
people and jobs. In a recent 12- 
month period it gained 180,000 
jobs, as many as California lost 

Last week, demographers with 
the LIS. Census Bureau predicted 
that sometime this year. Texas 
(pop. 18,031.484) will outstrip New 
York (pop. 18,197,154) io become 
the nation's second most populous 
state behind California. 

But every gain has its price: As 
Texas shifts from its long depen- 
dence on natural resources to a new 

focus on human resources — and 
the business, health and recreation 
services they can provide — the 
state that has always prided itself 
an its uniqueness is not so different 
anymore. 

"Texas now looks like the rest of 
the country so much more titan we 
ever did before,” said Jared Hazle- 
ton, director of the Center for Busi- 
ness and Economic Analysis at 
Texas A&M University and author 
of a monthly newsletter on the state 
economy. 

“We’re unique, maybe, because 
we’re a younger and growing popu- 
lation, more ethnierhe said, “kit 
if you look at our economy, can you 


really lefl when you leave Dallas 
and go to Los Angeles? We like to 
think of ourselves as different. We 
ding to those myths. Bui I think, by 
and large, they are gone." 

Of course, any attempt to define, 
or redefine, the Texas economy col- 
lides with the fact that Texas is 
really not one state but five or six. 

For evenr Austin, now ranked 
second behind California's Silicon 
Valley in the number of computer- 
related jobs, there is a Midland. In 
that West Texas city, (he quin les- 
sen rial oil town with its Petroleum 
Museum and the place where a 
young George Bosh got his start as 
a wildcatter four decades ago, the 
job-growth rate last year was a 
scant three-tenths of 1 percent. At 
the same time, Austin registered a 
growth rate of 6J percent, well 
above the national average of li. 

The rise of Fort Bend County 
does not necessarily portend the 
decline of Houston, the nation's 
fourth largest city with 1.6 million 
people. But after the pounding of 
the ’80s, Houston has had a lone 
road to travel. Job growth lagged 
slightly behind the national rate 
last year, and a medical center — 
not the petroleum industry — is 1 
now Houston’s largest employer. 

But as the promotional' Greater 
Houston Partnership is quick to 
point out, the city still reigns as the 
energy capital of the United States, 
hone to more than 5,000 energy- 
related companies. 


airplane wrecks,” Mr. Hendon 
said. “Why don't they go” around 
the prisms and “interview (he wit- 
nesses?” 

The commander of the U.S. MIA 
office in Vietnam, Li e u tenant Col- 
onel John Cray, said Mr. Hendon 
had not him during his 

visit But Colonel Cray said his task 
force had investigated a number of 
Vietnamese prisons; one as recently 
as last month, for signs of missing 
Americans. 

“The U.S. government looks at 
every piece of evidence that comes 


“The U.S. government looks at 
every piece of evidence that comes 
in, regardless of the source,” Colo- 
nel Cray said. So far. he said, his 
unit has found no proof that Amer- 
icans, were imprisoned in Vietnam 
.after the war. • .. _ .. , ■ 


T 


ECHNIC A 

WRITING 


L 


The Smart Career Move of 

Now in its fourth year, the Technical Writi 
The American University of Paris has 
prepared documentation specialists for rew 
in software and telecommunications world 
Call to reserve a place at a free informal 
Teh (1) 47 20 44 99 

The Program: 

the 90’s 
ng Program of 
successfully 
raiding careers 
wide. 

ion session: 

• B months 

• part-time evening dosses 

• taught in English 

• job placement assistance 

ESSIONS: 

at 1 0:00 

or 23 


A Mi; RK a N IN! Y KRSn y 
or PARIS 

i irhitifiu i!i‘ Ittnittit it'll ;< rrm n u < "U 


\ ✓ r-i 


a- Cj**'*'. CrP v 

?&*** cWm 

mm****** 


r.y " P|P 

C*-k V •••?•' : ' v jjSL . 





■m;'. ■ A, 

. "*• 

. r /- : -’V 


m ■■ 'CEN4 : 


v" .. 


'.Ail 














r? i | 

* * * I 

iV m 

|... .,1: 

I""" ' 5f 

-- .... I |fi| 

m 



... « • • • * * 


tW&Fi - 

■ ..A ’ t. £ - 


. - 

'•f.7 “-v 



NOW YOU CAN TURN ANY PHONE IN THE WORLD INTO A WORLDPHONE” 

Be it in a bazaar in Egypt., a hotel room in Buenos Aires... on a street comer in Call from country to country, or back to the U.S., without intimidation or 

Hona Kong... or even in a friend's home in Greece, you can turn virtually any phone complications. No language barriers. No currency problems. No outrageous 
lA/nrirl intn a WnrlHPhnnfi* hotel surcharges. 


Be it in a bazaar in Egypt., a hotel room in Buenos Aires... on a street comer in 
Hong Kong... or even in a friend's home in Greece, you can turn virtually any phone 
in the world into a WorldPhone* 

All you need to know is the WorldPhone access number for the country you re 
in. Dial this access number, and you will get an operator who speaks your 
language, and economical rates from overseas. And if you're a. member of 
MCI Friends & Family,® you can save an additional 20% off on each call you make 
to your Calling Circle® when you use your MCI Card.® 


To receive a WorldPhone calling guide call 1-800-996-7535. 


ME 


, JB* 




WosfA 


From MCI 


Let It Take \bu Around The World. 




fei.3 








p 

I 


ci. 


Gfl 

F 


AA 
B 
C 
h 
St 
AA 
B 
C 
G 
G 
H 
T 
AB 
E 
F 
F 
G 
U 
AF 
AH 
B 
F 
L 
Alt 
A 
A 
B 
C 
C 
G 
G 
G 
H 
H 
I r 
Ir 
L 

N 

Si 

T 

T 

U 

u 

V 

V 
M 

AW 

A 

lr 

In 

V 
AP 

C- 

G 

Ir 

AS) 

Aa 

Ir. 

A 

9 

Aa 

Aa 

Ad- 

Ad* 

Ad- 

Ad* 

G 

G 

H 

m 

<v 

Si 

Art 

A 

B- 

G 

In 

Ah 

G 

lr 

N 

Si 

AK 

A 

B> 

B 

B 

G 

C 

C 

C 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

lr 

ir 

Ir 

lr 

N 

N 

W 

V 

u 

u 

V 

V 
IV 
N 
N 
U 
W 
u 
1C 
AC 
IV 

u 

w 

AC 

M 

IV 

AC 

N 

N 

N 

N 

N 

N 

P 

P 

a 

S' 

S’ 

T 

w 

Air 

B 

B 

E 

G 

L 

R 

Ait 

Ait 

B 

B 

C 

G 

Ic 

lr 

lr 

9 

Air 

B 

C 

G 

lr 

lr 

9 

T 

Ait 

B 

C 

G 

Ir 

lr 

9 

T 

Air 

E 

F 

lr 

Air 

B 

E 

lr 

L 

Air 

C 

C 

c 

c 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

e 

E 

E 

F 

F 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

H 

H 


GUI 

U 


u 


1C 


“B 

Mi 

Cn 


r* 

Afc 


Page 4 


** 



China’s No. 1 Rebel vanishes 

Beijing Won’t Tell Diplomats Where He Is 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

Ww York Tuna Service 

BEIJING — Wei Jingsheng has 
disappeared. 

China’s best-known dissident 
has not been seen by his family, his 
secretary or his associates in Beij- 
ing’s democracy underground since 
Friday, when seven carloads of se- 
curity agents arrested him. 

A cryptic government statement 
on Saturday said Mr. Wei left a 
Public Security Bureau station “im- 
mediately" after an interrogation. 

But the statement did not say 
whether he was in the custody of 
the police or whether he was taken 
to another place of detention, as his 
family and Western governments 
now suspect 

The U.S. Embassy tried three 
times Monday, through diplomatic 
channels, to clarify Mr. Wei's sta- 
tus, but received no reply, a diplo- 
mat said. 

“We axe assuming that he is still 
bang detained," the diplomat said, 
^j usi because we have not been able 
to confirm that he has been re- 
leased." 

If be is still in detention, the 
Saturday statement implying that 
Mr. Wei had been freed may have 
been a deliberate deception. West- 
ern diplomats said. 

Though Mr. Wei's fate is not 
directly tied to President B01 Clin- 
ton’s decision linking China’s fu- 
ture status as an American trading 
partner with its human rights re- 
cord, the 43-year-dd dissident is 
the most powerful symbol of the 
h uman rights campaign inside the 
country. 

His continued detention, after 
14 Vi years imprisonment, can only 
inflame the atmosphere surround- 
ing China' s bid to uncouple its 
true relations from international 
concern over human rights abuses. 

In a separate development Mon- 
day, Beijing court authorities con- 
firmed that a reporter for the Hong 


Kong newspaper Ming Pao bad 
been secretly tried, convicted and 
sentenced to 12 years in prison for 
his news-gathering activities. 

The reporter, XI Yang, was ar- 
rested last September and held in - 
comm uni cado. 

The court said Mr. Xfs news- 
gathering amounted to “stealing 
and spying on state secrets." Fam- 
ily members said they would peti- 
tion the court to review the sen- 
tence. 

A clerk at the People’s Bank of 
Chma, who was said to have pro- 
vided Mr. Xi with information on 
interest rates and government gold 
purchases, was sentenced to 15 
years. 

The stiff sentences stunned Mr. 
Xi’s colleagues, many of whom 
gather news cm the mainland every 
day and live under the threat of 
similar action when they penetrate 
deeper than government propagan- 
da statements. 

The fate of a second reporter, 
Gao Yu, arrested in Beijing at the 
same time on unspecified charges, 
is stin unknown. She was seized as 
she prepared to leave for an aca- 
demic year at Columbia Universi- 
ty. 

In this season of focus on Chi- 
na's rights record, the sentencing of 
Mr. Xi and his banking source to 
long terms is likely to further in- 
flame sentiments against the Com- 
munist Party leadership, as will the 
disappearance of Mr. wei, who had 
a strong following in Hong Kong. 

Chinese police and Foreign Min- 
istry officials claimed to nave no 
knowledge of Mr. Wefs where- 
abouts. or refused to take questions 
on the matter. 

A Foreign Ministry spokeswom- 
an asserted that the reason for Mr. 
Wei's interrogation was his viola- 
tion of the conditions of his parole. 

“According to the information 
from the competent departments, 
Wd Jingsheng violated relevant 
regulations when he was on parole 


and when he was being deprived of 
political rights,” the ministry offi- 
cial said. 

“The Public Security Bureau has 
the right to interrogate him accord- 
ing to the law,” the official added. 

One of Mr. Wei’s associates said 
it seemed posable that Communist 
Party leaders, wbo have taken a 
direct interest in Mr. Wei's case, 
may want to keep him silent and 
away from Beijing until after the 
the fifth anniversary of the military 
crackdown at Tiananmen Square 
in June 1989. 


By picking up Mr. Wd on Easter 
weekend, the authoritic 


authorities have 
avoided the international criticism 
that surrounded the March 4 de- 
tention of Mr. WeL 
At that time, President Bill Clin- 
ton and Secretary of State Warren 
M. Christopher both made public 
statements calling for Mr. Wefs 
rdease. 

Chinese officials said the first 
arrest was related to Mr. Wei's 
meeting on Feb. 27 with the State 
Department's senior human rights 
official. John Shattuck. 


As Sicily Tunis Right, Anti- Mafia Crusade Fizzles 


By Alan Cowell 

JVrw York Tima Service 

PALERMO. Sicily — Two years after 
thedr protests ignited Sicily and galvanized 
the authorities into fighting the mob. Sici- 
ly’s anti-Mafia campaigners suffered a 
startling defeat in ejections a week ago. 

They became victims of the region's 
economic misery, a desire for change, and. 
paradoxically, the very zeal they brought 
to combating organized crime, losing the 
March 27-28 elections to the rightist alli- 
ance led by tbe mafia magnate Silvio Ber- 
lusconi It was the same coalition they 
accused of being tbe mob's choice 

In November, Leoluca Orlando of the 
anti-Mafia La Rete party stormed to vic- 
tory in the mayoral election here with a 
record 75 percent of tbe vote. But such has 
been the disenchantment with him since 
then that his party’s representation in Par- 
liament crumbled from 15 seats to 1. 

Several anti- Mafia campaigners attrib- 
uted the turnaround to complex shifts in a 
conservative Sicilian society inspired by 
economic disappointment, the quest for a 
new political home after the collapse of the 
long-governing Christian Democrats and 
a sense among some Sicilians that the anti- 
Mafia campaign was running out of steam. 

In interviews with Sicilian intellectuals. 


journalists, politicians, and anti-Mafia 
campaigners, many spoke out against 
what they viewed as the inquisitorial na- 
ture of Mr. Orlando's administration. And 
some said the anti-Mafia campaign's close 
ties to the former Communists, who lost 
tbe ejection, undercut its support at a time 
when Sicily, like the rest of Italy, was 
swinging to the right. 

“Inis is a return to normal,” said Guido 
Lo Porto, a member of tbe neofascist Na- 
tional Alliance, which campaigned across 
Italy with Mr. Berlusconi's Forza Italia 
party and the separatist Northern League 
of Umberto Bossi. 

“Now we can live without the air of 
suspicion sown by Orlando." Mr. Lo Porto 
said, referring to his victor , 1 in a central 
Palermo district over Antonio Caponeno, 
a respected former judge who was a linch- 
pin of the anti-Mafia campaig n and who 
helped send hundreds of mafiosi to jail in 
the much-publicized trials of the mid- 
1980s. 

Like Mr. Lo Porto, other rightist Sicil- 
ians maintain Tha t the anti- Mafia cam- 
paign had become a witch hunt, stifling 
economic activity and hurting ordinary 
people. Even before the early elections, 
Mr. Lo Porto declared that “Sicilians do 
not want a government of judges." 


But to Marta Gmino, who helped in- 
spire Sicilians to protest against the mob 
by han ging bed sheets emblazoned with 
anti-Mafia slogans from their balconies, 
the electoral outcome “is very, very worry- 
ing." 

“Our work will become much more dil- 
ficult and so will Orlando’s," she said. 

Since the killing of two anti-Mafia 
judges here two years ago, Palermo and 
other parts of Sicily have been seized with 
an anti-Mafia fervor that galvanized the 
authorities into enacting tougher legisla- 
tion. thus providing assurance to investi- 
gators that their inquiries into organized 
crime would dot be hindered by politi- 
cians. 

The results have been evident. Hun- 
dreds of millions of dollars of Mafia assets 
have been seized and some of the seaior 
basses jailed, including Salvatore (To to) 
Riina, the reputed boss of all bosses. 

The victories were all the more striking 
after the long years of Christian Demo- 
cratic dominance, in Sicily and elsewhere 
in Italy, which, Mafia informants have 
asserted, protected organized-crime 
groups from investigation and prosecution 
at the highest leveL 

With Italy's huge corruption scandal 


though, the Christian Democrats’ power 
crumbled, leaving a void here and else- 
where in Italy that has evidently been 
filled by Mr. Berlusconi's rightist alliance, 
which took 43 of the 55 seats allotted to 
Sicily’s 4 million voters. 


While opponents of Mr. Berlusconi as- 
cribe his amorce's success in pan to sup- 
port from the island’s 150 Mafia families, 
hn accusation that he rejects, many Sicil- 
ians argue that Mr. Orlando, who declined 
to be interviewed, raised expectations that 

he could not meet when be was elected 
mayor last year. 


“People thought it was a magic mo- 
ment," Ms. Cunmo, the anti-Mafia cam- 
paigner, said. "They thought the Mafia 
would be defeated and everything would 
be better overnight. And when nothing 
happened, it was a betrayal” 


“The struggle against the Mafia does 
not create jobs or fin stomachs," said 
Mario Cenlorrino, a Palermo journalist. 
“After the excitement of the parades and 
the demonstrations in the piazza, there is 
still the pot to be filled ana placed on tbe 
stove. And so there is a temptation to 
follow whoever promises to fill the pot and 
keep it filled." 



12 

j\Veh‘ 


Agostinho da Silva Dies, 
Portuguese Philosopher 



Berlusconi and Ally 
At Impasse on Cabinet 


The Associated Press 

LISBON — Agostinho da Silva, 
88 . a nonconformist philosopher 
and a leading government critic 
during Portugal's half-century erf 
dictatorship, died Sunday in a Lis- 
bon hospital. 

He had suffered a stroke six 
months ago. 

Mr. da Silva left Portugal during 
the rightist dictatorship of Antonio 
Salazar, saying that bis “bachelor's 
degree in liberty and doctorate in 
anger” made him an ideal candi- 
date for exile. 

He roamed from Lisbon through 
Madrid and Paris to Africa, Asia, 
tbe United States and BraziL He 
was master of 15 languages, and 
Portuguese students were inspired 
by his extensive experiences. 

Mr. da Silva stayed in Brazil for 
25 years, became a citizen and 
helped to found five universities. 
He returned to Portugal in the late 
1960s, but did not regain his citi- 
zenship until 1991 

The white-haired, bearded phi- 
losopher also was an accomplished 
poet, novelist and critic of the arts, 
sciences, society and politics. As an 
aging professor, he spoke out for 
students’ rights ana frequently 
used the motto: “Man was bom to 
create, not to work." 


British codenamed “window" and 
the Americans “chaff" to counter 
German radar detection of allied 
bombers. Thin metallic foil strips 


Doitd BmAk/nc Auodalcd Pres* 


A father and daughter eariy Monday at a tent camp in Verahnn, South Africa. They are refugees from the recent violence in KwaZulu. 


Agattx France- Presse 

ARCORE, Italy — A dispute 
escalated Monday between Silvio 
Berlusconi whose' Forza Italia par- 
ty led Italy’s general election, and 
ms critical Northern League ally. 

malting the rhannes of fo rming a 

government together increasingly 
remote. 

Mr. Berlusconi the media mag- 
nate who launched Forza Italia 
only a few mo nths before last 
week’s election, on Monday at- 
tacked the Northern League leader, 
Umberto Bossi, after failing to 
make headway on a new cabinet. 

Mr. Bossi has rejected Mr. Ber- 
lusconi as a candidate lor the post 
of prime minister, demanded great- 
er local autonomy as a condition 
for joining the government and de- 
clined a further meeting with him. 

“Umberto Bossi seems to want 
to give way to the temptation of 
faffing into the old rut" by includ- 


rdeased into the air created a radar ZULUS: Dangers for South Africa in Underestimating Tribe’s Strength ALGERIA: Closer to Civil War 


enemy radar crews about the loca- Continued from Page 1 
lion oftheir real target. The tech- fringe benefits for him, better than 
mque. first used dunng a raid on what hc ^ £a t in E now. It will be 


Hamburg in July 1943, resulted in a 
sharp decline in bomba losses. 

As tiie allies’ 1944 D-Day inva- 
approached, Mr. Gooebmn 


sion 


and otoeis developed a system to 
broadcast fake electronic signals to 
deceive the Germans about the lo- 
cation of the allied landings in Nor- 
mandy. 


Sir Robert Cockburn, 85, 
Electronic Warfare Pioneer 

LONDON (AP) — Sir Robert 
Cockburn, 85. the leader of an elec- 
tronic warfare team in World War 
n whose work is credited with sav- 
ing thousands of allied lives, died 
March 21 at Aldershot, a military 
garrison town southwest of Lon- 
don. 

Mr. Cockburn and his team of 
scientists and engineers devised 
measures to jam navigational radio 
beams that the Germans had devel- 
oped to guide their bombers to 
British cities. The successful opera- 
tion resulted in many enemy bomb- 
ers missing their targets, although 
the Germans went on to produce 
new, more sophisticated beam sys- 
tems. 

Lata in the war, Mr. Cockburn 
and his team developed what the 


Betty Furness, 78, Actress, 
And Consumer Advocate 

NEW YORK (AP) —Betty Fur- 
ness, 78, who went from starring in 
B movies and TV ads for refrigera- 
tors to working as a consumer ad- 
vocate and reporter, died Saturday 
in New York of stomach canca. 

Miss Furness was a Hollywood 
actress in the 1930s, and in the 
1950s riie became the well-known 
spokeswoman for Westinghouse 
appliances, telling millions of tele- 
vision viewers “Yon can be sure if 
it’s Westinghouse." In the late 
1960s and eariy 70s she worked as 
a consumer advocate, and in 1976 
began a 16-year career as a con- 
sumer affairs reporter for the “To- 
day" show on NBC television. 

Raymond Geiger, 83, the editor 
of the Faunas’ Almanac who 
brought weather forecasts, garden- 
ing tips and quips to readers for six 
decades, died Friday in Lewiston, 
Maine, of Parkinson’s disease. 


enough.' 

No tribe in southern Africa 
arouses the mixture of fear and 
romance inspired by tbe Zulus, the 
largest ethnic group, with about 7 
million of 40 million South Afri- 
cans, and tbe most nationalistic. 

Many Zulus are educated and 
urbanized, and many — most polls 
say a majority — prefer the ANC to 
Chief Buthdezi’s Inkatha. 

But even Zulus wbo despise 
Chief Buthdezi usually acknowl- 
edge some loyalty to tbe king, and a 
strong sense of being Zulu. 

It is the only remaining monar- 
chy among tbe dozen or so tribes of 
Scmth Africa, and the only tribe 
with such an imperial history. King 
Shaka, the brutal militarist of the 
early 19th century, built the Zulus 
by forcible amalgamation of many 
powerless dans and tribes into a 
war machine that gave nightmares 
lo both the British and the Boers. 

“The history of battle is what 
unites the Zulus and encourages 
them," Chef Mlaba said. “No one 
dse conquered tbe British Army. 
Although they were beaten later, 
they stffi believe they can maintain 
that sense of beating (he oncoming 
government. That’s their weakness. 
They forget that all that was in 
olden days." 

Impetuous pride, Chief Mlaba 


said, is a national trait of his peo- 
ple. 

“They don’t take things easy.” he 
said. “They jump before looking 
into things seriously. It takes time 
to realize their mistake.” 

Mrs. Mzcri, whose husband is 
Zulu and whojoined Intatha when 
it was still a Zulu cultural move- 
ment, agreed: “They can tolerate to 
some extent but when they are 
angry nothing can stop them. Now 
it has reached a stage where no one 
can stop them." 

The other tiring history has be- 
stowed upon most Zulus, she add- 
ed, is an attachment to the land. 

“In their communities there was 
never any need to vote," Mis. Mziri 
said. 

To the traditional Zulus, she 
said, the most burning issue is not 
political freedom or the right to 
vote, nor promises of modern 
houses and clinics. 

The issue is territory, which is 
held by the tribe and allocated by 
the drier. 

“They believe they are the only 
nation that fought the British and 
the Boers, and so most erf the things 
in South Africa belong to them,” 
she said. 

When architects of apartheid de- 
vised 10 black homelands, the one 
they created for the Zulus was a 
withered version of King Shaka’s 
domain. 

On the map, KwaZulu 


is a 


splotchy rash across the former 
British colony called Natal the 
choicest parts of which whites kept 
for themselves. 

On the ground, the boundaries 
are unmarked but unmistakable: 
wherever the undulating pasture 
heaves upward into eroded red hEQ- 
szdes, wherever the paved road 
turns to gravel wherever the colo- 
nial-style plantations give way to 
huts and tin-roofed shanties, that is 
probably KwaZulu. 

The area north of the Tugela 
River, which crosses central Natal 
is mostly rural and overwhelming- 
ly Inkatha. It is the stronghold of 
Zulu tradition. 

Tbe Zulus could have bad their 
independence in the 1970s, when 
the South African government 
tried to spin off the fledgling home- 
lands. 

To Pretoria’s fray. Chief Buthe- 
leri, the homeland leader, refused. 

The chief, a cousin of the king, 
was happy to use the levers of tribal 
power, but he aspired to be more 
than an ethnic politician. He want- 
ed to be a pan-African liberation 
leader, and Iris Inkatha movement 
to be a match for the ANC. 

In tbe 1980s the ANC through a 
surrogate called the United Demo- 
cratic Front, moved strongly into 
Natal targeting inkatha The con- 
gress and its allies made many con- 
verts in tiie cities and urban town- 
ships, among the yonng and 


educated, but did not penetrate 
into the more remote rural areas. 

The rivalry was often violent, 
and it shattered what remained of 
Znlu unity. 

Although the young operatives 
of the ANC had little taste for what 
they called "the demon of tribal- 
ism,” they won over a number of 
Zulu chiefs, men who had fallen 
out with the royal family or who 
presided in areas near the rides and 
saw the inexorable encroachment 
of modem times. 

Inkatha, in turn, extended its 
reach to the Zulu migrant workers 
in the cities and townships around 
Johannesburg. 

Often, Zulus add that despite its 
staunch nonrarial policies the 
ANC furthers the ambitions of the 
Xhosa tribe, including Mr. Man- 
dela. 

Xhosas, like the Zulus an off- 
shoot of the Nguni peoples who 
descended into Natal in the 16th 
century, predominate along the 
coast in the eastern Cape region. 
Because they were the first to en- 
counter European missionary edu- 
cation, they have been dispropor- 
tionately represented among 
liberation leaders. 

“Why do you never write about 
the ‘Xhosa-based ANCT ” Chief 
Buthdezi snapped during an inter- 
view last week, complaining that 
Inkatha is so often identified as a 
Zulu interest group. 


Continued from Page 1 
French — are moving out, tourists 
are staying away, and France is 
worried about a tide of refugees. 

Those who have left point to the 
dramatic deterioration in law and 
order throughout the nation, re-' 
fleeted in a near paralysis of public 
and government services and a no- 
table increase in armed attacks and 
counterattacks by fundamentalist 
and secularist vigilante groups 
sponsored by various clans. 

The two-year spate of bloodshed 
began when a fundamentalist par- 
ty, the Islamic Salvation Front, 
won tbe ruling majority in the first 
round of free parliamentary elec- 
tions in 1991. 

The military government can- 
ed ed the next round of elections 
and outlawed the party, which is 
known by its French acronym, FIS. 

pie Islamic Salvation Front re- 
taliated with a campaign of vio- 
lence that has continued since die 
party went underground. 

But while much of the killing in 
the last 24 months has been carried 
out by fundamentalists and aimed 
at intellectuals and officials, there 
is little doubt that pro-government 
forces have indulged in subterfuge 
and killing as weD. 

Those who speak out in favor of 
negotiating an end to the killing 
often put their own lives at risk. 

A senior Islamic leader who em- 


SETTLERS: Some Settlers in the Gaza Strip Start Leaving After Finding the Price of Their Dream *Too High ’ 


To subscribe in Cwuiony 


just call, loll Free, 

013084 8585 


Contirmed from Page 1 
by the citrus groves and Arab vine- 
yards. The shot ricocheted loudly 
inside this hamlet of mobile homes 
near the Green Line, (he pre-1967 
border of Israel on tbe northern 
end of the strap. The settlers had 
been unhappy for a long time with 
what they said was a lack of protec- 
tion by the army. 

So, on Sunday night, most of the 
16 families took tents and sleeping 
bags and moved to the campsite 
across the bonder and appealed to 
the Israeli government for help. 


Ironically, the Dugit f amities 
walked oat about four hours after 
tbe main settlers’ movement issued 
a news release announcing that Du- 
git was one of the small Jewish 
settlements in the Gaza Strip that 
“will remain in place." 

“I came to build another life, a 
safer life, out of the city," said 
Boda Salmon, a 26-year-old Israeli 
policeman, who tome his wife and 
three children out of Dugit and 
brought than to tbe tent camp. 
“Now, we are afraid." 

Mr. Salmon and the other set- 


tlers came in 1990 to build a fishing 
village that they hoped would be- 
come a tourist attraction. The 
name, Dugit, means “a small fish- 
ing boat" in Hebrew. The dream 
was that they wonld sail during the 
day while others would operate a 
restaurant. Although they woe in 
Gaza, it was so close lo the borda 
that they figured, wrongly, that 
someday they would be annexed by 
Israel. 

Their hopes are reflected in an 
orange sign for tourists that Israel 
erected along the road, pointing to 


a “Fisherman’s Village." But de- 
spite years of effort by the settlers, 
the project never got off the 
ground. 


The settlement was a source of 
friction in 1989 when the Israeli 
cabinet approved it just before a 
visit by ihen-Prime Minister Yitz- 
hak Shamir lo Washington. Forma 
President George 'hush, who 

thought he bad WOfl a c ommitmen t 
from Mr. Shamir to curb settle- 
ment activity, became angry when 
he beard about the decision on Du- 


git just before Mr. S hamir ’s arrival 
ax the White House. 

The Dugit families were never 
happy with tbe location that Israeli 
military officials forced them to ac- 
cept, dose to the Arab village of 
Belt Lahxya. The settlers wanted to 
be closer to the beach, but were 
told the army could not protect 
them there. So they moved into tbe 
squat mobile homes they were pro- 
vided and decorated the pathways 
with bright orange fishing rope. 

"I just came here for dreams," 
said Miri Shavit, a mother of two 


children who arrived four years 
ago. “My husband loves to fish ” 

But now, she said, the dreams 
have faded. “We are realists,” she 
said. 

“Wl : ;e what’s going on. Wejust 
want to live a normal life. Now, I 
don't leave my children alone. We 
are afraid, realty afraid. No one 
was wounded on Friday, but we 
don’t want to wait until someone is 
hurt.” 

She added: “We just want to 
take the caravans and go inside 
Israel We fear the blood.” 


braced pacifism. Sheikh Moham- 
med Bouslemanl was killed be- 
cause he supported negotiations. 

President Mohammed Boudiaf. 
who was assassinated in 1992 by 
one of his bodyguards, is believed 
to have been killed on orders of 
some of the nuhtary clans in the 
army. Several pro-fundamentalist 
activists and senior officials who 
favored negotiations suffered simi- 
lar fates. 

The conflict has claimed the lives 
of more than 4,000 Algerians and 
34 foreigners in two years, and Mr. 
Saadi a ra^or Algerian opposition 
figure, warned there would be no 
winners in this war. 

Mr. Saadi's comments cany ad- 
ditional weight because his move- 
ment enjoys considerable support 
among the estimated 3 milli on eth- 
nic Berbers. 

Many of these Babers have ties 
to France and, while devout Mus- 
lims, they oppose tbe idea of a 
Muslim theocracy. 

An undetermined number 
among them have formed self-de- 
fense units, according to weD-in- 
fonned Algerians. 

The violence has gone beyond 
the assassination of intefiectnals 
and secularist enemies of funda- 
mentalists, which have now be- 
come routine, to include the burn- 
ing of dozens erf trains, buses, 
farms, schools and forests and the 
killing of women, some apparently 
because they’ were in public un- 
veiled. 

Such acts of violence are too dif- 
rtory in their aims 
leariy to one side 

or another. 

According to these offi cial* , at 
least two factions and perhaps as 
many as four have emerged within 
the military establishment, which 
has largely ruled the country since 
it became independent in 1962. 

The army’s chief of staff, Gener- 
al Mohammed Lamari, and the in- 
terior minister. General Selim Saa- 
di are presang Cor a fight to the 
end with tbe fundamentalists, tart- 
tressed by a call from the army 
reserves of 1 70,000 soldiers and of- 
ficers to cany it out. 


Suite up-grades 
for weekdays 
and even sweeter 
weekend packages. 


31 floors of value. 

THE LANDMARK 


OF BANGKOK 


a TfTTvivA'r -v' 13S Sukhumvit Rd, Bangkok, Thailand 
S UAVyV I T Fjx f662 , 253 .U*, Td 2540401 


iYn«4nfn«L niitm. 
kfA 


Airline Rcitarvjtkm Access OxJe - XL 


CLINTON: New Public Fear of Gridlock Amid the Whitewater Furor EXEATS: Goodies Hit Moscow 


Coutmued from Page 1 


hours Mr. Hinchey had to cut off the question- 
ing. Mr. Hindwy, an advocate of a single-payer 
system, like Canada has, found no consensus in 
the room. Many wbo spoke asked him to ex- 
plain bow tbe Clinton plan would affect them. 

At one pant he tried to describe tbe details 
of the administration proposal and when he 
got to the issue of health amances — the region- 
al cooperatives that would serve as insurance 
marketplaces for the public — eyes in tbe 
audience began to glaze over. 

Afterward, Jonathan Jacobson, a local law 
judge on the stale workers compensation board, 
said the evident confusion “snows how badly 
Clinton has done in presenting Ins plan and 
how easy it is to attack any number of points in 
a complicated plan. Even though everyone 
wants reform, right now it is on the defensive." 

Representative Eva Clayton, Democratic of 
North Carolina, heard the Ctintoo plan criti- 
cized as too complicated at a care forum in 
Fayetteville. 

“The simplest way is the best way," said 
Economy Smith Muhammad, who helps small 
businesses get established and grow. But Al 
Pierce, a Fayetteville businessman, said people 
were afraid of illness because of the cost of care. 


“If his plan is going to help tbe masses, I'm for 
It." he said, 

After hearing again from their constituents, 
the House members concluded (he burden rests 
on Congress to fashion a compromise from all 


Hinchey 

judged by whether we do the job or not” 

In a week in which Wall Street was rocked by a 
139-point drop in the Dow Jones industrial index 
while the government said tbe economy had 
produced 450,000 new jobs in February, the 
picture of the economic recovery was uneven. 

The Wisconsin district of Representative Per 
ter Barca, parts of winch were hard hit a few 
years ago, has begun to bounce bade after a 
deqp recession. But Mr. Hmchey said his up- 
state New York district had lost about 60,000 
jobs in the last three yean. 

Although the economy is not as powerful a 
political issue as it was two years ago, anger 
with Congress has not abated. “Sixty percent of 
than are crooks and they make it impossible lor 
the other 40 percent to get thrir jobs done,” said 
John Moal a state corrections department em- 
ployee from Yankee Lakes, New York. 

To counteract such impressions. Representa- 
tive Anthony C. Bexlenson, Democrat of Cali- 


fornia, tried to teD his constituents that tbe 
system is finally working. 

But many people fear that Whitewater clouds 
the agenda and they resent it. “I think they’ve 
blown tins out of proportion," said May Hol- 
land, a patient at a Fayetteville, North Caroli- 
na, dime, who nonetheless said she thinks Mr. 
Clinton may have done something wrong. 

A few believe Whitewater is a serious issue 
that deserves thorough investigation. Ron Dal- 
ton, a cm! engineer in Racine, said be thought 
Mr. Clinton was “skirting right on the line" 
legally and had committed ethical violations. 

Mr. Barca admitted that many of his col- 
leagues fear that Whitewater could restore grid- 
lock in Congress. During a visit to a high school 
government dass in Racine, he showed the un- 
ease many House Democrats fed about possible 
ootitica] impact of the issue when asked whether 
Mr. Clinton had done something wrong. 

“I don't know for sure, obviously.” be said. “I 
hope be didn't. J*m optimistic that be did not" 
Mr. Clinton remains a polarizing figure, but 
many people recognize that he is promoting an 
ambitious domestic agenda. 

“Clinton is a lot better than I thought," said 
John Rhoades of PUutekilL New York. “I 
didn’t think much of Mm when he was running, 
but he’s trying." 


Continued from Page 1 
isolated by a kind of “dollar apart- 
had," as foreign stores catered 
only to foreigners for Foreign cur- 
rency. 

But a new dass of rich Russians 
began demanding the same West- 
enwtyle amenities. The result has 
been a transformation in Moscow 
where virtually every central-city 
block has an array of imported 
goods, from furniture to food. To- 
day, dollar stores are no more and 
everything is on sale for rubles, 
although most Western goods re- 
main beyond the reach of average 
Russians. 

For Americans sick of watching 
tbe latest American movies badly 
dubbed into Russian, there is a 
sleek new movie theater that shows 
newly released U.S. films and even 
serves popcorn. Several radio sta- 
tions now broadcast in English 
with American-sryk disc jockeys. 
Two English-language newspapers 
are now published and are filled 
will advertisements by recently ar- 
rived Western firms looking to hire. 


Frustration with the woefully in- 
efficient Russian postal system has 
led to the creation erf two private 
rrnil services for expats. A branch 
of Zwemmers, an English book- 
store, carries the lafest novels. Of- 
fice equipment stores now cany 
every new make of computer, laser, 
printer and fax machine, and pro- 
vide spare parts as weQ. 


A Hong Kong tailor unmuo. 
made-to-order suits, shirts and 
jackets. French and German de- 
partment stores offer clothes and 
shoes that previously only found 
their way here stuffed into a return- 
ing foreigner’s suitcase. 

For some Moscow old-timers the 1 
j-hanges of the last few years have 
been almost too disorienting to' 

handle. A British woman, a teacher* 

vneJj 135 ^ ve< * here since the urid- 1 
I980s,_ recently recalled attending a! 
rewption several years ago at the- 
U.S. Embassy where a huge platter 
or caviar was served on a bed of 
lettece. It was the lettuce that ev- 
eryone attacked first. 


1 


ing in the process groups that were 
“rejected" by electors, Mr. Berlus- 
coni said in a statement from his 
home at Arcore, near Milan. 

Mr. Bossi reacted by calling a 
news conference at his home in 
nearby Ponte Di Legno. “A party 
that does not exist has won tbe 
elections thanks to manipulation of 
television, creating a Kafkaesqne 
situation," he said. “Citizens 
should understand that in such a 
situation, only the League can 
guarantee democracy.” 

Mr. Berlusconi had warned the 
League in his statement that its new 
deputies, elected thanks to the 
Fosza Italia campaign, should re- 
main “loyal to its electors and al- 
lies." 

“We will never forget that Forza 
Italia is the movement that gave 
voters the means to demolish" the 
discredited old political system, be 
said. 


-S: in, 
1 *■* 


, ici f., _ __ 


j ■, 







^ ; 


a.-. 


*. ^ - - 

... 




" — \ 


I 






F; 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 1994 


Page 5i 





INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION: SPECIAL DIRECTORY 




Colleges & Universities 


U.5JL 


' ft 




We help you put 
the pieces together. 


r--/ to. 


Y # 

lour career. Your c , 

UnvvmityW » O 
pers™ residency doctoral ™, . , _ 

program, all the pieces of * Walden offers access to 

life’s puzzle come together researcil univ “»fcy 

as one cohesive unit. With ^° Tary system, and direct 
our accredited program you } catss “ the world-wide 
can maintain your career, Inremec - 


Education, 

Health Services, 
Human 

| Services, and 
Administration/ 
Management. 

•Walden offers access to a 
major research university 


i u Aiiv 
1 ^Siiiriet 


your family commitments, A Master's degree required. 

and earn your PhD. at t- . , 

your own Dace bor "w™ tnfottnaaon, call 

residency require- 
men cs oy attending two 

weekend intensive sessions 01 1-813-261-7277 

per year at conference cen- (inte rn at i o na l? 

ters throughout the coun- 
try and a brief summer ses- 
sion. during the term of 
enrollment. 

• WaldenWtf-paced 155 Fifth Avenue South, 

individualized program Minneapolis, Minnesota 55401 

allows for accelerated . : . , . . . 

rnrnr i 1 „ . International (rum-Amenconj 

completion. itudeno must liniMMtfwif saris- 

• Work with nationally *&£&&**££% 

recognized faculty in English as a Foreign Language), 


155 Fifth Avenue South, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55401 

International. (non-American) 
students must demonstrate saris- 


THB NITmUUBI 


LE I 1 C 
„ EMERSON 



Eisop&wfairc^^ 


The European Institute for International Co mmunic ation 
(EIIC -Emerson) in Maastricht, the Netherlands, is the 
international branch of Emerson College in Boston, the only 
fully accredited university in the United States, since 1880 
devoted exclusively to educating communication professionals. 


Bachelor's Degree Programs: 

• Video • Audio • Film 
- • Print & Broadcast Journalism 
Management & Organizational Communication 
• Advertising • Public Relations 


One-year Intensive Master's Degree: 

Global Marketing Communication & Advertising 



PRANCE 


THE 

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 

OF PARIS 

SobUssemeat d’mseignemcBt svpMettr prtat 

The American University 
of Paris bas offered 
tbe finest American 
undergraduate degree 
programs in Europe 
for over 30 years. 

ftwfrrfff pfArts: Art Hbtary, Comparative 
Literature, European Cultural Studios, 

French Stuck**, Int*! Affair*, Inti Business 
Administration, Inti Economies, 

Modem History. 

Bachelor of Science: Applied Economics, 
Computer Science, new 5-year Engineering 
progra m hi cooperation with the Un i ver s i t y 
of Alabama at HuntsvRa. 

The Office of Adm issi ons, BP 101, 

31, avenue Bosquet 75007 Paris, France. 

TeL: (33/1) 40 62 07 20 fee (33/1) 47 05 34 32 


JmM*. (COLE SCPtSIECBE 

BE pubucit£ 

«* d « marketing 

HPtflrsinee Why not loam advertising 
vfr 1927 and communication 

the French way in Paris? 

In 1993/1994: Students or Prof essionals from 
28 countries, most obtained the ESP Diploma, 
the BIS { State diploma) 
the MAA Diploma, and goodjobs for young 


people motivated by the £ 

ifertNiri— opening w 
OCTOBER 101k , 1994 
Chairman: Claude CHAUVET, 
a former World President (82-84) 
of the Iatemffcaal 
Advertising Association 
Free brochures on request 
Education or Training 
tCOlE SDFl&IElIftE BE 
POBUGRfi ft MABXEfnve 

9 f ns Uo Sclftcs 75116 Paris 
friocc 

ttt 83-14.7277749 • As 47MM3S 
Telex 651 286 F 


* V. 

r* I 


, .’If t'-r 

p--ste; 





\ * N 
K > A 


UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

Schuabisch Gmund, Germany 


Degree Programs 

Bachelor of Arts (BA) ■ Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 
Master of International Management (M.I.M.) 

Study Abroad 

Academic Year • Semester • Summer 

Academic Concentrations 

Business & Management • International Studies 
German & European Studies • American Studies 
Computer Studies 

Residential Campus 

Dormitories • Dining Facility • Student Center 


MnMm Olfc*. Bo* 328 


73525 SchwBdsch GtnQnd. Gormany 
Tat +48 (TTTt) 18070 
fee +48(7171)37526 


n. contact UMUC at 

International Programs. Box 44 
UntvaraHy BM. m AdaipN Road 
Coilaga Pam. MD 20742-1644, USA 
Tat +1 (301) B85-7442 
Fax: + 1 (801) W&-7678 


A Major American University 
in the Heart of Europe 


College Credit for Work* Experience 
Business ■ Engineering ■ Education 
Earn a tactoft* nustoi doctoral degree. Grided Mepeodeut 
Sbuty. One+m-om taentor adrisore. Mo ciMSi a - 
aanlnra-reridBDCT. Call tora(«oaE«iuatai- Catalog 

(505) 839 2711 
ZG5 louufen N.E., Srile 8600, Dept- SO 
ARwqutfm. Haw Mwle# 87H0 ILSA-y 


hivefsil 


Colleges & Universities 


UNIVER5ITE DE 
PARIS SORBONNE 

Centre Experiment^ 
rfBude & la ftisafai Proteose 
aso«afUniver& 


FRANCE 




C0UR5DE 
CIVHISAHON 
FRANCAISE 
DE LA SORBONNE 


FRANCAISE 

GRADUATE COURSES | UNDSGRADUATE COURSES 


• UnwyjvGam. 

• ’MAQSfEREdelTicijsdifcGwtsalim 
Fiwcomj* [eqjfo&it to MA raft U. 5A|. 

• Soioctw Sunner Session br Farbgn 
Teachers end Suderfc 

• Cajres hr Jeadm d French taguaje 
mdGwfecdion. 

• Spetid semnen on request 


FrenA koaoWrfe lm) required 

» fimeh bigmge artiGizolan 
Caunes. 


^awjrMBdyiayy "fti. Winter ordSpriigSenassn. 

moLwcctav ] 

• Speed icfrsncn m repjesl I »Su»ner Coras.- Are to end Sep* 

Oph(MK in Economics and Commercial Studios in nodi session 
• Certincat Pratique de Francois Cotmnorckd et Econommuo" 

• "Dip&ma Stiperieur de frangau des Affah*s- 

• "Dipksme epprofoncS du Fran$ais des Affaires* 

. . 2ro part af Ihe 'ddanie jDphieur’ 

Opbmcc and eamatti nwn ne Sorboone ma die R»» Oxxnber of Commote ori hdetty. 
Rerident visa required. Inquire at the Cultural section of the French Embassy. 

Apply » COURS DE CIVtUSAItON FRANCAISE, 
i 47 rue des Ecoles, 75005 ftris. TiL: (33-1) 40 46 22 1 1 - Fate (33-1)4046 3229- 


” Providing a imdn-cvlturai a 
man II acre campus *iih 


there, uahiltty and security 
'era reridertital facilities ' 


University degree programs 

(A.A^ B JL, as^ M.aA.) Id: 

Liberal Arts ■ International Business Administration 
Economics • International Political Studies 
French Language, Literature and Civilization 

F>dly accredarP ^ ACtCS Ihuktngto* DC. L'S.t 

Collegium Palatinum courses in Intensive Fre nch 

Preparatory program for nniversity entrance: 

«VMgned for those seeking lo complete their JK. 

lost year of secondary school in a university 1 i*. s -V J 

atmosphere. Small, tutorial type courses \ r g 

catering to individual needs. 

The American CoBege of Swttzariand 

Dept HT / ACS3, CH-18S4 Leysin ^EStT 

Tel: (025) 34 22 23 • Fax (025)34 1348 


REPUBLIC OP IRELAND 


EamcoII^aediisi^eiT^QldHT^Dnbl^ ___ 
friendly cily of yotmg people and 3 hotne-3way-tanh(Kne^^?g| 

PROGRAMS FOR 

•CbDegeStadents- Summer -Fafl-Sfriig 

• En^ish language Studies Yec^Roimd gflEft 

• SpedaJ Summer Scftedufc 6>r H^t School Student i 

Lynn University 

Stoly Aired htyw 36011. MRitW, Boa 8den,A33431l» 
1-400-453-4346 • 1-407-994-0770, exL 2W • MX 1-407-994-6821 


fm 



Leicester 

University 


MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT by Distance Learningl 


M.B.A. and graduate DIPLOMA form pan of an inle- 
graied programme of management study, developed by 
the University, which enables managers at all levels to 
develop their careers with formal recognition. Held in 
the highest academic regard, the University of 
Leicester has an international reputation with students 
from a diversity of nationalities and cultures. 
For further details contact the University's appointed handling agents: 

Resource Development International (TRI) 

10 Mercia Business Village, Westwood Heath 
Co v entry CV4 8HX, United Kingdom. 

TeL: 444 (0)203 422422 . 

Fax: +44 (0)203 422423 l/L 


BE A WRITER OR JOURNALIST 


Specialist courses covering Journalism, 
Fiction or Feature Writing and English for 
Business. Home study by post or attend our 
NUJ recognised courses in London. Overseas 
students welcome. Prospectus from: 


The London School of Journalism 

Dept. HT. 22 Ipbrook Mews. Bass wafer. lO.YDOi'V, TV2 3HG 
Tel.: rii 71 706 3536 Fax: +44 71 706 3780 


CANADA 


THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 

mmsimrnMmcam, uuu 


Year-round English programs 
m a spectacular soring. 

Fully accredited. 


Alta Grime Jmow 

En^jfe Language bamiie. HT94 

5997 Iona Drive 

Vaecocver, BC Ouda V6T 121 
Tel: (604)22-5208 
Rx; (604» 222-52B 


, r -. ??, Kl'* 1 




Spend the Summer in Boston 
at Tufts University , ■ H 

sea® . _ whr—s^i-^ 


tn^ fllllUH 


tufts 

SBSKSsar--. — ~ 


IUHTID KUfODOM 



Joan Hookings 

Albcn College 

160 Dundu.NI. Wc<f. Beltonlle, 
OmaikiKH 1 1A6 
CL: 613-968-5726 - Fa* 6l+*ft965 


Summer S«i«w 

. Hnhdat Uuvpase Canes 



RrvanuH* 

,o . i h u -jt -AL * na-lld» Me ^ ri|»" ** 

j J j u |> i..h Aucirf "E'L. ‘ sSlhhrtY ’ Hate***** V*" «nJ EhIuk- 

'^'''""■'Sd FOT FREE our VIDEO! 

•n,. ■ Tel/Fax:: (44> (863) 9,2149 ^ 






^ mk 


i 5 campuses 
across Europe 


;>y, European U n i v e r s i t y 

INTERNATIONAL BT'SINLSS SCHOOL 








Write, call or foe 

Amerikalei 131. B-2000 Antwerp. Belgium. 

Tefc 32 3 218 54 31 Fax 32 3 218 58 68 
Ruede Livoume 116-120, B-1050 Brussels. Belgium. 
Tet 32 2 648 67 81 Fax: 32 2 648 59 68 
CaJle Ganduxer 70, E-O802I Barcefona, Spain. 

Tel: 34 3 201 81 71 Fax 34 3 20 ! 79 35 


, Please send documentation about the following 
j European University business courses. 

j □ Undergraduate programs (BBA, BIS, BA) 

J □ Graduate programs (MBA. MIS, MA) 

i Name 

I Address 


IHT 5/4 


(campus) 


ITALY 

IQHN CABOT 


JOHN CABOT 
UNIVERSITY 

An American University 
in the Heart of Rome 

■ Bachelor's degrees In Art History, Business Administra- 
tion. English Literature and International Affairs. 

■ Quarter Calendar with five-week Summer Session: Begin 
studies In September. January. April, or June. 

■ Study Abroad & Transfer Students welcome. 

■ International student body from over 30 different coun- 
tries. 

■ Advanced Placement lor international Baccalaureate, Ma- 
turity, or equivalent diplomas. 

■ American Language Program: Intensive English language 
preparation for university admission. 

John Cabot University is affiliated with Hiram College in 
Ohio. Siudents may study abroad at other American univer- 
sities while working toward their degrees. Many graduates 
pursue Master's degree programs at top universities in trie 
United States and Europe. 

For further information contact 
John Cabot University 
Via detia Lungarar233 - 00165 Rome - ITALY 
Tel. +396/6878881 - Fax +396/6832088 


ITALY 


THE 

i AMERICAN 
UMVERSfTY 
• OF ROME 



, Center For 
i University Studies 


'DEGREE PROG RAMS 


AA Interdisciplinary Studies 
A.A.A. Business Administration 
B.BjA. International Business 
B A. International Relations 
B.A. Italian Studies 
BA. Interdisciplinary Studies 


SUMMER SESSIONS 


SEMESTER STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM 
HOUSING IN STUDIO APARTMENTS 

Tl» American Unimratty at Rone is accndfiwl 
by the towdittifl Ctoncff 
tor tadmadenl Cdieges and Sduwto 
and tmfSWd wWiiraior US. tosttBition*. 

For fwther information contact: 
American Unrverefty of Rome 
OapL 601, Via Pietro floseffi 44NH53 Roma, Rafy 
TeL 06/583 3091 9 -Far 06/58330992 



Associate, Bachelor’s 
and Master’s degrees 

at oir campuses in 

Florida • London • Strasbourg • Paris 
Heidelberg ■ Berlin • Madrid • Engetberg 

and at the 

American College of Switzerland, Leysin 


Business Administration 
and other business majors 
International Hotel / Tourism Management 
International Relations / Diplomacy 
Computer Systems Management - Economics 
Psychology ■ Public Administration 
Engineering Management 
Pre -Medicine • Commercial Art • Liberal Arts 
French, Berman 

F/rCaUleaWmbookorlnfaniiaaondWKirWritaorcaB: 


SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 

Dept HT.'GU * ST Waterloo Road • LondonSEl STX * England 



Earn Your American 
University Degree 
at a College in London 

Study Business Administration, Commensal 
Art, Fashion Design, Fashion Marketing, 
Interior Design, and Video Production 

You’ll feel right at home studying with other American 
and international students who have chosen The 
American College jn London. 

With an international student body, The American 
College caters to your persona/ and educational 
needs. We put emphasis on an education for your 
career with specialized courses in every aspect of 
your field, contacts with top professionals, famous 
guest lecturers, and exposure to real world situations 


U.S. accredited and degree granting. Terms begin 
October, January, March, June, and July. Housing and 
job placement services available. Study abroad 
opportunities to sister campuses in Atlanta and Los 
Angeles. 

The American College confers university-level 
bachelor's and associate degrees. For further 
information or a prospectus, contact 

F'Y The American College 
M in London 

110 Marylebone High Street 
Smmd London W1M3DB England 
Tel. (071) 486-1772 
FAX: (071) 935-8144 

Classes begin October, January, March, June, July 
Please senda prosgedus to: 


Slate/Country 


Zlp/PbsWCoda 























I I B I C kS I . I xxooo«aoofloo©QMii*«mm«mummnnnn*rwnw**i.m* H*wwnu*HWonaSuw™n.teWju-om«te$M-maTOM*OT^ 


P 

I 


a 


On 

F 


W 

Afc 


o 



Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION: SPECIAL DIRECTORY 


Schools 


REPUBLIC OF IRELAND 


ARAVON SCHOOL: PREPARING CHILDREN FOR 
EDUCATION SINCE 1862 

TRADITIONAL VALUES IN A MODERN ATMOSPHERE 

The cWesl preparatory school In Ireland. Aravon stands in 15 acres o> terraced 
lawns, playing fields plus an all-weather pitch It offers co-ed ucat tonal and Inter- 
denominational preparaiory education- full or weekly boa rcftngfor8- 1 2+ and day 
facilities for boys and girls 3 - 1 2+ 

* Small classes, with well qualified and dedicated staff 

* Preparation for 12+ Common entrance and Irish Secondary 

* Long tradition of Science. Music Languages. Arts and Sport 


F ora prospectus, write, fax or telephone: Mr. &Mts. T. C. K. OjMallej% 


Aravon School, Old Conna. Bray. Co. Wlddow. Republic of Ir 
Telephone: International access +353- 1 -282 1355. Fax: +353-1-282 1242. 



A multilingual school 

in the center of Paris 

from kindergarten fiiron^i 9th grade 

Multilingual teaching 
of studies, sports and arts daily. 

Each subject instructed in a different language: 

English, French and German. 

TeL: 40.70.1181 - Fax: 40.70.91.07 
5, rue de Lubeck, 75116 PARIS - FRANCE 


r 


THE LENNEN BILINGUAL SCHOOL 

65 Quni d'Orsjy. Pans 7th - Founded «n I960 

Creative active program in small family atmosphere. 
Children from 2 ,n to 8 yeare old. 

French and English Primary Section. 

Summer school. For information, call: 47.05.66.SS 



INTOMAnONJUi 



TASIS-since 1955, 
the education to 
succeed in a 
changing world: 


• Challenging U.S. 
curriculum 

• Extensive travel, 
sports and arts 

• Students from 40 
countries, ages 4—18 

• Foreign languages 
and cultural studies 

• Exciting & diverse 
summer programs 

• Superb campuses in 
Switzerland, England, 
and Greece 


Hie American School 

in Switzerland 
CH6926 Montagnola 
TeL- 41 91 546471 
Fas 41 91 542364 




UJJL 


With the right help 

college is 
an option 





BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL 


A chaiten gin g French or English 
es & Second Language 
Summer Program for roar child 


The Lab School of Washington, 

internationally recognized as a 
leading force in the field of learning 
disabilities. understands the long- 
ing of the learning disabled student 
to graduate from high school and 
to go on to college. 

Working in partnership with 
Mount Vernon College, a small 
four-year liberal arts college for 
women. The Lab School has 
designed a program to bridge the 
gap between high school and col- 
lege. This “thirteenth' year intro- 
ductory college program supplies 
intensive remedial instruction, an 
individualized support system, 
ana a structured, stimulating envi- 
ronment to help the learning dis- 
abled woman make a successful 
transition into college. 

For further information contact: 

Bridging the Cap Program 
The Lab School erf Washington 
4759 Reservoir Road, N.W. 
Washington, D.C 20007 
TEL: (202) 965-6600 
FAX: (202) 965-8819 


Our summer language causes have born 
mating d* needs of toys and girls, aged 11 to 
15, for thirty-three yean. Experienced 
teachers wffl provide opponuumes far extea- 
sht practice a »riuea and spobs French cr 
English, while co n cen t rat i ng mention oo the 
infiridoal needs of each siidea. Becrcatxnai 
activities, both on and off anr ampns. and 
field trips provide addmoml learning oppor- 
tunities and encour^e a better cuhnral mder- 
standng between the students. Hus year's 
Sumner School will ran from lone 26th to 
My 23rd 1994. 


THE NETHERLANDS 


Ttefotenatfaaa] Secondary 
SdudEofloranlSSE 


An English metftum secondary school 
<11-18). preparing students far die IGCSE 
IB Ontanuriknal Bocca- 


Spedal FadUes ESJ_ First Lan- 

H Japanese. Internationa] Youth 
tbeatreproduWjns.LfeJJnkEnvf- 
nnniennadMifes, adnata rarem guid- 
ance, and an Ahmni assodsUon. 


! tts redos has 700,000 
re tn me south of The 


inhabitants and fees 

Netherlands, dose to Belgian and Germa- 
ny. The area han econonicalyalroi^ ‘Enr- 
oregon’. 

Adnissfoos Ihroughoii the jiear. Pface- 
ment tests, previous school roods and 
bdentens required 

BSE 

Jernafemlaan L 5625 FF findfaoran 
The Nefedaads 

TeL +31.401413600 Fax 424973 


UJJL 


PUTNEY SCHOOL 


Elm Lea Farm 
Putney. VT 05346 
802/387-6219 


Student Exchange 


Study In tba United State, 
Academic year and 
shOft-SEay pros rams 
with host families 
throughout the U.S. 


III 


Pnonei 70B-3 77-2272 

Fax. 708-377- 2307 
42W273 Reveal Court 
_Si. Charier. il 60 i 75 


Eric H. Dcfdun, Director «T Summer School 
E&sbop's College School 
Lemjtncvilk:, Quebec JIM 1Z8 
Td.: (819) S66-Q2Z7. ext 207 
Fix: 1819) 822-8917 

B.C5. a i itnbaol metonml kM saatd ■ 
Emm Tondapi, q paiMMt fr 160 bn fan Moaned. 


INTERNATIONAL BOARDING 
SCHOOL IN SALZBURG 


Salzburg International Preparatory School offers a challenging 
coed American college prep & International Baccalaureate 
curriculum for students aged 12 to 18. Fully accredited. 
Excellent university placement record. Intensive English 
courses aid non-native speakers. Boarding enhanced by 
extensive sports, recreation, culture and travel programs. For 
full information please contact: 

Salzburg International Preparatory School 
Moosstrasse 106 A, A-5G20 Salzburg, Austria 
1WL (662) 824617 - Fax: 824555 - Telex 632476 


FRANCE 


Iotermtional Bilingual School of Provence 


BOngual Curriculum French Baccafcxiraab 
Primary and Secondary: 1CCSE, A level*. SAT. TOEFL FCE, CPE.. 
A hecttiy batanee ol 2SO French and EngHsti spooking students ut in 
the calm Provencal oaunfryafde. 

INTERIIflTIOtfRL STODY CfltfP Owing school vocations centred on 
learning French In total branenton vrilti sports, drama adhacd tourism. 


CIPEC 


Maher of tin 
■ Of 


DomiH da RmivMM. Luyim Emmlnottai Cratm to 

13060 Mi-eD-Pnrvencs. Franca. tWvmltr ol ComtxMgs. 

TeL (16} 4224.0340 EnmtrartoA Centre tor 

Fax: (16)42^4.09 £ I Aiwrtam SHfntaaflou. 

Day schooling - Banding tacOHe*. 


SWITZERLAND 



JOHN F. KENNEDY 
INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL 

Saanen-Gstsad -Founded 1949 
A unique MemaHonal school far cNktai B-14 yarn. Sound preparation for Engfah 
language secondary schools. Smafl classes, fandy atmosphere, superb alpuie 
(ocatfon. French, daily slang ri winter, spoils and excursions. 

Sommer camp Juty-Augost 

Write W.Lotg, greeter, P32Saenafl.5wtewtsiid.Tsfc (41^ 4 13 72. Fax {41-30)4 89 82. 


Schools 


Cooking Schools 






^OBK SQJq 

(an independent school) 





“COME AND SEE HOW GOOD 
A SCHOOL CAN BE!” 

An independent co-ed ucational day school for 
Grades 1 through 8. The school is committed to 
the development fo the total student, offering a 
broad curriculum which emphasizes academic 
excellence as well as an oustanding programme 
in athletics and the arts. 


Applications are now being accepted for September, 1995. 
Contact tbe school for a tour and an interview. 


Director of Admissions 
65 Sheldrake Boulevard 
Toronto, Ontario 
416-485-0541 


THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE 


Tomorrow's diploma is international 
qualifies for study at universities throughout 
the world 

(English is the IB's language of instruction) 
Salem offers both: German Abitur and the IB 
We would gladly send you further information 


SchuieSchtass Salem _ "1 D-B8682Satem/Gefrnany 

co-educattona» XQ I pi|| Phone (07563)81337 

boenfing school LJ CU. VIRILE Fax (07553 ) 8138 0 

Member of the International Round Squcre Conference and 


VJJL 



OXFORD W ACADEMY 


ONE STUDENT, ONE MASTER IN EACH CLASS 


For boys 14-20 of average lo superior intelligence who have 
academic deficiencies, who heve lost one or more years of 


school; who wish to accelerate; or foreign students wishing to 

Ihriduaiir 


enter American universities. E.S.L. Completely individual in- 
struction in a private classroom setting. Roflirig admissions. 

Swnmer Session, June ISJuly 22, 1994: $4,20000 
1994-5 School Yean 532^00.00 

EDUCATIONAL PROBLEM SOLVERS SINCE 1906 
Dept IH • Box P,- Westbrook, CT 06498 USA ■ (203) 399-6247 


Art Cu-linaire 
PARIS 18 9 5 



gastronomy.. 

PI • Catering i 

New course in five intensive weeks 
from November 1 4th to December 17th. 

•The Classic Cycle s 

Study cuisine and pastry in comprehensive 
10-11 week courses that begin firnr times a year. 


PARIS • LONDO N • T O K Y O 


8 rue Leon Delhomme 

7501$ Pans 

Phone 33/1 48 56 06 06 
Fax 33/1 48 56 03 96 


114 MaryUbone Lane 
London WIM6HH 

Phone 44/71 935 35 03 
Fax 44/71 935 76 21 


i. all loilav for a free school brochure or gifr c.K;rloi;uc- 
of our gourmets products. I SA : 1 -SOU— lb t d ib.F 



LEARN FRENCH CUISINE 
& PASTRY IN FRANCE 


ESPACE 

F R I A N P 


* Intensive up-grading courses 

* 1, 6 or 12-week extensive courses 
+ Small classes, caring environment 

* Practical training provided 

* Enrollment open year round 


AdaS& Executive Education 


A 


// 


Masteres Specialises 
programs (MS) 


// 


Specialized ”Masferes' are onerear programs which allow 
university graduates to acquire expertise in a specific Field of 
management. 

These programs are designed in collaboration with 
businesses and contribute to the development of management 
techniques in the high technology sectors of industry. 
Deadline for application :May I4fh 1994. 


ESCP MBA Part-Time 


The ESCP MBA is an 18 month part time program 
compatible with professional lire for young executives 
holding university degrees and with 5 to 10 years of 
professiond experience. Tnts program wil begin 'n Jcnuary 1 995. 
Deadbne for application : June 1st 1994. 


To request a brochure end an app lic ation fo 
LsabeJte du MERLE : (33) 14923 20 18 


form : 




US 




pune^Hne 


I 


tIOIIM ESCP 


ULSJL 


MBA for 

Wforking Professionals 


An advanced degree to enhance your 
career without interrupting it 


> One-week on-campus terms coupled with off-campus 
tutorials to meet the needs of busy adults. 

> Individualized concentrations in International 'Cade, 
Healthcare Admintstration, Marketing, Finance, and 
Human Resources. 

Curriculum fix students with diverse back g rounds and 
experience. 

> Financial aid available. 


The University of Sarasota 


5250 17th Street, Suite #3, Sanuotd, Florida 34235, USA 


813 - 379-0404 


Fax # 813 - 379-9464 

■li mn I I iClfct* 


.... Adult & Executive Education ■ 


INTOMATtOCUU. 


Brussels • Israel • Rome • Spain • Paris • London 


Chart a Course for Success 


••• 


-.The w 
difficu 

H\ 


—The waters of international business and commerce are 
difficult to navigate. Let us guide you through the ebb and 
flow of global change. 


MTV 



Boston University International Graduate Centers 
ombine a traditicwi of academic excellence with a rich 
diversity of resources to provide students with an 
exceptional educational experience 

* • Master of Science in Management 

• Master of Arts in International Relations 

• Convenient Part-time Classes 

• Admission in January, April and September 

Spain 


32-2-2680037 34-76-471979 


London Israel 

44-71-938 1540 972-7-231144 

Paris Rome 

33-1-43350060 39-6-6833262 

Boston University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action wriOrtfew. 


BOSTON 


UNIVERSITY 


Write: 755 Commonwealth Ave., 

Rm. 105, Boston, MA, 02215, USA 


Harvard University 



John £ Kennedy 
School of Government 


I INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE “I 


or PARIS 

Bachelor of Science in 
International Hotel Management 


Master of Science in 
International Hotel Management 


Lull Time /Part Time - Claves k^in : OetoIxT 1994 
1 ku.-an;.; a'. ailaMe 
CONiAiT: 

NT.:« imijit: ?OL RN'iHS 
Ti l ( i ) 43 3s m (O . Fax ( I M3 34 09 3 3 
37 i 39 Rt. c Saint Si/b.ssth-.n 73011 P,\i-:js . FranctJ 



HOSTA 

HOTEL AND TXHJ1USM MANAGEMENT 
SCHOOL, SWITZERLAND 

35 yean of experimlX - Transfer trrdili to US ard Eanpecn Unhmilia 

• Hotel Diploma Courses -I to 2 yra 
1 Travrf and Tourism Diploma Courses - 1 to 2 yrs 


* . 



•Weekly workshops. 
•Daily demonstrations. 

•Summer classes. 
•Introduction to French 


For further information, contact 

Espace Briand, 2 avenue de Za CrisfaUeriev 92310 Sevres 

Phone: 33/1 4&23J7J7 -Fate 33/1 4623J&7D 


I i * 

■ y« i!i ■ 



: i 





iaform^ion canto,* HOSTA Hold and ToorUm School, 

1854 H Leyrin, Switeeriand, TeL: +41-25-34261 1. Fax: 441-25-341821 



? 4 




j 

i 


!■ t 

• I 
( 

l 


! 


!C. 

t; 


Executive Education Programs in 
Public Policy and Public Management 


Senior Managers in Government A three- 
week August 1994 program for senior public 
executives in the U.S. federal government 
and their foreign government counterparts. 

Senior Executive Fellows An eight-week 
fell 1994 program for upper-level managers 
in the federal government and their foreign 
government counterparts. 


For brochures and information call or write: 
Phyllis Provost McNeil, Director 
Harvard University 

John F. Kennedy School of Government 
79 John F. Kennedy Street 
Cambridge, MA 01 138 USA 
Phone: 61 7-496-4*47 
Fax:617-496-6241 ' 


























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL S, 1994 





Dublin’s Reynolds: Staying Afloat in a Sea of Troubles 







: : 1 C W 

aA\ce 



By James F. Clarity 

New Tiork Times Service 

DUBLIN — When historians 
evaluate this period in Ireland, sup- 
porters of Prime Minister Albert 
Reynolds hope that he will be 
praised as the leader who brought 
peace to the island after 700 years 
I#? intermittent war. 

w But if he fails in his effort to end 
the current phase of that war — die 

25 years of killing in the British 
province of Northern Ireland — he 
could be relegated to a footnote: a 
pet-food manufacturer and dance 
nail impresario who was known to 
dress in a cowboy suit and sing a 
Tun Reeyes country-western howler 
that begins: “Put your sweet lips a 
little closer to the phone" 

Mr. Rejrnolds, 61 , said in a re- 
cent interview that he was no more 
ashamed of that than Bill Clinton 
was of playing the saxophone. 

He acknowledged the similari ty 
to another American president, 
Harry S. Truman — when remind-' 
ed that his detractors had said that 
the job of running this country of 
3.5 million people would be loo 
much for him. 

There were these who said he 
doesn't know about Northern Ire- 
land, he doesn’t have a grasp of it,” 
Mr. Reynolds said. Those were 
proved wrong." 

Although peace is still far from 
assured, the peace efforts of Mr. 
Reynolds and Prime Minister John 
Major of Britain are still alive. 

Mr. Reynolds is widely credited 
with haying helped nudge the Irish 
Republican Army toward a more 
moderate course. The IRA an- 


Malay^-ThaUandExercue 

The Aoociated Press 

KUALA LUMPUR — The na- 
vies and marine police units of Ma- 
laysia and Thailand began a five- 
day joint training exercise Monday 
to help iron out communications 
difficulties. About 300 men and 
eight vessels, four from each coun- 
try, are joining in the exercise in 
waters off Langkawi Island in Ma- 
laysia and Satun and Phuket Is- 
lands in Thailand. 


nounced on Wednesday that it 
would observe a 72-hour cease-fire 
in Northern Ireland this week. 

At a ceremony in Belfast on Sun- 
day celebrating the 78th annivezsa- 
>7 of the Easier Rising, Gerry Ad- 
ams, head of Sinn Fein, the IRA's 
political wing, said that the cease- 
fire could lead to peace if Mr. Ma- 
jor used it to talk to Sinn Fein. 

Mr. Reynolds is struggling with a 
troubled economy andooe of the 
highest unemployment rates in the 
European Union, about 19 percent. 
But he defends his government 

“This is the most stable govern- 
ment Ireland has had for years, " he 
said, referring to the coalition part- 
nership between his Hanna Fail 
and the Labor Party. Together, 
they have a margin of 37 votes in 
the 1 66-seat lower house of parlia- 
ment, the largest in Ireland's 72 
years of independence. 

Mr. Reynolds, who had been fi- 
nance minister, became prime min- 
ister in February 1992 after a strug- 
gle in which the popular Quarles J. 
Haughey was pushed out of the 
party leadership. He was immedi- 
ately hit with an international scan- 
dal. A pregnant 14-year-old who 
said she had been raped by the 
father of a friend wanted to have an 
abortion in Britain. Abortion is 
outlawed in Ireland. 

In this overwhelmingly Roman 
Catholic country, Mr. Reynolds 
was caught between groups de- 
manding further liberalization and 
those opposed to abortion. He is a 
practicing Catholic and bad never 
been known as a liberal, and his 
advisers told him to leave the issue 
to the courts. But he put the ques- 
tion to a referendum in June 1992, 
and it established the right of wom- 
en to abortion information and to 
travel abroad for abortions. 

On the same day, Irish voters 
approved the Treaty on European 
Unity, giving it a fillip just when it 
seemed to be in trouble elsewhere 
in Europe. 

At the end of the year, he called 
for a general election in which his 
party did poorly, and his career at 
the top seemed finished. Bat he 
turned the defeat into victory, bar- 
gaining with Labor to keep the 
prime minister's job and power 



. . iAOt $ 


! cufjabf** 

BUPWS 




I'juII-pA Tik ?n>* 


MASKED MESSENGER — A member of the Irish Republican Army reading a statement at an Easter ceremony in a cemetery in the 
bonier town of Crossmaglen, Northern Ireland. The IRA has called a unilateral 72-hour cease-fire beginning at midnight Tuesday. 

ful cabinet posts for his party, he went to a college in Countv can. And while he can no longer be on the distribution of condoms and 
Last April, he the new Sligo, then into the pet-food bust- persuaded to ring in public, he will has decriminalized homosexuality^ 
peace initiative by carrying secret ness, which is still being operated on request redte a poem. “He has done extremely wdu, 

proposals to Mr. Major from Mr. by one of his seven children. He ran He has promised to take on the said Tun Pat Coogan, a historian 
Adams and John Hume, the most for parliament and worked his way issue of divorce with a referendum and author of a standard work at 
influential moderate Catholic lead- up within the system. next fall, another issue so sticky the IRA who had criticized Mr. 

cr in the North. The proposals As he has in his political life, he that his critics say it will divide the Reynolds for not bring knowledge- 
to him through Mr. Hume, a has made changes in his personal country and result in his defeat He able enough about the North, 
friend. Since then he has been a life. A chain smoker, he quit. He bas made it clear to tbe country’s “In a way, it’s like Nixon and 
negotiator between Sinn Fein and gave up his soft-drink habit when powerful bishops that he will not China,” Mr. Coogan continued, re- 
London, and both sides have he learned he was a diabetic and bow to their pressure in all matters, fening to the peace effort “He may 
praised him. now consumes dozens of cups of Since he has been prime minister, be the only one people and pouu- 

A native of the Irish midlands, tea daily and swims whenever he the parliament has liberalized laws dans can trust to get the job done. 


can. And while he can no longer be 
persuaded to ring in public, he will 
on request recite a poem. 

He has promised to take on the 
issue of divorce with a referendum 
next fall, another issue so sticky 
that his critics say it will divide the 
country and result in his defeat He 
bas made it clear to tbe country’s 
powerful bishops that he will not 
bow to their pressure in all matters. 
Since he has been prime minister, 
the parliament has liberalized laws 


on the distribution of condoms and 
has decriminalized homosexuality. 

“He has done extremely well,” 
said Tim Pal Coogan, a historian 
and author of a standard work cm 
the IRA who had criticized Mr. 
Reynolds for not bring knowledge- 
able enough about the North. 

“In a way, it's like Nixon and 
China," Mr. Coogan continued, re- 
ferring to the peace effort. “He may 
be the only one people and politi- 
cians can trust to gel the job acne.” 




Kiun vn* tht «tH i«v mu ua m auuntw mr 

If you would like to receive farther infor- 
mation on airy of the advertisers in todays 
Education Special Directory, simply com- 
plete the coupon below and send it to: 

BROOKE PIL.LEY, 
International Herald Tribune 
181, Avenue Charles de Gaulle, 
92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. 


Adult & Executive Education 

France □ U5A □ 

Art & Design Schools 

TULA. □ 

Colleges & Universities 
Canada □ Eire □ Prance □ 

Germany □ Holland □ 17. K. □ 

usa. a 


Cooking Schools 
France □ 

Hotel Management Schools 
Switzerland □ 

Language Schools 

Belgium □ France □ UX 

Switzerland □ UJS-fi. □ 


Schools 

Austria 

Ranee 

U.SJL 


□ Canada □ Eire □ 

□ Germany □ Holland □ 

□ Switzerland □ 


Summer Camps 
U8A □ 

Summer Study 

France □ UX 

Student Exchange 

USA □ 


□ USA □ 




INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION: SPECIAL DIRECTORY 


jeme-Tit 
i Switzerland 

S.e'-s— 2. 

: ..;} 


C:..:2S£ \ f 




■ North American SummerCamps 





i a*: v: ^f 1 ! 


. I 


iLSJL 


In New England, 
art imitates life. 

Located in southern New England, 

Rhode Island offers some of the finest 
beaches on the East Coast of the United 
States, beautifully preserved colonial vil- 
lages and the cultural richness of Provi- 
dence and Newport. But if those don't 
convince you to study here this summer, 
maybe these will: the Rhode Island 
School of Design's 1994 Summer 
Art and Design Programs. 

SanmHTStiidinProqrMD For art students, 
artists and art educators with a full 
selection of intensive college credit 
courses. 

Pre-Coll«t> Proqrao For high school juniors 
and seniors, fine art and design courses 
with a choice of studio concentration. 

tijUiJUtEdiKitiH For practicing art 
teachers (K-12), three-year summer 
residency program. 

BtSB Study Travel Programs Architecture and 
art in Rome, graphic design in 
Switzerland and fine arts in France. 


For a free catalog of RISD summer programs, 
call 24 hours: (local international access cocfe)- 
1.401-454-6200, or fax coupon: (local International 
access code)-l -401-454-6218 or mail coupon to: 
RISD, Continuing Education, 2 College Street 
providence, Rl, USA 02903-2787. 


Street 

City — 

Province/County 

Country — 

Telephone 


UJJL 


U*SJL 


SCHOOL OF THE 

Quseum of fine arts, 

BOSTON 



SUMMER 

DISCOVERY 

jRvjf a*. 

■■ . B.C.LA •• 
U.OFVERMOtiT 

U.OFWCHtW 


M U S \ 0 § 

T ° frl.- \ 

CANADA 2 


uwnDeniv. ISRAEL 

Enridm^^l^^edfcjftinceton Active omping.donn, hotel and 
Review SM.^Jols.lStewitb tennis, combination student tours. Summer 

trips, conmuflity««ice; skiing, climbing, sports ft more! 

Where liarninefisfuri •; 2B$sr! ACA Accredited 


MED-O-LARK CAMP 


SELECTION OF OVER 70 ACTIVITIES 


CO-ED 11-16 IN BEAUTIFUL MAINE 


We are an established international 200 camper community English language lessons 
available. Excellent facilities on 4-mile lake instruction ai all levels m tennis, sailing 
windsurfing, water-skiing, comprehensive drama and dance sirring aris and sports 
plus more. Canada and Rafting trips Choice delicious meals. Our 23rd year 
ACA accredited 4 & B weeks We will meet camper at U S airport Camp is a joy 
For brochure and video contact 
Med -O-Lark Camp. 334 Beacon Si . Boston. MA flBilfi 
617-267-3483 or FAX’ 617-659-9740 


Enrfchrrt^npatid travel by the Musiker Family 


t( 

J 


Summer Courses in Boston, 
France, Ireland, England, Japan & Wales 


A UNIQUE SUMMER LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE 

PINE TREE LANGUAGE CAMPS 

of Lynn University 

(HAVE FUN WHILE LEARNING A NEW LAJMGUAGE1 
The Adimndxda, New York • Boa Rzbnt, Honda * Dublin, Ireland 


LYNN UNIVERSITY 

^ PINE TREE CAMPS 

JA. Boca Raton, FL • Adirondack Mts.. NY 

SOCCER • TENNIS 
/ • Intensive instruction by age group 

y • Nationally recognized college coaches 

"^EXCELLENT WATERFRONT AND MODERN FACOJTIES 
3601 N.MiEny ThriL Boca Raton, FL *(407)994-6662 *(800)251-2267 



(617) 267-1219 


y.-\cz. :':.e Vx.e . :• ' 

23C ’.'5 vr. V..\ C 2 i ' 5 


33431-5598 
• HOE 407-994-6821 






THE SCHOOL OF 4k FASHION DESIGN 


1 EXCEL AT WILLIAMS CO 


M=K= 


•Ali, LAS 


EARN J 

AH SFD CERTIFICATE /DIPLOMA .1 
IN LESS THAU OWE YEAS . . 


BEGIN U 

W JOBE. SEPTEMBER 
OH JANUARY \ 

ENROLL ,S 

IB PHOFESSIOMAL-TECHHICAL f j 
a APPLIED -ART COURSES « 


STUDY 

ON FASHJCJHABLE NEWBURY ST 
IN BOSTON ; 

, WORK 

k HI AH APPRENTICESHIP 

’ ATTEND 

DAYS AKD/OR ETCHINGS 

use' 

SID'S LIFETIME FREE 
PLACEMENT SERVICE 


PBS* ARE (or college Iff 

LEARN though jKthwpwtkfpMlm to snwBdaaMSfTMMrc, mam 

ENJOY (he^ESMrwJ^ESalSngJSjSIIttawI And mlBnl opportuiWct 
develop &mi»gW«rtidrfil p« Mart: Swgent Director 

A Program op JFgSl Exca at wuiams college 

FtrmrSniHwrTum Ipgl 8ox 12. ft/tney, VT U-iA OEKIS 

wns43«>YEAR 802-387-5885 or FAX 802-387-4776 


CAMP REDWOOD 


r 


L— * 

BEUHUM/ FRANCE 


DO you want concrete results ^ 
in » foreign language ’ 



■\ 

I a r * L^^^ frOTltey “ se ^' l,88te ' ! 

■ • All programmes include: | 

i a : i 

1 " hav^leamt in ll« company of rath* teadnrs; | 

I C / . gocio^yjltural activibBS. ■ 


136 KEHBDBX ST., BOSTON. MA 02116 
(C17I S3S-9343 


UiHTCD UNGOOM 


Sels College London 

RCCDGMSBPSYlHEBSfllSHCCILt^Dl ABELS 



Compnter-Ed* HIGH-TECH 

• Build o PC • Repair a PC ■ Radio 
Controlled Cars & Boats ■ Computer 
P r ogr a m ming • Radcets • Telecommunications 


• Keyboarding ■ W/P • Animation • Home 8. 
Interior Design ■ Recreation • Sports • Basltetbod 
Cfinfc • Drama • Trips • tennis lessons • English 
as a Second Language Program and more! 


n 

32 Horses ■ Farm 
Friendly Mature Staff 
Wilderness & Canoe Drips 
Sailing ■ Fun Sports ■ 90th Year 
English Tutoring ■ Horse Shows! 

GHs-Bagps Hi 4 or* weeks 

Jack & Sarah Swan 
Z03-77S98&5 ■ 2QB-74&7984aR 
Box 501 6R BrookfleM. CT. 06804 


(6.1 7) 938 6970 
COMPUTER-ED 
P.O. BOX 177 
WESTON, MA 
02193 



NATIONAL CAMP assoc 

Camp Advisory 
Service 

FIND THE RIGHT CAMP 
THIS SUMMER! 

AT NO COST TO YOU 

■ 9mimr OnrnL Spwuliy. 
Acukndc A. Trtvrl 

■ Specific Rcuoncndiliai, lo 
Qiubty Accredited Ompi 

■ CareplHc lnfonMrton and 
Pmonalucd Cwdancc 

• BwNCACddrw Choown* 
an Accrcdblad Camp 

^ National Camp Aaaoc. 

1-M0-966-CAMP 
la NY: 212-6*5-0653 
Fav 914-.154-S50t 
610 FIFTH AVE • NY. NY • 10185 


Language Schools 


swmnu» 



,.^."•2 5S-- 1 


■nru.lcoun^° 

Jf ona ' 


■ From begfaiMW to UnbenHy of Crtihridge 
»Accooadiodafionansng«d 


6M5 LONG ACSECOVBffGABiaL UDNDON WCM9JH 
FAX: 071 379 5793 

Pifadpol Y. Im, BA, Me pcori, FJJ^ ME& BonrbkroHaw 


• suem-vu 11 "''" — 

Centres in France, Belgium. Ireland and Spain. 

Languages: French. MiBn ’ 

3 Japanese and English. 

Belgium: Imensive French «maa for young people 
aged front 13 to is. 


fl 


? tf 


CERAN *4 

Avenue do Ctiheau, 284 

B-tSCOSPA 

Tet (SI (QJ 87 79 tj 2 
Fto (32) (0) B7 79 11 88 



I CBRANJ 

Since 1975 


Jn USA :T«L (413) 584 0334 
Fax (413) 584 3046 
fn&ritarilNl: _ 

TaL (41) 21 3235 397 
Fax (41) 21 3117 403 


FKANCC 

i The most renowned school for French H 

INSTITUT DE fRANfAIS 

i INTENSIVE COMPLETE IMMERSION course on the K»vicra 
S hrs per day with 2 meals 
ForsdnHs. 8 levohi ; Beglmrera I to Advanced U 
Next 2-4 wreak course » tarts May 2, Jtfev 30 and dhear. 

86230 YnUhnche/Uer K, Fnnec. Td- 93 01 ffl 4L Fs« 93 76 92 II 


tSsSssf-ass-' 

sSssitaasata- 


RUUKE 

- INTENSIVE FRENCH IN THE an 
SOUTH OF FRANCE FOR ADULTS since 1963 

25 h + 2 hours phonetics per week, excursions, full board 
in rooms wtth Slower end WC, park and swimming-pod. 

2 to 24 weeks, frrom Easter to Christmas. 
Information: 

I M I C F, Chateau Maflet, 34660 Coumonterrat/MontpelDer 
FAX (33) 67 85 46 91 TEL (33) 67 85 05 70 


FRENCH A MERI CAN 
STUDY CENTER 

has been specialized for 
18 Years teschtaR French to 
English speaking people the 
intensive in an all French 
speaking context. 100 host 
families or Chateau. 1 week to 
10 week long programs. Any 
age or levd.lt takes three 
weeks to go over the basics. 

Calf. 31.3122.01. , 
Write/Fax: 31/31/22/2! 

BP. 176 - 14104 Liston Codex. 



Who should attend 
The Economics Institute? 

(ndfviekjBls wishing lo male a soceosshd 
transition to U.S. graduate study through 
acadanic brining, prepenrian few GMAT, 
GRE, and TOEL and univeraly placement 
ossaanOB. 

Tho Economics Institute offers a variety of 
year-round post-graduate diploma pro- 
grams in economies, business, English, 
aunofiv? memoas. end computer scenes. 
We oho provide on ewelcnt introdudion ta 
He in Ate United States, inducting adtural, 
edw4»nol wd eanDmc issuet VVHtec 

The Economics fnsftule 
909 14& Skied, Room 16 
Boulder, CO 80302 USA. 


JAPANESE RUSSIAN 
or any of 81 Languages. 
FREE CATALOG 

lulu Uflpayt A Kawtotgr InJrtnk. Ik 
I^C Lc\nv£hiB Avgim: Suib 2V 
Net ’Uxi.NY IDI2A 

800 722 6394 

212 3431203 


Intenradonal 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 















I Q**$ I R I C rS I . I —■ nnnngr.mwNwMSHtf«w<»nBg-«w»nA«T«on»»reaH-«.«ww$»H*OTOTOgz«raro«WWWWWgW<wwaoaoro^ 




Page 8 


TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 1994 

opinion 


Heralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


^efaDitBeeTtess 
[WgiTnha ivn ■ — rf 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Good News for the Many 



Bond traders live is an upside-down world. 
When the economy goes into a recession, 
times are good for them because falling inter- 
est rates bring capital gains to people who 
speculate in bonds. But when the economy 
speeds up, rising interest rates mean losses. 
Now, after five years of recession and erratic 
recovery, the American economy seems at last 
to be expanding steadily. The result is that 
panic has been r unning through the bond mar- 
kets like drickenpox through a kindergarten. 

The latest revelation — bad news for the 
boid buyers, good news for everyone else — is 
that an unusually high number of Americans 
found jobs in March. It was, in fact, the largest 
number in one month since well before the last 
recession. Does that portend a jump in wage 
inflation, as the bond speculators darkly fear? 

Remember three dungs- First, the big in- 
crease in employment last month contains a 
large dement of bounce-back from the unusu- 
ally small increases during the abominable 
winter weather. Second, there has been no 
him so far of any acceleration in wages. Aver- 
age earnings in February were SI 1 .03 an hour, 
in March 51 1.04. Third, the unpleasant expe- 
riences of these past five years — the reces- 
sion, the downswing of many corporations, 
the decline in job security' — have done a 


preuy thorough job of breaking the easy habit 
of expecting more inflation. Companies do 
not raise prices now until they are desperate, 
and that includes the price of labor. 

When frightened investors send interest 
rates shooting upward as they did last week, 
the stock market falls — at least, it falls at 
first. But if profits continue to rise and prices 
remain stable, the financial markets will 
shortly take note and before long another 
attitude will take hold. 

Some denizens of the markets grumble sus- 
piciously that they lost a lot of money the last 
time a Democrat was president Perhaps that 
recollection is influencing them now. But the 
circumstances then were utterly different At 
this point in the Carter administration, by the 
early spring of 1978, the inflation rate was 
more than 8 percent a year and rising fast 
Currently it is —5 percent a year and a little 
lower than a year agp. 

This rapid run-up in long-term interest 
rates, if it continues, will threaten the invest- 
ment that America badly needs. But with that 
exception, despite last week's raucous vote of 
no confidence from the bond speculators, the 
prospect for solid economic growth is better 
than it has been for many years. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Bad War in Turkey 


Hardly anybody is paying attention, but a 
bad war in Turkey has turned worse. Frus- 
trated by a persistent Kurdish uprising in the 
mountainous southeast, the Turkish army is 
preparing a massive spring offensive involv- 
ing 130,000 troops. 

America is necessarily involved. Turkey is a 
NATO ally and buys American weapons that 
were certainly not meant for use against 
Kurdish villages. Yet Washington's protests 
arc muted for an ironic reason: the United 
States relies on bases in Turkey to provide 
help to Iraqi Kurds, who have carved out an 
autonomous enclave in northern Iraq. 

Farh year the war inside Turkey grows big- 
ger. In 1993, 4,000 civilians, soldiers and guer- 
rillas were killed. At least 800 villages have been 
evacuated to deny a base to the leftist Kurdish 
Workers Party, better known by its initials 
PKK. In January. 30 Turkish warplanes struck 
at a PKK camp deep within Iraq's Kurdish 
territory; the biggest such raid so far. 

Although it faces a huge budget deficit and 
roaring inflation. Turkey spent S7 billion on 
the war last year. Yet neither the government 
nor the army appears to have a political strat- 
egy for ending this conflict 

Kurds account for one-fifth of Turkey's 60 
milli on people; and their demand for cultural 
and political rights has a long history. After 
years of insisting that Kurds were only 
“mountain Turks,” Ankara explored a differ- 
ent approach under President Tuigut OzaL 
Turkish Kurds were allowed to form their 
own party, which briefly became part of the 
governing coalition formed in 1991 by Prime 
Minister Suleyman Demirel. There were 
cheers abroad when Mr. Demirel promised 
greater language rights as well as other legal 


reforms long urged by human rights advocates. 

But hope faded when Mr. Ozal died last 
April and was succeeded by Mr. Demirel. 
This shift then brought to power Tansu Ciller, 
the first woman to serve as prime minister. 
Mr. Demirel who had been twice ousted by 
the armed forces in times past, and the untest- 
ed prime minister have joined hard-liners in 
treating the Kurdish rebellion as foremost a 
military matter. To be sure, they have been 
abetted in this bv the PKK's terrorist offenses, 
including the killin g of Turks in Germany, 
where as many as 400,000 out of 1.6 million 
Turkish “guest workers” are Kurds. 

Americans learned at bitter cost in Vietnam 
that aerial attacks neither pacify nor win 
hearts and minds in hostile villages. It is hard 
to imagine any military victory in Turkey, 
given the sheer size of the Kurdish minority. 
And. dismayingly, military escalation has 
dosed down the political track to a settle- 
ment. Having banned a Kurdish-based politi- 
cal party, the government is now detaining 
five Kurdish members of the National Assem- 
bly on fishy charges of “sedition," a capital 
offense. Meantime. .Amnesty International 
has kept detailed track of “disappearances” 
— 26 in 1993 — of mainly Kurdish prisoners. 

These are alarming symptoms of a deeper 
fever. Turkish offidals fear that granting cul- 
tural autonomy to Kurds only increases the 
clamor for full independence. But that has not 
been so in Spain, where Catalan and Basque 
separatist movements have ebbed with greater 
devolution. In any case, recalling that the 
Nixon administration once cynically used 
Iraqi Kurds as pawns. Americans have special 
cause to look critically at this ominous war. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Export Controls, Continued 


American companies will now be able to 
sell almost any telecommunications equip- 
ment and computers to China and the coun- 
tries that used to be die Soviet bloc. The 
Clinton administration and Congress are be- 
ginning a sweeping revision of the system of 
export controls that the United States has 
used for a generation to keep weapons tech- 
nology out of the wrong hands. But while the 
nature of the danger has changed, export 
controls remain essential. 

At least half a dozen countries have undis- 
closed nuclear weapons or are trying to build 
or buy them. If the world gets careless and 
makes that easier, there will be more. Iraq 
came dismayingly close to building a nuclear 
bomb, with the help of equipment bought dis- 
creetly here and there around the world. Pru- 
dent governments also will want to monitor the 
means to manufacture chemical and biological 
weapons, and the missiles to deliver them. 

The Clinton administration relaxed the re- 
striction on telecommunications and comput- 
ers because it derided that they could contrib- 
ute little to weapons development, while it 
required a costly sacrifice of sales. Striking a 
sensible balance between security and commer- 
cial advantage is the hard part of this exercise. 


By coincidence, the Coordinating Commit- 
tee for Multilateral Export Controls went out 
of existence the same day that the administra- 
tion announced its new rules. COCO M’s re- 
sponsibility had been to keep leading-edge 
military technology away from the Soviets 
and Chinese. Diplomats from many countries 
are now at work to devise a successor to 
COCOM, designed to do a different job — to 
prevent any country from building illicit 
weapons. In Washington, Congress is mean- 
while beginning a fundamental rewrite of the 
Export Administration Act. 

It will no longer be good enough to rely on a 
small group of advanced industrial countries 
to carry out the controls. The key technologies 
are widely dispersed around the world. For 
example, India, with an average annual in- 
come of $330, has a sophisticated computer 
industry (not to mention nuclear capability). 
The next control regime will succeed only to 
the extent that poor countries support it and 
do not see it as an attempt to cut them off 
from technology that they need for industrial 
development. But poor countries as well as 
rich ones have a vital interest in the weapons 
that their neighbors may covertly be building. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Chinese Myopia on Korea 

As South Korean President Kim Young Sam 
was tdd in Beijing, the Chinese oppose sanc- 
tions against the North, Patriot missiles for the 
South or even a draft United Nations resolu- 
tion taking North Korea to task for interfering 
with inspections of its nuclear sites. It's bard to 
square this with assurances that China wants 
a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula. 

The threat posed by Pyongyang's blatant 
violation of the Nuclear Nonproliferation 
Treaty extends far beyond North Korea's tradi- 
tional enemies. It unsettles the foundation on 


which Asia’s stability has rested for four de- 
cades: an agreement by Japan to ngect its own 
nuclear arms in favor of an American security 
umbrella. With the American umbrella spring- 
ing leaks, any failure to persuade Pyongyang to 
drop its nudtear arms program would almost 
certainly lead to decisions by Seoul and Tokyo 
to pursue their own programs. 

China may well prefer a divided Korea to a 
united and prosperous Korea of 70 milli on 
people on its border. But the more hkdy out- 
come of its policies will be a divided Korea 
where both North and South possess the bomb. 
— Far Eastern Economic Review {Hong Kong). 


International Herald Tnbune 

ESTABLISHED 1887 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Co-Chairmen 

RICHARD Me CLEAN, Publisher A Chief Executive 
JOHN VTNOCUR. Exeative Edsor A Viet Presdati 

• WALTER WELLS. JVrxi EtSwr • SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR and 
CHARLES MjTCHELMORE, Deputy E/Oton • CARLGEWIRTZ.Aso rMtc Ei&or 

• ROBERT J. DONAHUE. Editor cf fa Editorial Pages • JONATHAN GAGE Business and Finance Editor 

• RENE BONDY. Dcf+Ity Publisher • JAMES McLEOD, Arhtrrtsirrg Ckm-tor 
•JUANITA L CASPARI, International DevAapmeru Director • ROBERTFARRE Cuxxdaarwt Direanr, Europe 

Direct eurde la PubGcuthm : Richard D. Sbtmons 


International Herald Tribune, 181 AwnueCfaarieardeGauDc. 92521 NanUy-sw-Seine. Frame. 
TeL : (1)4637.93.00. Fax :Orc, 4637-0631; Adv„ 463732. 12. Internee IHT®eurokomie 

Edsor jar Asia: Mkhad Richardson. 5 Caaetbun RL Singapore 05H. TeL {65} 472-776*1 Fax: (65} 274-2334 
Mug. Dir. Ada. RalfD. KrmpM. 50 Cbuc*Ur Rd. Hmg Kmg Td 852-9222-1188. Fax: 852-922-H Stt 
Gen. Mgr. Gqmmr: W. Lnsetbach. FriaMar. 15, rid 323 FmfytfM. TeL (069} 726755. Fax: ( 069) 72 73 10 
PrexUS: Mktud Canon: 850 Had Aw. New Yuri. NY. 1002. TeL (212} 752-3891 Far ( 212 } 755-8785 
U.K- Advertising Office: 63 Long Acn. London WC2. Tel. (071) S36A802. Far (071) 240-2254. 
SA. art capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Nanlerre B 732021126. Commission Panlture No. 61337 
© / W. hueouamd HewhJ TritvrK- Ah righa reserved ISSN: 0294-8)52. 


WHY DO 

GoFsamjBEN 


op®, ■ V 

r* Wl* VV * 



m 


W ASHINGTON — Concern about unemploy- 
ment drew the finance ministers of Europe, 
Japan and the United Slates to the recent summit 
in Detroit, but who spoke for the rest of the world? 

Unemployment rates in the industrialized coun- 
tries are at (he highest levels since the Great 
Depression — 6_5 percent in the United States and 
12 percent in Western Europe. But unemployment 
rates in much of the developing world already 
average 40 to 30 percent. 

And that does not take into account the greater 
□umber of men and women who are “underem- 

The developing countries of 
Africa, Asia and Latin America 
will account for virtually aU of die 
new entrants into the world labor 
force over the next 25 years. 

ployed,” working long hours for pennies. Without 
major new efforts by both developed and develop- 
ing countries, the problem will not be resolved. 

Burdened by debt and a rapidly expanding pop- 
ulation. economic growth in the developing coun- 
tries still remains below 1970s levels. These coun- 
tries are also adversely affected by the slow growth 
in industrial countries, which still account for 
three-fourths of the total world output. 

Work-force growth remains a key element of 
future employment patterns around the world. 
Workers in industrialized countries are aging and 


By John W. Sewell 

retiring from the ranks of the employed without an 
equal surge of new workers coming in from below. 


equal surge ot new workers coming in irom oeiow. rope or the former Soviet Union. 

The developing world has the opposite problem. In Policymakers may be tempted to ignore this 

the decades ahead, about 95 percent of the world's “other"' employment crisis. The feeling persists 


population growth will be in the developing coun- 
tries of Africa. Asia and Latin America. 

These countries will account for virtually all of 
the new entrants into the world labor force over 
the next 25 years. To meet this surge, these 
countries will* need to increase employment by 
more than 2 percent a year for the foreseeable 
future just to prevent unemployment rates from 
rising beyond today's critical level. 

The United Slates should be concerned about 
employment in the developing world for its own 
interests. Economic growth in the developing 
world means jobs in America. 

As income rises in the developing countries, so 
does the demand for American goods. Proper 
policies by the United States and the dynamic 
economies of Asia and Latin America could stim- 
ulate US. export growth by more than 10 pereem 
a year, creating as many as 1.7 million new U.S. 
jobs by the end of the decade; 

As President Bill Clinton has recognized, jobs 
bring more than just income to individuals. High 
unemployment wreaks havoc on sodetv. particu- 
larly on families. It ranks as one of the fundamen- 
tal causes of political unrest, particularly in newly 
emerging democracies, where people expea to 
reap the economic benefits of free elections. 

Jobs also help the environment, because they 
allow people to earn a living without over-cultivai- 


Now We Know That Population Control Can Work 


W ASHINGTON — When dele- 
gates gather in New York this 
week for final negotiations before 
the United Nations Conference on 
Population and Development, they 
will be armed with a pretty clear 
understanding of what works and 
what doesn't m slowing population 
growth. The knowledge has been 
gleaned from research and real expe- 
rience. It is dear and promising 
enough to disarm — at long last — 
the passionate but fruitless ideologi- 
cal debates that have sidetracked 
previous summits. 

Dozens of social and economic fac- 
tors have been studied for their con- 
nection to lowered fertility. Of them 
all, education of women nas proved 
the most consistent. 

The effect shows up with just a 
year or two or primary school, be- 
comes much larger with full primary 


By Jessica Mathews 


education and jumps again with sec- 
ondary schooling. 

What some are now- calling the 
Tamil Nadu miracle corroborates 
the research findings in an unforget- 
table way. 

In the 1 970s, the chief execu rive of 
this state in southern India launched 
a free midday meal program for chil- 
dren in primary schools. The pur- 
pose was political populism — the 
result entirely unexpected. 

The number of schools and teach- 
ers had to grow, as vehicles for deliv- 
ering the meals. 

The free meals also changed fam- 
ilies' economic calculus. A little girl 
became more valuable to the family 
by going to school and getting a 
nutritious meal (especially if she 
brought some home to share) than 


Here Comes a Forum 
For Stability in Asia 


By David C. Unger 

N EW YORK — East Asia, 
from Seoul to Singapore, is 
now the world’s axis for economic 
and trade growth. Any interrup- 
tion of that region’s growth would 
reverberate around the globe. For- 
tunately, most economic indicators 
point toward further expansion — 
provided there is continued politi- 
cal stability and peace. 

With that in mind. East Asian 
nations are preparing to launch 
this July a promising vehicle for 
avoiding military conflicts. It is 
called the ASEAN Regional Fo- 
rum, or ARF. 

It is not a military alliance like 
NATO or a collective security or- 
ganization like the Confoence on 
Security and Cooperation in Eu- 
rope: But in time it could come to 
play a central role in U.S. strategy 
for the Asia-Pacific region. 

Since the end of the Vietnam 
War, East Asia has been largely 
free of war and the destruction, 
diversion of resources and political 
turmoil that go with it Face has 
brought investor confidence, reli- 
able trade links, a stable and pro- 
ductive workforce and rising levels 
of affluence. But any relapse into 
armed conflict could abruptly turn 
economic miracle into catastrophe. 

The risk is limited but real. The 
Cold War is over everywhere else, 
but the risk of ideologically based 
fighting still haunts the Korean 
Peninsula and the Taiwan Strait 
Elsewhere, territorial disputes re- 
main dangerously unresolved, in- 
cluding c laims by six nations to the 
potentially oil- rich Spratly Islands 
is the South China sea. 

Meanwhile, mainland rhina is 
investing heavily in modernized 
military equipment that could be 
used to intervene beyond Chinese 
borders. Prominent Japanese poli- 


ticians are talking openly about 
discarding the constraints that 
have bottled up Japanese military 
power since World War II. And 
many Asians worry that an in- 
ward-looking United States may 
be psychologically disengaging it- 
self from the region’s security. 

No one is more alert to the new 
dangers than the prosperous but 
vulnerable countries of developing 
Asia. The forum began as a project 
of the Association of South East 
Asian Nations — Indonesia, Malay- 
sia, the Philippines, Singapore, 
Thailand and Brunei. Already it is 
far more than a paper organization. 

ASEAN seminars have encour- 
aged cooperative development of 
disputed areas in the Spratiys and 
promoted exchanges of military in- 
formation, along with joint train- 
ing exercises to build up confi- 
dence and damp down paranoia. 

The forum is no laager limited to 
ASEAN. It also includes, among 
others, China, Japan, Russia. 
South Korea, Vietnam and the 
United States. Conspicuously ex- 
cluded, however, are two of the 
region's most dangerous potential 
flash points, Taiwan and North 
Korea. If it is to live up to its 
ambition of preventing regional 
conflict, the forum must eventually 
embrace the entire region. ! 

For decades, security in the' 
Asia-Pacific region has been built 
around Americas Cold War treaties 
with Japan, South Korea, the Phil- 
ippines and others. Those treaties 
remain But their governing as- 
sumption was that the enemy would 
always be international commu- 
nism; they provide Bttie g ui da n ce or 
reassurance in disputes war pit one 
U.S. ally against another. The 
ASEAN Regional Forum can. That 
gives Washington a strong interest 
in encouraging its development. 

The New York Tams. 


she would be staying borne taking 
care of younger siblings. The num- 
ber of girls in school went way up. 

Tamil Nadu also had a minister 
with an obsession for family plan- 
ning. He insisted that buses and auto- 
rickshaws be covered with family 
planning slogans. Movie theaters and 
billboards carried the message. Clin- 
ics made the means available. The 
midday-meal girls began to marry in 
1985. In the next six years, the birth- 
rate, which had declined slightly in 
the previous decade, dropped by 
more than 25 percent. 

On a much grander scale, popula- 
tion trends in Bangladesh prove that 
even without female education or any 
of the other factors that economists 
and demographers have believed to 
be essential for slowing birthrates, a 
determined, sensitively designed, vol- 
untary government program can be 
astonishingly effective. 

One of the poorest countries in 
the world, Bangladesh seems to have 
every obstacle to success. It is a 
strict, patriarchal Muslim society in 
which fewer than one woman in four 
is literate and only one in 10 can go 
shopping unaccompanied. Nearly 
hall the population lives in poverty, 
and infant and child mortality is 
very high. Between 1975 and 1990, 
economic output per capita rose by 
a slow 1.6 percent annuall y. 

Every one of these characteristics 
has been called incompatible with 
fertility decline. Yet in these 15 years, 
Bangladesh's total fertility rale (the 
number of lifetime births per woman) 
dropped from seven to 4.5. 

On this unassailable evidence, the 
debate over which is more impor- 
tant, economic development or fam- 
ily planning, can finally be laid to 
rest. The slogan “Development is 
the best contraceptive” stands ex- 
posed as the mindless rallying cry of 
people whose real agenda is opposi- 
tion to family planning. 

Without doubt, economic develop- 
ment accelerates fertility decline. 
Equally obviously, rapid population 
growth can overwhelm even strong 
economic growth. Bangladesh proves 
that countries need not wait — in- 
deed, bow can they?— 1 for the magic 
of economic success before trying to 
slow the growth of their popukuions. 

Strictly voluntary programs can 
work in very poor societies, and not 
just in Asia. The 20 percent drop in 
Kenya's total fertility rate since 
1989, for example, is one of tbe 
steepest ever observed. 

Recent research provides tbe 
means to dispose of another red her- 
ring. Past abuses in family planning 
programs have made many women’s 
groups extremely leery of population 
targets. The more radical groups find 
any discuss on of fertility offensive 
on the ground that it is a form of 
blaming women. The fear that envi- 
ronmental concerns would give a 


the number of women who say they 
want to limit or space their children 
bnt do not have access to contracep- 
tives. He found 12 developing coun- 
tries that have both a national demo- 
graphic target and a recent estimate 
of unmet need. In 10 of the 12, meet- 
ing all the unmet need would actually 
exceed the national target. 

Mr. Sinding's finding means that 
there need be no conflict between 
individual rights and population 
goals. National programs can be de- 
signed and earned out in a way that 
puls individuals and families fust 

For aU these reasons, this year’s 
United Nations conference could be 
a significant event 

Two donors, the United States 
and Japan, have made notable re- 
cent commitments on funding. Ja- 
pan has pledged S3 billion through 
the end of the century for family 
planning and AIDS, a teafold in- 
crease over its previous spending. 
This indicator of a new Japanese 
engagement on global issues has re- 
ceived fax too tittle recognition. 

The only dark cloud is the Vati- 
can’s apparent intention, signaled 
when the Pope convened his rurndos 
recently, to make a major effort to 
undo the growing consensus. If he is 
successful, it could be at the cost of 
tbe most promising opportunity yet 
to build international momentum on 
an endeavor vital to human hope and 
individual f ulfillm ent. 

The writer is a senior fellow al the 
Council on Foreign Relations. She 
contributed this comment to The 
Washington Post. 


Letters intended far publication 

should be addressed “Letters to die 
Editor ■" and contain the writer's 
signature . name and full address. 
Letters should be brief and are 
subject to editing We cannot be 
responsible for the return of unso- 
licited manuscripts. 


' 

North Korea ; ^ c 
Needs Time ^ 
To Collapse * 

By Sang Oral Yang t 

S EOUL — While the root cause of 
tension on the Korean Peninsula 
is North Korea, tbe problem is being 
mishandled by the United Slates and 
some of its allies. Pyongyang's recent 
militant outburst and its threat to ! 
turn Seoul into a “sea of fire" art j 
sign s of weakness, not strength. ] 

It is worth recalling that on the eve 
of North Korea’s all-out invasion of t 
South Korea in June 1950, the regime j 
of president Kim II Sung behaved q { . 
exactly the opposite way. It made'a j . 
last minute peace overture by propds- 
tag a swap of several 1 prominent potit- : . 
ical detainees with the South, 

The key to Pyongyang's present | 
behavior lies in its inability to adjust 


Jobs: The Developing World Must Be Put to Work 


tag fragile lands or cutting down forests just to stay 
alive. And over the longer run, development of 
decent jobs will help to cut down on immigration, 
whether from the developing world. Eastern Eu- 
rope or the former Soviet Union. 


that we have enough to wony about and should 
focus on domestic problems. But ignoring devel- 
oping-worid problems will not make them go 
away, immigration, conflict and political unrest, 
as well as threats to democracy, will only in- 
crease, as will the costs of preventing spillovers 
into the industrial world. 

There are several opportunities on deck for the 
Clinton administration and other leaders to create 
strategies for global economic integration and 
growth that will benefit rich and poor countries. 
The World Population Conference meets in Cairo 
this September and will highlight the need for new 
app roadies to slowing population (and therefore 
work force) growth. Next March, world leaders 
wOJ assemble in Copenhagen for a summit on 
social development. Finally, employment through- 
out the world could be increased by the next round 
of trade liberalization negotiations. 

In an increasingly global economy, interdepen- 
dence is the key to success. The Clinton adminis- 
tration recognized this when it remained firm on 
NAFTA and GATT. It is obvious that economic 
growth in the United States and other countries 
will depend on similar, outward-looking strategies. 

The writer is president of the Overseas Develop- 
ment Council. a public policy institute. He contribut- 
ed this comment to the Los Angeles Times. 


behavior ties in its inability to adjust 
to the rapid political and economic 
changes that arc occurring in its im- 
mediate region and the wider world. 
Hie United Stales, South Korea and 
other concerned states are misread- 
tag the situation. The stick-awjkar- 
rot policy that they have adopted is 
too narrowly focused. 

Instead of looking at North Korea 
in a larger political context, they tend 
to concentrate only on the nuclear 
weapons issue and Pyongyang's re- 
fusal to comply with the safeguards, 
rules and inspections of tbe Interna- 
tional Atomic Energy Agency. 

Policymakers often see what North 
Korea should be, rather than what it 

The most appropriate . * 

policy is benign neglect. • 

is. The current regime, whether head- 
ed by Kim senior or his son, Kim Jong 
D, is incapable of the eco- 

nomic reform in Qnna. Pyongyang 

established command economy anti 
Stalinist potitieal system. ‘ 

Since China opened its economy, 
Pyongyang has also made a series of 
cosmetic adjustments to its system, 
such as liberalizing access for foreign 
investors, However, there has beep 
no serious move to decotiectivize ag- 
riculture, privatize state industries or 
allow five market forces to operated 
Stalin and Mao still live in North 
Korea. There is neither a Mikhail 
Gorbachev nor a Deng Xiaoping ip 
sight, let alone an Andre SakhWf or 
a Wei Jin gsheng. The North is stiti in 
the grip of political winter. However, 
a Pyongyang Spring will surely come. 
Tbe only question ts when and how. 

Mostlfltcly it will occur as a result { 
of implosion, explosion or a mix of 
the two. Hasty and premature appli- 
cation of the stick and carrot or 
other artificial devices is counter- 
productive; influence cannot work 
until North Korea is ready to receive j 
it The most appropriate policy is ' 
one of benign neglect. 

Such a policy would ease (he 
problem of coping with the diver- 
gent interests of Sooth Korea, the 
United States, China, Japan anil 
Russia in dealing with the North's 
nuclear ambitions. In principle, these 
concerned countries agree that i 
Pyongyang should be prevented from 
becoming a nuclear power. But each 
advocates a different approach and i 
method, and has differing priorities 
and national interests involved. 

For South Korea, adroit diploma- 
cy is essential to avoid unnecessary 
escalation of tension and come up 
with a practical and realistic resolu- 
tion of the problem. Somehow the 
South must avoid war while uot let- 
ting the North's nuclear ambitions 
go unchecked. 

Timing is critical. If, to buy time, 
Pyongyang continues to spurn de- ! 
mands from the UN Security Coun- 
cil to open its nuclear faculties (6 | 

regular inspection, the council may 
have to resort to a series of resolu- 
tions as it did after Iraq's invasion ojf 
Kuwait in 1990. The 13 Gulf War 
resolutions of the council were 
spaced out over a period of a year, 

In the case of North Korea, the 
slower the councils actions the bet- 
ter. A slow process mil avert unnefr 
cssary escalation of tension on the 
Korean Peninsula. In tbe meantime 
the Kim regime may come to an end * 
and be replaced by one that is more ” 
amenable to real reform. ' 

Preserving the integrity of the in- 
ternational treaty to prevent the 
spread of nuclear weapons, which $ 
up for extension next spring, should 
not be a constraint in this ul timate 
waiting game. 

77te writer, a professor of political 
science at Kyungjhee University in 
Seoul, is president of the Korean Asso- 
ciation of International Studies and 
author of “The North and South Kore- 
an Political Systems: A Comparative 
Analysis. He contributed this com- 
ment to die Herald Tribune. 


: fi v 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1894: Anarchists A gain? cnee, emphasizing tbe inqieratiye 

_ © flKftk nnfltwtoT an/1 a i/4 


PARIS — Many people thought the 
war of the Anarchists against society 
would flag a little after the Anarchist 
Bourdin blew himself to pieces near 
the Greenwich Observatory and after 
Pauwejs met death from his own 
bomb in the Madeleine. But another 
outrage was perpetrated in Pans last 
night [April 4] which seems to show 
that the apostles of dynamite, or 
some of them, have not changed their 
ideas of the lines on which they think 
it best to fight the people and the 
Government So close to the Palais 
du Senat as to justify the suspicion 
that the Chamber was the r eai object 
of the attack, a bomb was exploded at 
half-past eight o’clock. 


PARIS — The King of the Belgians 
theplanet can reasonably support. honored the Councff of Four vritaKs 

The demographer Steven Siuding presence and outlined completely his 
has looked dosety at the growing nation’s attitude on many of the 

body of evidence of “unmet need.* questions before the Peace Confer- 


presence and outlined completely his 
nation’s attitude ot many of the 


ence, emphasizing tbe imperative 
needs of financial and economic aid. 
The King’s handling of Belgium 4 ? 
case mane a profound i mp ress on 
upon the Big Four, and it isbdieved 
that there is little doubt that Bcf- 
gium’s immediate needs will be met 
forthwith. The afternoon session ctf 
tbe Council was held at the Ministry 
of War, where the Gzecbo-SIovak 
boundary question was taken op. T 

1944: Bucharest Is Hit ; 

NAPLES — [From our New York 
edition:] American Flying Fortresses 
and liberators bombed Bucharest 
the Rumanian capital, for the first 
tune today [April 4], flying to within 
200 miles of the Russo-German 
front to strike tbe third Allied bio? 
in twenty-four hours at Hitler's 
communications in southeastern 
Europe. The American airmen flew 
600 miles from bases in southern 
Italy to cany out tbe attack, sup; 
porting the Red Army troops inva% 
tng Rumania from the northeast. * 








'(Jr* 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 1994 


Page 9 


OPINION 


.'Nw, 

' V; ;;.“ : -’ 5 
, -- P ' r " a. - ,'^ii* 

■ • "I”,. . 

:v- ■£$ 

- -■-• 

•- : *^ v : 

■ - f?;S 

'•••;• >r -i^- 

' •-•: . , , I’d. 


uppropw' 


.Whitewater; The Real Crisis 
Is inthe Press’s Credibility 

By Anthony Lewis 

# jj 0 ^ 0 ^ — During a ion : 


local 


,n g tnp 
stung, in 


a 

kcpireai 

-..JHwsiderii Bill Oin ton's ^^wSuwSSf 
. .cnns. When people asked me to ex- 
ipto? owctly it was, I could not 
* Now, after sifting through the news I 
,.qo sec a crisis: an oncoming crisis of 
; confident in the press. Magazines, tele 
.„ws»n and newspapers have taken stories 
that deserve modest attention and blown 
..them up to hyperbolic proportions. 
Consider the story about George Ste- 


effeci that Hillary Rodham Clinton 
had invested nothing when she made 
nearly S10Q,000 in commodities trad- 
ing. The expert angrily denied saying 
any such thing, and Newsweek saidit 
regretted the mistake. 

_ How could supposedly serious tnaga- 
* “** "* ““ong? Because they, like 
i of the press, have been 


~£2ffilJS5K! > “moon disclosed iti AndC 

was profoundly important: the grossest 
abuse of the UJS. Constitution in mod- 


ramie the Resolution Trust Corporation 
. had appointed a highly partisan Repub- 
. ,Tican lawyer to look into a matter possi- 
bly connected to Whitewater. HjTwas 
, jold that the RTC was an independent 
.pgency, and he went away. 

■Time magazine suggested darkly that 
. Mr- Stepbanopoulos might be charged 
jyith obstruction of justice. Sure: Ex- 
* P r ^ n ? partisan outrage is a crime. 

_ k Times writers and editors and all the 
‘others who ludicrously overplayed that 
to school to! 


ones go so wror 
much of the rest < 
consumed by competitive zeal to get out 
front on the Whitewater story. 

With that zeal, compare the press's 
slumbering performance in the Iran- 

admin - 
ran-contra 


•tale should be sent back to school to learn 

"■some American history. For partisan 
.has been going on in government one? 

^thedays of George Washington. counsel to the president, who mistakenly 

un l une s cover was a photograph of thought it was wise to use the tactics 

r Hininn an A Mr C, i _r _ • • 


ern times. A president, or men acting in 
his name, claimed a right to do what 
they wished abroad and hang the law. 

Whitewater at worst involves petty 
financial juggling and favors years be- 
fore Bill Groton became president. 
There is no constitutional issue, no great 
question of the separation of powers. 

Why, then, has the press bran so rav- 
enous over Whitewater? One reason is 
evidently that the Clinton While House 
at first stonewalled and deceived. Per- 
haps it was Bernard Nussbaum, then 


KBfeass 



A Reinvention of History 
To Suit Their Self-Esteem 

By Jonathan YarcQey 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


it. — ayn ui muuKni u was wise 10 

.Mr. Uinton and Mr. Stephanqpoulos of private litigation, 
loofang hamed as if by this latest Vincent Foster’s suici 
Tevsiation. Only tbe picture was cropped 
and old, taken in a different context. 

Newsweek’ s contribution last week 
^Was a story quoting an expert to the 


' - m:.- 

"-si: 




= — rrr > 

1 - v 


s r ; , 


■t4 


•i ,.ry* 1 

• t ;• r- ' slr 


■Z I 

'.’i 


Behind Whitewater 

S OME THINGS about Washington 
are constant. Among them: 

. • The political attention paid to 
'White House scandal, real or concocted, 
% inversely proportional to the power 
and prospects of the opposition party. 
’*• Republicans in Congress were bemg 
pushed around by a cocky Democratic 
-president. You don't need a doctorate in 
political science to see that Senator Phil 
.Gramm and Representative Newt Ging- 
■Hch would rather talk about Whitewater 
than about the economy or Tokyo. 

" • If a president has not made appoint- 
Mnentsbyhis Inaugural, he has to delegate 
'that authority. Something like a third of 
’midlevd appointive posticus in many 
cabinet departments are still filled by 
J Republicans. I would bet one or more of 
■thwn have been feeding Whitewater in- 
formation to Republican senators. 

11 •The Washington press is predatory. 
Many Americans still believe Watergate 
-was a power struggle between reporters 
and Republicans. Perhaps Whitewater 
tyQl persuade them that the press, still 
J living on bones and gristle thrown from 
'the White House at the end of each day, 
will go after any red meat it sniffs. 

— The columnist Richard Reeves. 


suicide, and the se- 
cret removal of files from his White 
House office, naturally aroused suspi- 
cions. Suspicion has been carried to 
the point of suggestions that Mr. Foster 
was really murdered. 

A major factor in pushing the 
Whitewater story has been Jim Leach, 
the Iowa Republican congressman. He 
is usually so thoughtful and decent a 
politician that it is hard to understand 
how he got so carried awav. producing 
supposed “evidence" that has no proof 


’evidence" that 

no connection to the Clintons. Mr. 
Leach appears to be a little uneasy him- 
self now with what he has wrought. 

Finally, the press has been excited 
because Mr. and Mrs. Clinton turned 
out to be something other than holy 
creatures devoted to good government 
and children- They wanted to make 
some money, too. 

That is a subject of some human inter- 
est, worth examining. But a sense of pro- 
portion would be helpful. Those who 
make it to the presidency usually bad 
some rich and influential friends along 
the way. Ronald Reagan had lots more 
than BiH Gin ton. But the press was most- 
ly afraid to tangle with Mr. Reagan. 

A sense of proportion is what has been 
lacking in much of the Whitewater cover- 
age, along with a sense of history. 1 think 
the press wiU regret its hysteria. 

At the recentpress conference a report- 
er asked Mr. Qinton if he had learned 
any Lesson from Whitewater. The ques- 
tion might as faMy be potto the press. 

The New York Times . 


Turkish Survival 

Regarding the editorial “ Turks. Kurds 
and Allies” (March 28): 

Hus Washington Post editorial shows 
an effort to be balanced and objective. 
Bui it falls short or understanding the 
Turkish side of this complex problem, 
which involves the very survival of the 
unitary Turkish state: 

Results of the recent general election 
show that the Turkish people support 
Prime Minister Tansu Ciller's dynamic 
measures agaiast terrorism and seces- 
sion, despite her rather lackluster per- 
formance in economic management. 

Gtizens of Kurdish origin nave risen to 
the highest positions in the Turkish state 
and society. But this does not satisfy the 
secessionist^ whose ultimate aim is to 
establish a separate Kurdistan. No demo- 
cratic stale can tolerate secessiomsm. 

Turkey has proven that it is a part of 
the Western world in many ways. But if 
the price of bring Western is to accept a 
“social solution” that inevitably would 
lead to a Bosnia-like fragmentation, we 
are not ready to pay this price. 

The recent elections have indicated 
the determination of the Turkish people. 

ALTEMUR KIL1G 
Istanbul 

Apples and Oranges 

Regarding “Sound Familiar?" (Letters, 
March 23) from Alena Hochmann: 

Ms. Hochmann misses the point in 
comparing Jewish settlements in the 
West Bank and Gaza with the presence 
of Palestinians living in Israel. 

International law forbids the settle- 
ment of occupied territory by the occu- 


piers. Thus, the Israeli settlements are 
not only illegal but have become a seri- 
ous obstacle in the search for peace. 

In the 1948-49 Arab-lsradi War, Isra- 
el was “ethnically cleansed” of more 
than 700,000 Palestinians. Those who 
managed to escape expulsion, and their 
descendants, account for the present 
Palestinian population in Israel itself. 

GUNVANT GOVINDJEE. 

Cardiff, Wales. 

Macedonia and Cuba 

Regarding “Help Macedonia and Pres- 
sure Greece if Necessary” (Opinion, 
March 18) by George Soros: 

Greece is accused of unreasonably 
imposing an embargo on a small coun- 
try. I wonder whether President John F. 
Kamedy[$ blockade of Cuba in 1962 
was considered unreasonable? 

CHRISTOS G. ACHIS. 

Athens. 

Schindler Uncensored 

Regarding “ ‘Schindler': A Hit World- 
wide " (Features, March 23): 

In an article describing the interna- 
tional reception of the movie 
“Schindler’s List,” you state, “The Phil- 
ippine censor attempted to ban the film 
because of a scene showing nudity 

What actually happened was this: 
The Philippine Board of Censors derid- 
ed to riimmale two brief scenes which 
it regarded as offensive. Once those 
scenes were eliminated, the film was 
released for showing. 

When Steven Spielberg was apprised 
of this, he derided to withdraw the film 
rather than accept the censors’ derision. 


At this point. President Fidel Ramos 
stepped in and ordered the film released 
with none of its scenes eliminated. 

Whatever one may think of the wis- 
dom, or lack thereof, of the Philippine 
Board of Censors* derision, there was no 
desire to ban the film. It is now showing 
to record-breaking crowds in the na- 
tion’s (healers. 

BARTHOLOMEW LAH1FF. 

Manila. 

The Courteous Computer 

Regarding “ Who Say's Pm Welcome ? 
Just Give Me the Number " ( Meanwhile, 
March 31) by Richard Cohen: 

The writer complains that when he 
dials information, the phone number he 
wants is given to him a few seconds late 
because Bell Atlantic's computerized 
voice is busy being courteous. 

Mr. Cohen should try working in a 
country where the phone company, like 
most other businesses, never bothers to 
say “Have a nice day” or even “May I 
help you?” Here in France, dial directo- 
ry information and you will likely have 
to hold for four to five minutes before 
anybody even answers. Half the time, of 
course, you don’t even get an answer — 
only the recording which says that the 
lines are saturated, so please call later. 

Disregard for the customer is a way of 
life in the French business world. While 
many say that services are the business 
of the future, France is beaded for eco- 
nomic disaster unless the general atti- 
tude changes soon. 

F. DUNOYER de SEGONZAC. 

Cannes. 


W/ASHINGTON — By and large wc 
YY Americans don’t know history be- 
cause we are indifferent to it, except on 
those rare occasions when it bumps up 

agains t our real or fancied self-interest. 
Wc are an impatient people, ever on the 
gg, so the notion of taking the time to 
devote careful study to the past has 
never sat well with us. We tend to agree 
with Henry Ford that history is bunk 
and, being ignorant of history, we tend 

MEANWHILE 

to misquote him, since what he actually 
said was, “History is more or less b unk . 

Wealso don’t know history because we 
have been poorly taught The school- 
rooms of America, have had many dedi- 
cated, inspired teachers, but they have 
also had many who have been more deep- 
ly steeped in the lunatic arcana of educa- 
tionist methodology than in the subject 
matter they allegedly teach. The old ad- 
age about staying me chapter ahead of 
one's students is too often true when a 
teacher struggles to master subjects in 
which he or she was never suffirionly 
educated while studying “education.” 

This problem is compounded when 
the textbooks around which courses are 
shaped are themselves, for whatever rea- 
son, inadequate. It is this aspect of the 
teaching and study of history that is 
addressed in “History Textbooks: A 
Standard and Guide," a slender book 
released last week by the American 
Textbook Council, an independent 
monitoring group based in New York. 

As its tide and subtitle suggest, the 
publication is intended, narrowly, as “a 
tool to assist textbook reviewers in the 
selection of textbooks, free of publish- 
ers’ sales pressure” Persons engaged in 
such business will find much of use in its 
discussion of such matters as the decline 
of historical narrative and the rise — 
surprise! — of pictures and graphics. 
But the boric also has a larger purpose, 
which is to call public attention to the 
appalling degree to which history text- 
books have become instruments of so- 
cial and psychological engineering. 

The publication of history textbooks 
is a big business dominated by a handful 
of firms and shaped in great measure by 
two groups: the anonymous drones who 
plug away at revisions of the standard 
texts, and the state review boards that 
prescribe the essential nature of those 
texts. Then review boards can erase 
under intense pressure from within and 
without, because history ran be a touchy 
subject, never more so than in the 
touchy climate in whidi we live today. 
The council reports: 

“American history textbooks raise 
unique content problems, since they are 
official portraits of our country’s past, 
purchased by governments and assigned 
to the students who will one day partici- 
pate in government by consent To what 


degree textbooks affect bow students see 
themselves, their nation and the world 
cannot be easily reckoned, but their sub-' 
lexis, interpretations, biases ami omis- 
sions do provide dues to bow we regard 
ourselves as Americans — and how pub- 
lishers seB textbooks. Their central place 
in the curriculum makes them especially 
interesting to philosophers, journalists 
and intellectuals — as well as ideologues 
of many groups and causes." 

Though one should never underesti- 
mate the mischief that can be perpetrated 
by philosophers, journalists and intellec- 
tuals, it is safe to say that the culprits in 
the rewriting of the canon of American 
histofy are agents of multiculturalisa in 

chologjcal befieve that the pv 

duty of education is to enhance 
f -esteem. " and book publishers who 
“avoid a candid appraisal of historical 
co n troversies, especially if those contro- 
versies reflect current political struggles 
and could hurt textbook sales.” 

The consequences; of the pressures 
brought to bear by these interests are 
assorted and almost uniformly anfomi- 
nate, if not actually malign. Thiougi pres- 
sure groups often talk in terms of correct- 
mstoricai record or altering the 
ltric” biases of the past, they are 
primarily interested in replacing rid er- 
rors with new ones. “The historian works 
on evidence.” as the late AmaJdo Montig- 
bano pat iL “Rhetoric is not his busi- 
ness." But rhetoric is precisely the busi- 
ness of those who want history texts to 
reflect their own racial ethnic, political 
ideological or sexual viewpoints. 

American history as interpreted by 
man y of these groups becomes, in the i 
words of C. Vann Woodward, “primari- 
ly a history of oppression, and the focus E 
is on the oppressed.” A high school ? 
textbook called “American Voices” tells 
its readers that “nativism and racism” : 

are among the chief characteristics of 
the American character. : 

As the council notes: > 

“This is bad history of a new (and < 
demoralizing) sort For all thosewho seek 
to reinvent histoty on behalf of self-es- 
teem, when it is in fashion among intel- 
lectuals to claim that all reality and hence , 
all morality is relative, when television 
specializes incnaapgty in ‘re-creations’ 1 

and ‘dramatizations,' it is becoming in- 
creasingly difficult, nri merely for young 
de, to distinguish between fact ana 
between reality and fantasy 
One needn't agree with the council in 
all particulars — the “festive patrio- 
tism” it so fondly recalls in past texts 
produced its own share of bad nistoiy — 
to know that in essence it is right. The 
writing of the history taught in Ameri- 
can schools is now in the hands of peo- 

E le whose political or financial interest 
esin fictionalizing history, in making it 
not history at all but propaganda. 

The Washington Post. 


BOOKS 


THE SILENT WOMAN: 
-Sylvia Plath and Ted 
Jffnghes 

By Janet Malcolm. 208 pages. 
to. Knopf. 

'Reviewed by 
iMarie Arana-Ward 

T HE biographer, writes Janet 
Malcolm in this extraordinary 
'investigation into poet Sylvia 
Plaih's labyrinthine afterlife in oth- 
■er people’s bools, “is like the pro- 
Tesaonal burglar, breaking into a 
house, rifling through certain draw- 
'ers that he has good reason to t hink 
contain rhe jewelry and money, and 
triumphantly bearing the loot 
'away. What is so remarkable 
about that declaration is what it 
'says about Malcolm herself — bc- 
fceath its toot of self-righteousness 
is an unmistakable lament of self- 
loathing. For although “The Silent 
Woman” is a brilliant postmortem 
on the literature about Plath — a 
work about the peeping toms and 
‘busy bodies who built careers on 
her sad life — it is also an admis- 
sion that there is thievery in Mal- 
colm’s own venture. 

ft v Sylvia Plath and the British poet 

Ted Hughes had beat married for 
six years when they decided to sep- 
arate in the fall of 1962. Thtae was 
another woman in Hughes s life. 
Although Plath was sick with rage, 
the next six months were the most 
productive in her life. Feverishly. 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Dame Beryl Grey, the British 
prima ballerina, has just read 
“Come Dance With Me: A Memoir 
1898-1 95(Tby Ninette de Valois. 

“I was preparing a lecture for the 
Royal Society of Arts, and wanted 
to check some facts, and 1 became 
so absorbed in it that 1 just read it 
through." 

( Barry James, IHT) 



she wrote the haimting “Arid” po- 
ems; her entire reputation as a poet 
is based on than. One night in 
February 1963, however, the 30- 
year-old Hath closed her sleeping 
children’s bedroom door, set out 
their breakfasts, went into the 
kitchen, knelt down and stuck her 
head into the hiss of a gas oven. 
That final act thrust her into celeb- 
rity and Hughes onto a treadmill he 
has yet to dismount 
In this sinuous cofl of interview 
and essay (published in slightly dif- 
ferent form in The New Yorker last 
year), Malcolm spins the story of 
the people Plath left behind: Ted 
Hughes, who sold Plaih’s memoir 
of madness, “The Bell Jar," after 
her death in order to buy himself a 
house on the north coast of Devon; 
Olwyn Hughes, his sister and 
spokeswoman, who doggedly de- 
fends Hughes; Plath’s mother, 


Aurelia, who, in despair over the 
negative way she was portrayed in 
“The Bell Jar,” published her 
daughter's most intimate letters be- 
cause they cast Mrs. Plath in a 
more favorable light. 

And then then: are the biogra- 
phers: Anne Stevenson (“Bmer 
Fame”); Edward Butscher (“Sylvia 
Plath: Method and Madness”); 
Linda Wagner-Martin (“Sylvia 
Plath: A Biography”) Ronald Hay- 
man (“The Death and Life of Syl- 
via Rath”), and Paul Alexander 
.(“Rough Magic: A Biography of 
Sylvia PlatiO. Malcolm dissects 
the books, letting us eavesdrop on 
her visits and exchanges with the 
various authors, making us wit- 
nesses to the nasty bits they spew 
about one another. 

Malcolm is quick to declare her 
loyalties. Although Stevenson’s 
book was highly criticized for hs 



^ By Robert Byrne 

* TADIM SVJAGINSEV r&keda 

-V speculative pawnsacnfice 

against Jon Aroason m . Roimd 3 of 
SeRjsykjavik International Tour- 
& February A to* JJg 
aea Gary Kasparov brought baa 

flexible development with 4 

-Bbd to been *f?jS ™j! 
ia718 Bg6 Kd7 19 f3 jO lfe 

OS 21 o4Nc5- 5^,^ 

Bc3 10 be Qc8, ^ W3S evid® 1 *.* 1 
re* att f ck urtie skirmishing 


KmKBOH/BLMX 




cause 12 dc j Araason 
forces majc- Af^ 1 , ^ N b d5 M 

could m ® ke PiSrfKc7l2toi*ai- 
jjnjng town the wp*™ ’ 


d c & • i a a 

2VJAGWSGV/WWTE 

Position after: 25 .» Nh5 

and 16_aL Syjaginsev responded 
with the pawn sacrifice 15 d5!?, 
forcing Blade lo expose his king 
fuither if be wanted to take it 
After 15-.ed 16 cd Bd3, S“~ 
sev could have taka a fat 
and easier coarse with the 
recapture 17 Nd3, since 17—1 
drops the knight to 18 Qe4. In- 
stead, he gave up a pawn with 17 
d6!7 to lore the Wade king forward 
with 17— Kd6 18 Rdi Ke7 19 Rd3. 
Then, after 19— d5 20 CM), White 
would have had good attacking 
chances with threats of 21 Rfdl 
and 22 c4 or 21 f4 to break open 
lines against the enemy king. 


Aroason chose I7—Ke6 18 Nd3 


Qc6, hoping to obtain an end game 
favorable to blade because of the 
too far advanced d6 pawn. But 
Syjaginsev was only too happy to 
sacrifice again with 19 Qc2!? 

The Icelander interpolated 
19._c4 20 Nb4 before capturing the 
pawn with 20._Qg2. Still after 21 
0-0-0 Qc4 22 Qe2, it remained 
difficult to get the blade king bad 
under the cover of its own pawns. 

Svjaginsev drove forward with 
23 f3, 24 e4 and 25 e5 and, on 
25_J^h5, broke open the black king 
ation with 26 f4! There was no 
fense. After 26-NS3 27 he, such 
an attempt as 27.. would have 
been crushed by 28 ef Kf6 29 Qe7 
KgS 30 Rd5 Rc5 31 f5mate. Ama- 
son gave up. 


open expressi on of sympathy for 
Ted and Olwyn Hughes, Malcolm 
calls it “the most intelligent and the 
only aesthetically satisfying of the 
five biographies.” But Stevenson 
made the mistake of conceding that 
her ruthless portrait of Plath was 
based on material provided by Ted 
and Olwyn Hughes. “Tbc biogra- 
phy-loving public does not want to 
near that biography is a flawed 
genre," Malcolm writes — that a 
Rashomon-like skewing of the sto- 
ry is inevitable. “It prefers to be- 
lieve that certain biographers are 
bad guys.” 

Which brings us to the particu- 
lars of Malcolm's own notoriety 
and the reason that “The Silent 
Woman” has all the frisson of a 
naughty confession. In 1982, Mal- 
colm published a stinging profile of 
the psychoanalyst author Jeffrey 
Masson, whom she bad befriended 
in the process of studying his went. 
Masson sued her, clanmug that her 
portrait of bum was distorted, mah- 
dous and libelous. In 1990, even as 
the suit was being played out in the 
courts (the trial wfl} resume next 
month). The New Yorker pub- 
lished the germ of another book, 
“The Journalist and the Murder- 
er.” In it, Malcolm described the 
journalist Joe McGinniss as a liar 
who lured Jeffrey MacDonald — 
the Green Beret charged with the 
1970 murder of his pregnant wife 
and two daughters — into partner- 
ship only to betray him on the 
pages of “Fatal Vision.” “Every 
journalist who is not too stupid or 
too full of himself to notice what is 
going on knows that what he does 
is morally indefensible,” she wrote 
with typical asperity, although the 
accusation sounded eerfly like what 
she had done to Masson. By now 
Malcolm’s career evinces an unmis- 
takable pattern of obsession: on 
one ride, the cunning ferocity of the 
reporter, on the other, the ultimate 
elusiveness of truth. 

And so it is with Sylvia Plath. 
who, for all of Maloolm’s virtuosity, 
bovers beyond this book, wraithlike, 
evanescent, unattainable. Her ab- 
sence is, of coarse, the whole point. 
What fascinates Malcolm — and in 
turn captivates us —is the ravenous 
pack circling the gbost 

But even as Malcolm leads us 
past the wolves, we cannot hdp 
notice that she is baying at the 
moon. 

Marie Arana-Ward is on the staff 
of The Washington Post. 



MM 

ZVm 
1 44 
204 
3Ne3 

4 NO 

5 Bg3 
6BM 
?e3 
8 MS 
S Q»4 

» be 
U NeS 


NnmKNDlAN DEFENSE 
Steel 


Nf6 

*6 

BM 

M 

M 

NcB 

Baft 

NaS 

Sc3 


White 
trtev 
jaas ed 

16 ed Bd3 

17 46 Krf 

UNjO O'* 
19 Oe2 c4 

3D NW Mi 

210*0 tefi 

Site* w 1 


U*t 

25 aS 

26 (4 

27* 


W 


To our roodfirs in France 


U's never 1 

and save wA our navi 

tolfrag service. 

Just cal us today c* 
05437437. 


NEWS EVENTS WHICH COULD AFFECT 
YOUR UFE: 



FOLLOW THE WORLD EVERY DAY IN THE IHT 


, •:» sm . & **rsc*.w 

CALL US TOLL-FREE 

AUSTRIA: 06608155 LUXEMBOURG 08002703 
BELGIUM: 0 800 1 7538 SWITZERLAND: 1555757 
FRANCE: 05437 437 THE NETHERLANDS: 060225158 
GERMANY: 0130 848585 UNITH) KW3DOM: 0800 89 5965 

Or sene/ in the coupon below. 


Subseripbenftoasjl Sjvings off IHT cover Pncea 


Couiuy/CuiTvncy 


12 months 
+ 2 months 
FREE 


6 momma 

+ 1 month 
FREE 

3 months 
+ 13 FREE 
Issues 

Austria 

A. Sen. 

feOOO 

<• 

3J3M 

1.0(H) 

Belgium 

B.Fr. 

14400 


7,700 

4.2M 

Denmark 

DXr. 

3,400 

"'‘H -te; •• 

1^00 

1.050 

FMvk) 

FJL 

2.400 

, '"-I 

1J00 

700 

France 

FJF. 

1J950 


1.070 

580 

Garmanv* 

DJML 

700 

'-•"a* 

38S 

210 

Greet Britain 

£ 

210 

Fi-.» W; 

115 

» 

Greece 

□r. 

75,000 


41^00 

22A0O 

Want 

£lil 

230 


125 

88 

tab 

Ue 

500J00 


27fe000 

isojno 

Luxgnriiauu 

LFr. 

14,000 


7.700 

4JOO 

Nafcerianda 

R 

770 


420 

230 

Norway 

N.Kr 

3JS00 


1J00 

1.050 

Poftigal . 

Esc- 

47.000 


atom 

1AOOO 

Spain 

Pan. 

48.000 


26,500 

1A500 

-hand defer. Uadnd 

Pta s. 

55,000 


27^00 

14,500 

Sweden (atonal) 

SKr. 

3.100 


1.700 

m ~ma 

-landddhreiv 

SKr. 

&500 


1J00 

1 ,000 

Sntozartand 

, S-fL 

BIO 


335 

IBS 

RMofEurcoemCQI 

s 

486 


285 

145 

CELN.AWca.kanw 

French Alricaft Widda East 

5 

630 

'** : ' - • ; \S 

345 

180 

Guf States, Am, Central and 
South America 

S 

780 


430 

235 

Rut ot Africa 

£ 

800 


485 

270 


* Por toomtiMVcancenm tamNMjwy* major German cities cal tefi free IHT 
Gonranv Bt 013M4 85 85 or tax (069) 175 413. Under Barman tegulafians. a 2 -week 
tree period la granted lor al now orders. 


Yes, I wait to start receiving the fHT. This is fa subscription term I prefer 
(chock appropriate boxes): 

0 12 months (364 issues in all with 52 bonus issues). 

0 6 months (182 issues rn afi widi 26 bonus issues). 

0 3 months (91 issues in afl with 13 bonus issues). 

0 My check is endosed (payable to fa International Herald Tribune]. 

0 Please charge my: □ American Express □ Diners dub □ VBA 
□ MasterCard □ Eurocard □ Access 

Craft card charges wS be mode in French Francs at current exchange rates. 

cardmkt.no. 


.&SNA7UE- 


EXP. DATE . 

FOB BUSNESS C*D«$, PlEASE NXCATE VOUR V^T NUMBS: 


(HTVATnunher FR74732D21 1261) 
□ Vr.D Ate D MbMMLY NAME. 


FRSTNAME, 


PKMANENT ADDRESS: a HOMED BUSNESS. 


aiY/eooE. 


COUNTOL 


TEL 


-FAX- 


3 tcraU>S®nbune 

rUBLMtGP WITH -mr 1WW YORK TIMES MO THE WASKMinXH rOST 


^?5 lw 2pi||i^^a»p™to:Subsa4itoMmnB»,^^^ 5 

WT, 181 Avenue 92521 t&jk ScFtyw*. Z 

toC 33.146 37 C6 51 -fafc 33.1^6^104?^ « 

Tfce e/fare otoilabb fa mwsijh{EribsBQn(y. U 


X- 

3’5 

dy 

Bh 

ly, 

u- 

■er 

al 

ks 

'«■ 

JL 

\y 

ti- 

UL 

of 

or 
• ial 
ue 
es 
!5. 
o- 


r 
t 
i 

t 
r 

i 
r 
c 

< 
i 
i 


IB 


al 

of 

tie 

or 

nt 

Ml 

(is 

d, 

al 

H 

Tt 

m 

b- 

ac 

ut 

ri- 

al 

ti, 

o- 

W 


s- 

a- 

v, 

it 

>s 

io 

e, 

te 

e. 

t- 

te 

i- 

tt 

£ 

b 

1- 


Subscribe now 

JOh offlbe ; | 

and save up to jt m 

/ v cover price 


I 





I 2**2 I K I C kS I. . | *xoao©oo©ee»oooi 1 wrainreM«m«nnnn5r™NiwSHMW0nmfH*ww«nmJ«™0n«mJS»romw-NriWOra««zra 


International Herald Tribune 
j Tuesday April 5, 1994 


a 


Go 

F 


Page 10 




SPRING SUMMER 
COLLECTION 


ESGMK 


In 

Paris 


Marie-Maitine 


Clockwise from top right: Angus 
Cundey, managing director of Henry 
Poole ; Alan Alexander, senior ciater 
with military uniforms; French Prime 
Minister Edouard Balladur. ; John 
0*Brien, cutter; Keith Levett, trainee cutter 
working on pinstriped fabric. 


8, rue de Sevres, 

Part* 6th 




Apaa Fnqcr-Pitsa 


The Cutting Edge of Tradition 


By Suzy Menkes 

IiaaTumonat Herald Tribane 


L ONDON — The cartoon shows 
Prime Ministers John Major and 
Edouard Bafladur enjoying an en- 
tente cordials 

“Your taflor is rich.” sots Major, using the 
first English phrase that French kids learn In 
school. 

*My tailor is English!” replies a check-suited 


Prince of Wales, made flamboyant mixes of 
tweed checks his personal signature and '‘Old 
Pooley's" premises into a gentlemens dub a 
century ago. 

Now British cheats are just 30 percent. 
Americans 40 percent, 20 percent are from 
Continental Europe and 10 percent are from 
the rest of the world. 

What do the modem clients lode for — and 
especially the persnickety French who will 
come next week at the rate of 20 a day? 


after 10 yean and “quibble” if alterations an! 
charged. Vet he finds clients in general easier to 


The piquant picture hangs in London's Sa- 
vfle Row at Henry Poole & Co. — a testament 
to the fact that the tailoring firm, established in 
1806 mid carrying warrants from Queen Eliza- 
beth and Emperor Napoleon HE, is indeed 
taflor to the French prune minister. 

Next week, Henry Poole’s managing direc- 
tor, Angus Cundey, and his senior cutter, Alan 
Alexander, will install chalk and scissors at a 
discreet hold near the Madeleine in Paris and 
receive die c r e am of its 330 French diems. 
Whether BaHadur will take time out from mili- 
tant students and angry D-Day vets to be fitted 
for a new suit is, of course, a matter between 
gentlemen. 

“I don’t normally mention hying customers," 
says Cundey, who has the upright bearing and 
discreet manner of a central-casting butler. 

Being a bespoke taflor in the modem world is 
not the anachronism h seems. The SavSe Row- 
premises may be fusty with tradition — all 
mahogany cabinets, stiff militaiy uniforms, cer- 
emonial swords and Imperial eagle perched 
overhead — a reminderof he days when Napo- 
leon m made his way from the Berry Brothers 
wine store to Poole the taflor. 

But even the most traditional vlrilk are s till 
living. Keith Levett, a young trainee cotter, is 
working on gold-thread appliqu6 for a Foot- 
man’s Full Stare Coatee at Buckingham Palace. 
Alexander is slicing fine Scottish tweed des- 
tined for a Japanese golf course. 

Upstairs inhis office, Cundey is fieldingcalls 
from former U. S. Ambassador Charles Price, 
fixing the June trip to the United States to 
service the 2,000 American clients and arrang- 
ing the transportation of Sr Winston fhmrhin 
(in waxwork form) to Tokyo. Henty Poole will 
celebrate 30 years collaboration with the Mai- 
suzakaya firm in Japan with a traveling exhibi- 
tion in Tokyo from September. 

Cundey and his son Simon, 24, malrg up die 
fourth and fifth generations of a family buti- 
that flourished when Edward VTL 


“Everyone comes to us for the typical Eng- 
' at foe French 


lish look.” says Cundey. adding that i 


What do modem clients 
look for — especially the 
persnickety French? 


“more than any other race” appreciate 
quality Super Hundred wools and cas. 


: the top 
cashmeres 

and “don’t ask how long it will wear or how 
much it costs." 

“Usually we axe accused of bong old-fash- 
ioned and fuddy-duddy — but 90 percent of 
customers come for a traditional English suit,” 
he says. “Three of our cutters are under 45 and 
they could do much more innovations. All the 
time we are aware of fashion.” 

That does not include following the off-the- 
peg fashion leaders and making unstructured 
suits with all the stuffing knocked out of than. 

“We expect a suit to last — to look elegant 
after a long time,” says Cundey. “However 
comfortable unstructured suits are, they get 
s c ruffy ." 

The quiet revolution Cundey has seen since 
be joined the firm in 1957 is in die lightness of 
fabrics as the weight of the doth has halved, 
demanding ever more subtle technique. 

“You can argue that we have greater crafts- 
man now than before World War Q,” he says. 
“With an eight-ounce cloth you have to be more 
meticulous with the pitting, you can't start 
mani p ulating with an iron.” 

In the workrooms, the staff is turning out 
here a short coat destined for a very British race 
meeting: there a super-soft cashmere sports 

i 'acket to grace a trans-Atlantic country dub; 
lere a cape for the palace staff. 

Cundey has vivid memories of his first 


deal with in an egalitarian age than when he# 
watched his father cope with the “arrogant, 
autocratic” aristocrats, one of whom rode his 
horse down (he corridor to complain about the 
cut of his riding breeches. Then cheats would,' 
“stand on the steps and yell out ‘Cundey* and 
be had to crane running.” Now Poole’s has to; 
avoid matey clients suggesting that they should 
be on first-name terms. 

“That really grates with me. 1 like ‘Mr. So-; 
andrSo’ or “Sir,* " he says. “ Y ou have to confine 
the relationship.” 

“Difficult” clients in the past included Gen-; 
era! de Gaulle, whose name appears in Hemy 
Poole ledgers from the time that he was living in 
London. Churchill “had no conscience about 
keeping the tradesmen waiting” and would 
leave the cutters hanging about while he was in 
the garden. The years of ledgers, filling in cheat 
orders in crabby writing and sometimes indeci- 
pherable code, could tdl a tale or two — like; 
who paid for the shapdy suits ordered by Lillie 
Langtry, mistress of Edward VH. 

But the ledgers also prove something that 
surprises in a credit-card age: Current diems 
are better payers than when Queen Victoria 
“took two yeairs to settle a bilL” 

“The new generation of clients are much 
easier to deal with and young people pay us; 
quicker saying, *We want you to survive,* ” says 
Cundey. ‘Tutting aside the recent recession,' 
customers pay much quicker today. And they, 
are a new type of customer. It’s not the old 
aristocracy. It is rather the enterprising busi- 
nessmen, insurance brokers, doctors, industri-i 
alists. They run their own businesses and their 
>athies are with the little taflor. Our bad 
are less than most retail shops.” 


attempt at making a suit when he inadvertently 
cut off the cuffs on thejiams and effectively 


ness 


as 


the cuffs on the 
ruined an entire bale of i 
Cundey bemoans the clients who come back 


F OR all its international renown, Hen- 
ry Poole is a small business with an- 
nual sales of around £2 milli on (Si 
millio n) While the ready-to-wear 
ants have licensed their names across the 
Poole's tailoring is the core business, al: 
Cundey’s father introduced neckties and the 
Japanese arrangement is financially lucrative; 
Cundey says that he would Hke mare diversifi 
cation. 

So is Prime Minis ter Bahadur’s tailor rich? 
The answer is worthy of a gentleman. 

“I have job satisfaction,” says Cundey. “We 
don’t pay ourselves very much. But we are very! 
privileged to be able to meet charming , dever 
people we all respect” 


Under the Arcades of Palais Royal 


By Roni Amelan 


P ARIS — Waistcoats almost identical to 
those worn by the agitating aristocrats 
who clamored for political rights far 
the third estate doing the final days of 
the anrien regime are back in style under the 
fake-classical arcades of the Palais Royal an 
increasingly luxurious haven of tranquillity, de- 
spite its turbulent history, in the heart of Paris. 

The waistcoats are for sale at L’Escalier (Tar- 
gent, in what may be tamed Europe's oldest 
shopping maR in the Galerie de Montpensier. 
Opened by Danou Jacquard more than a year 
ago, it reflects its owner’s passion for the 17th 
and 18th centuries, through her selection of fur- 
niture and silver and the waistcoats she makes 
herself with reproduction antique fabrics. 

Jacquard, the dapper descendant of a family 
of Lyon silk weavers that gave birth to the 
inventor of the so-called Jacquard loom, takes 
her origins seriously. She is eager to explain the 
technical and artistic background of tbe ex- 
traordinarily refined reproductions of I7tb- 
and 1 8 ib-centnry fabrics she commissions from 
artisan weavers. 

Jacquard is also an antique dealer and interi- 
or decorator. She still regards her waistcoats . as 
a sideline, begun “because my son wanted 
something extravagant to wear that was not 
vulgar.” She has been doing a brisk trade in 
these waistcoats, winch range in price from 
1,000 to Z800 francs, or about 5175 to $490 (for 
a Louis XV dmguet, the name given to a three- 
tone weave with particular relief). Her collec- 
tion of waistcoats also features 1930s couture 
fabrics designed by and for the great names of 
French fashion history such as GbaneL Jeanne 
Lanvin and so on. 

Which naturally takes you a few steps away 
to an antique couture shop favored by “many 
American and British women over 40 who dress 
up a lot, go out and have fabulous lifestyles,” 
according to Didier Ludot, the owner of the 
shop by tbe same name at 20 Galerie Montpen- 
sier. 

Ludot has dearly done everything to make 
his establishment as unlike a secondhand 
dothes shop as possible. His mannequins, 
-“—^g the fashions of the ’30s to the “70s, 



Andffc Le Ndtre, the 17th-century landscape 
architect, and was recently rehabfliiaied by the 
American Marie Rudkin. He has reconciled the 
French gardener's apparent aversion to nature 
with an Anglo-Saxon love of vegetation. 

Decorative hybrids are a specialty here, and 
few are more striking than Les Salons du Palais 
Royal Shiseido, where tbe Japanese cosmetics 
firm invested 10 milli on francs to create a shop 


and room to promote its image, 
i Galerie de Vi 


At 142 Galerie de Valos, Seige Loren stretch- 
es the limits of interior decorating with hand 1 
painted walls and ceilings featuring a bestiary of 
dancing insects, suns and moons set around a 
superb spiral staircase. Les Salons, despite theft 
Japanese “imperial purple” cdor scheme, em- 
body a fantasy of French luxury and late 18ti* 
century decor. ; 

The Palais Royal offers natural inspiration to 
a number of interior decorators. The quest tor 
refinement is given a particularly effete twist 4 
54 Galerie de Montpensier, where a leading 


British firm, Mlmaric, Henry and Zervudachi, 
L In Englanc 


has its French offshoot. In England, tbe firm's 
clients include people as unrelated as Eric Gap- 
ton and Jacob Rothschild but Tino Zervudachi 
refuses to divulge the names of any of his 
French clients. He opened the Palais Royal 
branch, which has a shop stocked with just 4 
few beautiful objects on the ground floor and 
an apartment-cum-showzoran on the first floor, 
two years ago. Zervudachi does, however, comj- 
ment that the French have “a much more ana- 
lytical approach to decorating and are less into 
showy pieces than the En glish. " ' 

An analytical approach may indeed be be- 
hind tbe choice of quite a few of Jeanne GanE 
bertdeLocbe’s choices, across tbe garden in the 
Galerie de Valois. A framer director of Jansen, 
once the largest decorating firm in the world 
whose clients included the shah of Iran, most of 
tbe Gulf states and the White House, Gambcrt 
de Loche says she took over the shop thret 
years ago, after Jansen went out of business, to 
“provide the things I like to my clients." • 


Waistcoat from UEsealier cPargenL 


sporting the fashions of the 30s to the *70s, 
offer very wearable items for prices ranging 
from 3,000 francs — for a little blade couture 


dress — to the occasional extravaganza at more 
than 50,000. Typical prices hover around 6,000 
to 9,000 francs, tor a Gits chiffon dress of 1965 
for example, or a 1953 suite by Paquin. 

A little further along is the boutique where 
Ludot sells secondhand ready-to-wear. A Cha- 


nel Boutique suit here costs only 6,000 francs. 

are! are 50 percent 


Prices fra contemporary appa 
cheaper than the original price. 

The boutique also sells luxury bags and lug- 
gage (the base Hermte Kelly handbag can be 
had for 8,000 francs), including the occasional 
exceptional item, Hke a crocodile suitcase with 
its original assortment of ivory and silver flasks, 
containers and brashes at 27,000 francs. Ludot 
also deals in old shoes and custom jewdry at 
the same address. 


Ludot has been at the Palais Royal for 20 
years, and has been following the rise of the 
garden and galleries from somnolent decrepi- 
tude to new chic. 

Little of the 17th century remains in tbe Palais 
Royal, which owes its current form to the Due 
d'Oritans, who buflt the arcades, apartments and 
shops surrounding three tides of the rectangle to 
be rented out for profit to cover his debts in the 
late 18th century. 

As in any shopping mall in Europe or the 
United States, the architecture here mainly 
aims for effect Yet, such is foe quality of 18th- 
century French buildings that only a purist will 
point to tbe tackiness ofthe composite columns 
that adorn (he houses' facades. 

A sense of forma] beauty is achieved by the 
arcades and their worn flagstones and by the 
old garden, whose overall design goes back to 


S HE has a limited number of contempo- 
rary creations and likes to concentrate 
on what she calls ’40s “colonial art’'; 
artifa cts from tbe colonies, sometime? 
made expressly for the European market 
Many of Gambert de Loche’s pieces are on the 
ironic side of the politically correct. Her Valla 
ris ceramics are equally challenging xo received 
ideas about good taste. * 

Gambcrt de Loche’s sense of humor offers a 
welcome contrast to the serious air of luxury 
tfut is increasingly permeating the arcade! 
winch used to be the beating heart of Paris is 


tbe 18th and early 19th centuries, when cafts, 
al clubs and houses of in reputfe 


shop! political — ^ 

drew throngs of Parisians. With some signs of 
decay existing, the Palais Royal remains, for the 
tune being ax least, a pleasant time capsule; a 
place of repose where strollers can only regret 
that the two caffes with their garden terraces are 
tacky and overpriced. 


Pari^ 1 ^ me ^ an ** a f ree ~iance journalist based 


CALLING ONE FOREIGN COUNTRY 
FROM A N O T H E R IS NO 


Whether pure trying to reach another country overseas, or call hack toAe US.. Sprint Express* can help. Just dial tbe access code of the country you're in tu reach an Enelishspeaking Sprint operatoc You dart «« 
customer. All you need is a U.S. local calling card or WWridTravder F0NCA RDf” If you're calling the U.S.. you can even call collect. But next time you call, use SprinffomSlt ran iMkeWSr 


have to be a Sprint 


SECRET 


Americas Sams 
o Antigua 
Argentina 
AestnBa 
Australia 
+ Austria 
Bahanss 
A Barbados 


w ITH THESE SIMPLE ACCESS 


TU 

Me 


a 


CODES 


BdinrfHotriJ 
Belize ilTI |n|t»«r 
/Bermuda 
Bolivia 
Brazil 

A British VirpiIsL 
Garin* |Pbwaftrir}8D-D14)l 
-"'Caafcodb iPW« Ui 22R0 
-Cauda l-800-S77-«M» 


633-1000 

OOI-HOO-777-1111 

008-554-00 

OOH-8HW77 

Q22-9034H4 

V800-389-ZI1I 

1-800-877-8000 

ffUUM 

556 

■4 

1-800-62.1-0X77 

WQ 0 - 3 . 1 U 

UttMOIh 

umumaxw 


Ode 
/ + China 
Cotombm-Ei^Bdi 

Cdomba-Sparash 
+ Cisia Rica 
+ICypras 
+ Czech RepsbGc 
■f Denmark 


0040317 

tt-U 

980-0-0910 

980434110 

no 

(W0- 900-0! 

0 M 2 -WH 87 

80014877 


ADoonan RepofaBc V-8WV75V787J 


Ecuador 
+EISalvadiir 

-fFUand 
+ France 
+■ Germany 
+ Greece 

+Guaieinnla 

▲Hondurfe 

Hongkong 


171 
191 

9800-HG84 

1940087 

0004)013 

0084UHTI 

195 

(WHMH2l20nO 

800-877 


AHoorKobr 
+ /H ungary 
+b* 

In do ne s ia 

+Iiriaad 

+had 

+ta*r 

-I- Japan 
+Japan 
/Ksmya 

44Korea 
t Korea 
tKona 

+ Korea 

Kuwait 

+lieriileHstca 

/Utimmia 

Lratunlmuig 


on 

W4SKMR4577 

000437 

00- 80145 

1- 800-55-2001 
f77-B2-2727 
172-877 
0tl.19-l.il 
l)Wih45>H77 
0800-12 
009-16 
55Q-2USS 
SHONE 
003943 
800-777 
155-9777 
84197 

mums 


o Macau 
+ Malaysia 
Mexico 
+ Monaco 
-frNettefamk 


(800-121 


time you call, use Sprint Express. It ran make foreign countries seem a little less Foreign 


9>«10-K77-«)00 

1940087 

064022-9119 


+Nedietknds Antilles 00l-MW-71>nH 
New Zealand OOfl-W 

Nicaragua 02-161 

o Nicaragua iMaaagni 161 
+ Norway 05041077 

Panama 115 

AoParacuav IWM2-NK) 

/Peru '■ 1% 

PbOppiiKS 1054)1 

(ETPI status onhr| 

/PfeSppnres 102-611 

(FUGoa) 

[jin 10546 


f Poland 
+ Portugal 
-Puerto Rico 
+flRoasuii 
+nRassa 
+ Russia | Moscow | 

+ Saipan 


OOIMSMHB 
«50m*77 
WO0-877-8OOO 
OM004B77 
M954554H33 
155-6133 
23541333 


+nTndmaid Rots 1-23541333 


+San Marino 
Saudi Arabia 
+ Singapore 

/ + Sooth Africa 

Spain 
ASl. Lock 
+ Sweden 

+ Switzerland 

oTtiwsj 

/Thailand 


172-1877 
1800-15 
80«: 177-177 
MOO-994M0I 
WMMflLl 
187 

020-7994)11 

155-9777 

0MHM877 

®WW-U4I77 


Con»rti«(n5twoa?*«itaoi»^toopMi^caflreBa*3^^ Liaeosjwa a dram fte aim rigara^asmaraniteB or afliMotraiMnaBstflB»Siyw<ce»gito*wptiiiBeoMan, 

eourrtrYBiai»Brrc3irinBavalJli*ty_ UteGto6WC*ng ‘SSinunaer SPIN (pMoa UanWicaUon rwntel GWalCstSng rate fljptr start taw 

■ jn warms, a*, the ta wi cp w to cornea you to meScmt Operator mfCJJ 


° Trinidad & Tubauo 11 

+Tnriugr ” M800-J4477 

+ United Arab Ensues 800-Dt 
United Kingdom , w, 0500480477 
United Kingdom isr i 0800-890*77 
A tinted Kingdom 050G-80Q-800 
~iLs»4. immaaoa 

— ILS. Vojdn hbods UO&-877-8090 
°°Unjgua)- 000417 

+ Vulcan CSy 172-1877 
Venezuda-Eradish 800-1 1 1 HI 
Vencaida-Spanish KHD-llJI-] 


Sprint 

Be there now. 


ANat»att(ehDmD3VBtm» ■feonBortw msv reoae special axle CtfUcdoperaar tar BiUafloa -FOwCAROMlrg CoSadcafeUS WminaBwwtv 

phones. BBfifrt Man. ocu tor une OtendUCB* lAaiatealmtayphonesoniy Aaitatefranftte0Wphone» MwMfctronna — B u aHenote iilncaJ.lonqtkstafKecJa^mayiTOty 


WaridCupUSAM 

'OiHM 


4 








*' 





w 



Si 




6* 


. 

• 

h " 


;? rv tu 

■*!N 


. V_ ' ■ 
’ * r ^“ 1 




in. 







diti 


lot. 


.* : h. 



** 


International Herald Tribune, Tuesday , April 5, 1994 


Page 11 


!£-V 






r-x?.- 


? Royal 


■••V t 





THE TRIBINDEX 108.160 

gMMsaa'sa.'ss ssmbsS 

by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1 , 1992 = loo. 

120 — 







-*t-- T >.&*?>#■■ ‘ 

..'.A. -i'f •- 

9Q V T ■. 

• ■ : V> ; ' 




.- .v'f 


N 0 

1883 

J 


M A 

1894 

| Asia/pacific 


Europe ! 

Apomx. we^ifeiQ: 32% 

Close: 12127 Prey.: 12651 
150 


Approx, neigtaing: 37% BBW 

Class: 108J8 Prev.: 109.58 HHl? 




The ridtor trades US. doBar values of stocks kx Tokyo, Naw York, London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria. Belgium, Brad, Canada, CMs, Dmmrk, Rntand, 
France, Germany, Hons Kong, Italy, Meodca, Nstbwtsnd* Naw Zealand. Norway, 
Singapore, Spain. Swndan, SwttMriand and Venezuela. For Tokyo, New York and 
London. She index Is compose d of the 20 top issues In terms of market capftxfeatfon. 
ottmnrtsa the ten tap stocks are tracked. 


| Industrial Sectors | 


Hon. 



lion. 

Pm. 

% 


dem 

don cteigt 


dOM 

data 

dunga 

Energy 

104.58 

105.48 -0^5 

CapM Goods 

108.04 

109.34 

-1.18 

UtWas 

118-33 

121J3 -1-87 

RzwMstorfab 

11734 

11837 

-0.70 

fimnee 

111^2 

115.08 -i83 

Consumer Goods 

85.05 

95.62 

-0£0 

Services 

115J5 

11847 -096 

IfisceBaraous 

123.47 

124.74 

-12B 

For mats mfomratfoa about the Index, a tookigt is avzMabte free of charge. 


Write to Tnb Index, 181 Avenue Charles do Gadb, 92521 NeuNyCedex. France. 


© International Herald Trfcuna 


Disney 
Loses 
Its No. 2 

Frank Wells, 62, 

Aided Rebound 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LOS ANGELES — Frank G. 
Wells, the president and chief oper- 
ating officer of the Wait Disney Co. 
and a key part of one or the biggest 
turnarounds in American corpo- 
rate history, was killed in a helicop- 
ter crash Sunday during a siding 
expedition in northeast Nevada. 

The death of Mr. Wells, 62, who 
led Disney with Chairman Michael 

D. Eisner for the past 10 years, sent 
shock waves through an industry 
where management stability is rare. 
Mr. Wells and Mr. Eisner formed 
the second-longest entertainment 
company regime in Hollywood, be- 
hind the Warner Brothers duo of 
Robert Daly and Terry SemeL 

“There are no words to express 
my shock and sense of loss,' 1 Mr. 
Eisner <aiH. 

Disney was in danger of being 
dismantled by a host of corporate 
raiders when Mr. Eisner and Mr. 
Wells were tapped to hold it togeth- 
er in 1 984. In a coup eventually led 
by Roy E Disney, the nephew of 
the founder, Walt Disney, the com- 
pany's former regime was ousted. 
Roy Disney bad become disen- 
chanted with a company that he 
once said seemed to resembled a 
real estate concern more than an 
entertainment business. 

The new leaders turned the com- 
placent company around, making 
the thane packs turn a profit and 
turning out such popular films as 
“Splash," “Beauty and the Beast," 
and “Aladdin.” The company add- 
ed a major retailing business and 
became the leader in selling borne 
videos. 

Until last year, when the compa- 
ny’s earnings were dented by losses 
at Euro Disney SCA. which is 49 
percent owned by Walt Disney Co., 
the Eisner- Wells partnership bad 
been pure gold. The company’s 
market value leaped from S2 biQion 
when the two took over to $22 
bOfion by late 1992. 

Mr. wells and other Disney ex- 
ecutives became the best-paid exec- 
utives in the United States. In 1989, 
See DISNEY, Page 12 


A Sour Note in the Tango 

Political Jitters Weigh on Latin Funds 


By Kathryn Jones 

Neve York Times Service 

NEW YORK —Larin Ameri- 
ca funds, after posting remark- 
able returns last year, showed 
their volatile side in the first 
quarter. Mainly because of polit- 
ical and economic uncertainties 
in Mexico, these funds ended the 
period with small losses and nar- 
row gains . 

The Latin America funds had 
a strong January despite the 
bloody Chiapas uprising in Mex- 
ico, and continued performing 
well in February when the Bolsa 
hit a peak. 

But in March the peso weak- 
ened against the dollar, and 
Mexican stodes slipped, as spec- 
ulative money that had flowed in 
from foreign investors flowed 
out after approval or the the 
North American Free Trade 
Agreement. 

Then Luis Donaldo Colosio 
Murrieta, the governing party’s 
presidential candida te, was as- 
sassinated, shaking the markets. 

“Things were looking O.K. 
until the last week of March,” 
said Eileen Sanders, who follows 
emerging markets for Morning- 
star fro, the mutual-fund rating 
agency in Chicago. 

The Scudder Latin America 
Fund, which surged 743 percent 
in 1993, fell O.o perc e nt in the 


first three months of this year. 
Fidelity Latin America ended 
the period off 8 percent. 

Despite such poor showings, 
the Latin funds outperformed 
funds in other emerging markets, 
notably Hong Kong and else- 
where in Southeast Asia, where 
markets declined. 

The Latin American fund 
m a n agers, ever bullish on their 
long-term prospects, are warning 
investors to lower tbeir short- 
term expectations. 

“The returns last year were 
spectacular, so there was an ex- 
pectation that that would hap- 
pen again this year." said Wil- 
liam F. Truscott, a principal of 
Scudder, Stevens & Gaik Inc. 
and assistant portfolio manager 
of the Scudder Latin America 


Fund. “Investors should be more 
cautious this year." 

Ms. Sanders said she expected 
continued volatility. “Events in 
Mexico are far from over," she 
said, and a recession is widely 
expected there. “In the long 
term, though, it win be a blip an 
a very bumpy line.” 

Among closed-end funds, 
which have a fixed number of 
shares and are traded on stock 
exchanges, Mexican funds were 
Ml particularly hard early this 
year, Cohn Mathews, a Morning- 
star analyst said, aiding. “My 



be a pretty bumpy ride an the way 
op to the elections [in August].” 

Mexico is not the only problem 
for investors in Latin America. 
Brazil, which had strong econom- 
ic growth last year, lows more 
uncertain this year because of 
presidential elections in October 
and lingering concerns about in- 
flation. 

So far tbisyear, the major index 
on the Mexican market h«s de- 
clined 143 permit, while die 
comparable Brazilian market in- 
dex has risen 41.9 percent 

Those two markets account for 
the majority of Latin investments. 
In the smaller markets, Argenti- 

See LATIN, Page 12 


Northrop Wins 
Bidding War 
For Grumman 


Prices Jump in Chinese Cities 


Compiled try QirSioff From Dispatches 

BEIJING — Inflation reached an annual rate of 
25.9 percent in China's 35 laigest dries in February, 
with staple food prices rising the fastest, the State 
Statistical Bureau reported Monday. 

Despite government efforts to limit escalating food 
prices, vegetables cost 533 percent more in February 
than in the year before. Gram prices rose 39.9 percent, 
meat prices rose 31.7 percent and seafood products 
were 37 percent more expensive. 

The government said nnxdi of the inflation was due to 
price gouging by middlemen and unscrupulous vendors, 
and has ordered local governments to send price inspec- 
tors into markets to roll back inflated prices. 

Last week, the government sent inspection teams to 
whip local governments into line on rts price control 
policy. Regulations issued in January outlined price 
ceiling s and limits on retail profit margins for food- 
stuffs and daily necessities. 


China is especially wary of inflation because the 
combination of runaway prices and an ec o nomi c 
downturn provided millions of supporters for the 
democracy protests in Tiananmen Square in 1989. 

“These fierce price rises should be watched closely, 
and chaotic or opportunistic price hikes must be 
curbed," a government eoonoxmst said. 

The government’s target for nationwide inflation 
was an annual 10 percent, but in the first two months 
of the year, inflation has been running at 20 percent. 

The bureau did not specify which city nad the 
highest price increases, but named 18 in which infla- 
tion registered between 26 percent and 39.3 percent 
All of the 18 cities named were in the eastern half of 
the country, the majority of these in coastal areas, with 
the notable exceptions of Xian and UrnmqL 
Conversely, nearly all the cities with inflation rates 
of less than 20 percent were in the interior. 

(Bloomberg AP. AFP) 


Compiled hi 1 Our Staff From Dispatches 

BETHPAGE New York — 
Grumman Corp. on Monday ac- 
cepted a buyout offer from Nor- 
throp Corp. of $62 a share, or S2.17 
billion, ending a month-long bid- 
ding war and creating one of the 
largest UJS. military contractors. 

In a letter to shareholders dated 
Monday, Grumman’s chairman. 
Rcnso CaporaJi, said the company 
agreed to be acquired by Northrop 
for $7 a share more than a bid sub- 
mitted by Martin Marietta Corp. 
Grumman had previously agreed to 
accept that bid. 

Gramm an's board on Sunday 
“unanimously adopted” resolu- 
tions stating that it bad determined 
that Northrop's bid was superior to 
the one made by Martin Marietta, 
according to a filing Gr umman 
made Monday with the Securities 
and Exchange Commission. 

The new company is to be called 
Northrop Grumman Corp. It 
would have more than 40,000 em- 
ployees, annual sales of more than 
$8 billion and firm orders of more 
than S13 bQHon. 

“The combination of Northrop 
and Gr umman is a great strategic 
fit," said Kent Kresa, Northrop 
rhairman and chief executive. 

He said that Northrop was pay-, 
ing a “fair" price, and the acquisi- 
tion would be neutral to this year’s 
earnings and boost those in 1995. 

In a letter dated Friday, Mr. 
Kresa had said Northrop, maker of 
the B-2 Stealth bomber, was willing 
to pay up to $66 a share for Grum- 
man. and would give “serious con- 
sideration” to malting higher offers. 

Will Street arbitragers, who had 
sent Grumman stock to nearly $65 
per share in recent weeks on hopes 
of a higher bid, were disappointed 
with Monday's mice. Giumman’s 
stock plunged S3 per share cm 
Monday to $61,625. 

Shares of both suitors fdL Nor- 
throp stock lost $2,125 to $37.75 
and Martin Marietta dropped 
$130 to $4230. 

The bidding war started March 
10 when Northrop made a hostile. 
$60-a-share offer for Gramman, 
topping Martin Marietta’s previous 


merger agreement at $55 a share, 
vahied at 51.9 billion. 

In a brief statement Monday, 
Martin Marietta said raising its $55 
a share offer “would not be in the 
best interests of Martin Marietta 
stockholders," It also said the $55 a 
share offer expires at midnight. 

Northrop, seeking Grumman's 
JSTARS aircraft- borne radar sys- 
tem as a complement to its jet con- 
tracts, had been talking with 
Grumman for about a year before 
the Martin Marietta deal came 
along. In their talks, Northrop bad 
said it would be willing to pay at 
least $50 per share for Grumman. 

Northrop executives reacted to 
the Grumraan-Martin Marietta 
deal with bitterness, and Northrop 
came back with its hostile bid, rare 
in the defense industry. 

Northrop executives were infuri- 
ated that Grumman had agreed to 
pay Martin Marietta $50 million 
plus up to $8.8 million in expenses 
if another company wound up buy- 
ing Grumman. 

Last Friday, Martin Marietta 
sent a letter to Grumman that ap- 
peared to concede defeat. Martin 
Marietta said Grumman could not 
merge with Northrop until Martin 
Manetta received the $58.8 mfition 
in expenses and termination fee. 

Martin Marietta's chairman, 
Norman Augustine, also said in the 
letter that Grumman could not 
merge with Northrop while the SS5 
per share agreement was still in 
effect. 

Martin Marietta, based in Be- 
thesda, Maryland, has finished 
much of its consolidation in the 
rocket business by purchasing GE 
Aerospace and die General Dy- 
namics space launch division. 

Wolfgang Demisch, an aero- 
space analyst at BT Securities, said 
he suspected Mr. Augustine was 
unwilling to enter a higb-stakeswar 
for Grumman “where you don’t 
have the same kind of control" over 
the process and price paid. 

Under the agreement signed this 
weekend, Northrop would also be 
entitled to a $50 million termina- 
tion fee if Grumman’s board decid- 
ed to accept a rival offer. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 


Thinking Ahead / Commentary 


Can the West Survive Its Own Success? 


inter) 

w 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 

’ASHINGTON — Is the world 
now safe for capitalism? Has 
the West won for good? Four 
, r and a half years since the fall of 
the Berlin Wall, it is becoming fashionable in 
American academic circles — though not yet 
political circles — to critique the West’s 
strengt hs and weaknesses in the aftermath of 
its Cold War victory. 

The agonizing over American decline that 
marked the late 1980s has long gone. So has 
the “end-of-history” triumphalism of the ear- 
ly 1990s. Now the more sober question is 
whether Western free- market democracy is in 
gpod enough shape to establish itself more or 
less worldwide, under American leadership. 

Will the West split into waning camps now 
that there is no common extern al thre at from 
communism, and nationalism appears to be 

on the rise? . . 

Will Western free-market principles gov- 
ern the global economy, or wM they be 
eclipsed bv new philosophies, perhaps based 
in Asia? What does the West need to do to 
ensure that its interests will prevail? 

A debate conducted m the New York- 
based World Policy Journal is producing 
spirited exchanges between optimists and 
pessimists about the Wests future 

On the optimistic side. Darnel Deudney 
and C. John lk en berry, both of ^eUmverrity 
of Pennsylvania, argue for the residence of 
the West’s common values, backed up by 
international institutions ranging from 


b a non-Wcstem sea, and hopes' for an era of 
peace collapse." 

This is the land of debate that ought to 
have happened when President George Bush 
announced a New World Order without do- 
ing anything to make it come about. Now at 
least some members of President Bill Clin- 
ton’s administration arc asking the questions, 
even if they have only partial answers. 

(hie such is the proposal by the national 
security adviser, W. Anthony Lake, that the 

The failure of rival creeds 
means free-market democracy 
has been given another 
chance. 

Chid War strategy of containment be re- 
placed by one of enlargement of the commu- 
nity of free-market democracies. 

That community, of course, is cot monolith- 
ic. The brands of capitalism practiced by, say, 
the United States, France and Japan, the 
West’s only honorary Asian member, are quite 
different — and the differences look sharper 
now that communism has beat defeated. 

Germany and Japan are increasingly flex- 
ing their muscles to assert their own interests 
over those of their partners. 

There is a growbg recognition, even inside 
the U.S. administration, that Asian values 
will play a greater role in the management of 
the global economy — although that role is as 
yet undefined. 

It is obvious that the balance of world 
economic power is shifting against the West, 
and other countries are demonstrating that 


Western-style democracy is not always a pre- 
requisite for economy success. 

As Mr. Gratings points out, in the past 25 
years capitalism has flourished under East 
Asian regimes that have been highly authori- 
tarian. 

Meanwhile, much of the democratic West 
is bogged down with slow growth and, espe- 
cially in Europe, heavy and debilitating un- 
employment The United States, while grow- 
ing faster, faces horrific social problems, to 
which its economic and political system is 
still far from producing answers. 

But the West is nevertheless trying to ex- 
pand, through the North American Free Trade 
Area in North, Central and soon South Ameri- 
ca, and, in Europe, through the incorporation 
of Central and Eastern Europe into the West- 
ern fold. The first developing country. Mexico, 
is atom to be admitted into one of the West’s 
most exclusive dubs, the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Development. 

The optimists argue that despite its appar- 
ent divisions the West, including Japan, is in 
fact becoming more homogeneous as its 
economies and political systems intertwine, 
and more firmly fixed on the path of peace. 
Even if three major economic blocs emerge in 
America. Europe and Asia, they do not neces- 
sarily have to fight one another. 

Mr. Lake's enlargement doctrine is at least a 
start, even if it is undear bow it changes an- 
ything in practice. Much more though l needs 
to be given to its implementation. The world is 
not yet safe for capitalism or democracy. 

In the words of air Michael Howard, for- 
merly of Yale and Oxford universities, “the 
failure of rival creeds does not mean that our 
own is bound to succeed, only that it has been 
given another chance." 



^Cross Bates 

Amsterdam 


April 4/March 31 
ea Lira D.W fcP. S-A Yen CS Paste 
‘ “ji ra UW* U*J «■*' U77- 

Utt rP. iuh • TUO HOU US Kfl JUS* 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


* - Tim ««• MW* **•- UD >-357 lOT' 

is Iir aw — HUS am so as- 

MS 51.105 XU® gjffl 41546 • LUST M»- ISM 12277- 

■Sifiort 1in 109 TZis lov uu w» Ml JW W ua >M 

IjHB (al MW mu MU* 71*5* UTS Wll WUS* *WW — 

hS C7J83 ^ BA UXUW Vi» UM HIS) 

Wto uttK a»"> Si u» JUS MB raws uw wu 

mwYortK) UUS ° “5 UM4- «■» 1,457 «*W 

SfrI, £7T M7» UW TTj! J 49 Ism Tttt Ml* UB 

mis >5* flj TJ ISr w urn uw — un- 

tas *£ S !5 5E- was UW- — UW- uw uw 

Ut UP* *** ** 11M SJBB 


Dollar D-Mark 


SWIM 

Franc 


Sterthi* 


French 

Franc 


Parts 
Tokyo 
TMM tO 
Zurich 
1 ECU 
1 SDR 


Yen ECU 

1 month 37*3% 5%*-*. 4**4ft SVWft MVU 

3 months 5* rS-ft 4IW*. SW-SH SMr i* 

« months 4VWfc SVtSVk *4Wi S*-6fc 5%-flfc 2*4k. 4 

1 yscr 5«rS*w 3 «iw4k. 5%»4h. S*w4k. 2 7 * 

Sources: Reuters, Uords Bank. . . 

Rotas tm^UaUUe tkikutank deeaslh of SI mnPon mtntmvn { graauNoientf. 


”177 n, A, asm uwa- — 

Ul 2901 ua m Win w KM 

I ECU UM6 ™ 

15011 ,40B 

New York. Tekva. Tomdormri 7^^ 

March 31. l _^ La ^Ne«Yt>r*'**m^ ft ^ m ^ cwn, ™ Tonn ^ 

Closings tn ^ ^ 

mffiafSojn. nnr tSottofi Units of Iflfr Mft- Pat qiBttd, HA- net 

rotaafStsm- .. b: n» Our or* oatar. 
a: To buy V* «**' 0 

available. * “ ' 

Pur* 


available. April 4 

°* hwDc ^ v ^ S s SZS-”'- 

SSS- g STS. B SEES 35 SSL SS 

AutfraLJ to* ugae. lariat Z7J0 TtMi 2Ut 

Antr.scML lIMflannlP** ^ pnllinzMtY 2211*. TWItSI 2&2S 

RrazH cna. WJ30 |hd&ra pta*i m . esanS 173JJ Tarto fiSra 2209. 

0**KV"* ^ “S ££n£T 1T7U0 UAEdMom 1ST. 

CWA “ rW, ° Bra* 1 ***- ^ £Srt*nl USB VwthMtv. 11X07 

Dantaikrmm A«15 KlMom *acr SM .s >jn 

EoYntpeiw* 22= mww.rw- 

Ftamorucn **77 ApriM 

Forward ****** **** 

cmw, US 'X SSSS" 

POOM Sterfhw SS 13985 

DMltsdieMW* , *221 1/222 (Br usse isH Banco Commerdakr IWImb 

(Toronto): l*?* 50 * 1 ' 


.1.7 


Key Money Rates 

Untied states Ctose Prev. 

DiKssafratc 30» 3JP 

Prime rate 6V1 6 M. 

Federal funds 3* 3ft 

Smooth CDs 351 142 

Comm, saw US dan 4.15 W 

3-aesfh Ifremonr MU 143 1ST 

T-VW Treason WIT 440 4M 

2-YwTraawry note S5S 133 

SwTreomnrnoto 441 4 M 

Mmm- TVeaswy note t7B 457 

W-vwTreawnr note 7.13 4JM 

3Meor Treasury bead 741 755 

Merrill Lyncti 30-day Ready asset 244 254 


SU» 

5ft 

CUd 

5ft 


5ft 



Sft 



5ft 

— 

7M 

5.90 

SX 

CISC 

4ft 


400 



400 



5 ■ft 

— 

447 


DtseeWrate 
GoN money 
l- mwrtb interho nh 
3-mantti kitei buk 
fr— mmimtiin 
s-nor Ocyer nm eot bond 

Germa n * 

Lombard raw 
CaQ aimer 
v-montb InWrbaek 
3-morttti bttenxmk 

smaantmerteak 

SnwBnd 


lft 

2ft 


lft 

2ft 


2ft 2ft 
rw. 2ft 


214 

IUL 


4ft 

Clsd 


2ft 

187 


4ft 

5ft 

5J5 

5ft 

545 

427 


Book base rata 
CSlnMMV 
Hnaotti Werintk 
SdWRlb IMertmik 
4-month ime rt e s fc 
ts-ycarunt 
France 

Intervention rate 
CoKiaeaev 
HMBIt UM Bl tM * 

SmodthlarnrhaoK 
Smooth Ma twt i 
T^YCCff OAT 
Sources: Reefers. Bloom bore. Merrill 
Lynch, Bank of Tokyo. Commenbenk. 
Gmrtmrii Monfoou. CrddU Lvonnaa. 


Gold 

AML PM. O.W 
Zurich Ctosed 

London Cl ose d 

New York *170 

UAdollon per ounce. LandonorikM ax- 
mast Zonal and Hew York epentao and do* 
lag prices; Hew York Convex (June) 

Source: Routers. 


Quite simply the Royal Oak, 



j* 

warsBght 

The master u'alcbmaker. 

Kcir infiimuikn ;ind « .n:iU>piir. pk-.ik- « rile in: 
Auknur. 1’ipiK.n & C3i- SA. 1.4* U- Uw^us. Sftii/crl:mil. 
Trf. il 21 Si<5 \i)M Fov il 21 Kl4 ii li 



W- 

dy 

Sh 

»y. 

■u- 

'er 

al 

ks 

'cr 

JL 

t>- 

■ti- 


uu 

of 

or 
• ial 
ue 

es 

a 


■ y 


‘ p . 

in 


al 

of 

ite 

or 

nt 

3D 

lis 

d. 

al 

d, 

•rt 

in 

b- 

3C 

in 

Q- 

al 

a, 

D- 

ry 

s- 

s- 

3- 

V, 

31 

lg 

to 

C, 

le 

e. 

t- 

te 

1 - 

it 

£ 

1- 


* - 
a 

B 

l, 





a, 


Gn 

F 


AA 

B 

C 

n 

Si 

AA 

B 

C 

G 

C 

H 

T 

AS 

E 

F 

F 

G 

U 

AF 

AH 

B 

F 

L 

Air 

A 

A 

B 

C 

C 

G 

G 

G 

H 

H 

It 

lr 

L 

N 

St 

T- 

T 

U 

u 

V 

V 

vt 

A U 
A 
In 
In 

V 
AH 

C- 
G 
in 
AS / 
Act 
in 
A 
9 
Act 
Ao 
Act 
Ait 
Act 
Alt 

G 

G 

H 

In 

IV 

S< 

Art 

A 

B. 

G 

lr 

All 

G 

In 

V 
Si 

AJQ 

A 

B 

B- 

& 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

lr 

lr 

lr 

lr. 

u 

u 

V 

u 

tJ 

N 

N 

tl 

N 

tt 

V 

V 
H 
N 
1C 
« 
W 
IV 

w 

« 

w 

IV 

AT 

N 

IV 

N 

N 

N 

N 

P 

P 

Q 

S’ 

ST 

T 

W 

Air 

B 

B 

E 

G 

L 

R 

An 

An 

B 

B 

C 

G 

1C 

lr 

lr 

9 

Air 

B 

C 

G 

lr 

lr 

9 

T 

An 

B 

C 

G 

Br 

lr 

9 

T 

An 

E 

F 

lr 

An 

B 

E 

lr 

L 

An 

C 

c 

c 

c 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

F 

F 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

H 

H 


EUf 

U 


u 


l£ 


Mi 

Cn 


Tm 

Me 


Page 12 



** 



U.S./AT THE CLOSE 


Rate Outlook Helps 
Dollar Keep Gains 


Via Auoexited Pr#»t 


NEW YORK - The dollar, 
buoyed by the prospect of higher 

rales - beM onto the 
bulk of its sharp gain of two pfen- 
nig on Friday. 

The U.S. unit closed at 1.6955 
Deu tsche marks, down slightly 
from 1.6972 DM on Friday. 

Traders had bought dollars 
heavily on Friday as inter est rates 

Foreign Exchange 

climbed following a government re- 
port showing the biggest gain in 
jobs since 1987. The Labor Depart- 
ment said the economy added 
456,000 jobs m March, double 
what some analysts predicted. 

But traders said that the U.S. 
unit's rise had still been firmly 
capped below 1.70 DM on Monday 
and that there was little incentive to 
test that resistance level ahead of 
the reopening of European trading 
rooms on Tuesday after the Easter 
holiday. 

They said the general expecta- 
tion that the Federal Reserve 
Board would push up interest rates 
for the third time in the near future 
continued to provide support for 
the dollar. But they added that it 
was not sufficient to encourage 
fresh buying until there was a clear- 


er indication of when German rates 
will resume their downward path. 

In the absence of other fresh fun- 
damental news, dealers said that 
Wall Street's rebound from early 
weakness despite sharp drops in 
the bond market had been a major 
contributor to the dollar’s stability. 

The only reason the dollar did 
not “fall farther is that people ex- 
pected stocks to decline’ 1 by a wid- 
er margin, said Keith Ch eve rails, 
an exchange trader at First Nation- 
al Bank of Boston. 

Against other currencies, the 
dollar was quoted at 1.4250 Swiss 
francs, down from 1.4267 francs on 
Friday, and at 5.7958 French 
francs, up slightly from 5.7940 
francs. The dollar slipped, howev- 
er, to 103.145 yen from 103.65 yen. 

The pound tumbled to a seven- 
week low against the dollar amid 
concern about Prime Minister John 
Major's political future as opposi- 
tion mounted within his party to 
recent policies. The pound 'was 
quoted at S 1.4665, down from 
SI. 4735 on Friday. 

Meanwhile, crude oil futures in 
New York surged on Monday by 
98 cents, to S15.77 per barreL'as a 
result of a technical rise spurred by 
strong buying by commodity 
funds. 

(AFX, Bloomberg, Knight-Ridder) 



Dow Jones Averages 


Open High low Last aw- 

MdV* 3552.18 3*3589 3552.47 3S93J5— 42.41 
Trtms 1406.93 1435.19 160X98 1606.94— 2125 
UtU 193.98 194.38 19134 192.99 —339 
comp 127248 129746 1271JW 1279.39—1848 


Standard A Poor’s Indues 



High low cine Clrt* 
521.16 509.73 51X34 —742 
397 Jll 39UW 39226 — ATS 
15643 15242 15143—250 
<243 41 j0? 4147 — 044 
44547 43546 43852 — 645 
41243 483.16 40690 —543 


Emerging Now 
It’s African Stocks 


NYSE Indexes 



VoL Hfeh 

Low 

Last 

atg. 

Cnrvslr 

51*07 51% 




TeiMex 

50787 59% 




Morck 

46*79 29% 





39551 54% 





3*360 49% 










■ 1 ■ 





K •- 1"® 





30055 14% 









GenO 

36925 100% 

9*% 




2*845 31% 

79% 



GtiCorp 

24710 37% 


3A% 


Cocoa 

■ ■ M 




Exxon 

23709 *2% 

*0% 

*0% 

—2% 


MARKET: Calm During a Storm 

Continued from Page 1 


Robert Walberg of MMS Interna- 
tional, who said he thought the 
market had more room to faU, 
pointed out that “thq F are usually 
the last to sell and they will pay 
dearly." 

There was no sign of large-scale 
mutual fund redemptions, al- 
though Wall Street expects singed 
bond fund investors to continue 

cashing out and fleeing back to the saying it planned to cut 25 percent 
safety of bank certificates of depos- of its work force while it seeks other 

revenue sources. Paralion said it 


throp fell 2ft to 37% and Martin 
Marietta slipped 1ft to 42ft. 

Magainro Pharmaceuticals 
plunged more than half its value, 
losing 7ft to 5% after it said its 
leading drug, which is used to treat 
a serious skin infection, showed no 
statistical advantage over a place- 
bo. 

Parallan Computer, a vendor of 
server equipment that sells exclu- 
sively to IBM, fell 414 to 6 ft after 
saying it planned to cut 25 percent 


NASDAQ Host Actives 


Nouefls 
SunMIc 
Ciscos 
Mas 
Intel s 

Licon 

One sox 

TbIChiA 

MfcSftS 

3Com 

Orach? s 

Adaims 

GrtFnd 

Sattwx 

TefefMcw 


VoL 

Mali 

Law 

Lost 

am. 

*055* 

17% 

14% 

<*'-■ 

— IV. 

51829 23 

21% 

22 

—5% 

48516 33% 

32% 

33% 

— 1% 

4*»72 23'--i 

22% 

22% 


39170 67% 

65 

47% 

— % 

37*01 

1% 

1 

IV E 

-V a 

31132 

17% 

17 

17% 

- 

29988 

20% 

19% 

20% 

— % 

21905 

85% 

8? 

84% 


19223 

55% 

52% 

55% 



17599 

31% 

30Vi 

30% 

— 1% 

17080 

15% 

14% 

IS 

— % 

167 57 

14% 

13% 

Mis 

— % 

1*101 

14*5 

14% 

14% 


1*09* 

3 

7?- b 

*V r 

— Vr 



Misti 

Low 

Last Chs 

Composite 

Industrials 

Transo. 

Utility 

Finance 

247.0* 
304 5* 
252.48 
20885 
204.19 

241.79 

297.95 

24766 

203.43 

19985 

343.14 — X92 
30082 —9.54 
248 8* —4.12 
20487 —488 
20074 — X4S 

NASDAQ Indexes 


tfigh 

Law 

Lost dig. 

COmpasile 

Industrials 

Banks 

Insurtsioo 

Finance 

Transo. 

7*480 
BOX B0 
*858* 
896.94 
B8X17 
769.34 

72142 

75584 

6*2.14 

8*380 

B60-71 

732.98 

72853—16.93 
759.93—19.10 
*6X41—1X17 
8*374—1*89 
8*080—1184 
735.00— 16.16 

AMEX Stock Index 


High 

Low 

Lost CUB- 


443.11 

433 81 

434.13 —8.98 

Dow Jones Bond Averages 



Close 

Ch-go 

20 Bonds 

10 Utilities 

10 Industrials 


9987 

97.9* 

10160 

— 069 

— 065 

— 084 


NYSE Diary 


By Leslie Eaton 

AVx York Times Service 

NEW YORK —Africa, particu- 
larly that part of the continent 
south of the Sahara, has become a 
hot new target for international in- 
vesting. In the last two months, 
brokerage firms in New York have 
floated three new funds — and 
raised more than S350 million — to 
invest in Southern Africa. 

And according to Fund Decod- 
er, an industry newsletter, four 
more funds are in the works, in- 
cluding two that plan to invest 
across the continent 

There is good reason to be hope- 
ful about the long-term investment 
prospects for many African coun- 
tries. The coming multiracial elec- 
tions in South Africa and the end of 
sanctions bode well for that coun- 
try and for many of its neighbors. 

Economic reforms that are 
sweeping across Africa may ua- 


Dhridends 


Company 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Toft* issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


Close Prev, 
371 
2124 
320 
Z8T5 
3 
625 


753 

1537 

525 

mo 


472 


AMEX Most Actives 


U-S. Stocks 


its. from whence many of them 
came when interest rates fell to 
record lows last year. Interest rates 
on CDs are rising again as the Fed 
tightens monetary policy. 

Henry Kaufman, a noted Wall 
Street economist and money man- 
ager, said a bond rally was likely 


may break even for the first quar- 
ter, which ended in March. IBM 
lost lft to 53. 

Wool worth fell 2'/< to 1278 after 
the retailer's c hairman and chief 
financial officer resigned on a tem- 
porary basis while the company 
probes possible accounting irregu- 
larities. 

Federal-Mogul Corp. fell Vi to 


SPDR 

ExnLA 

HanvOir 

EchoBoy 

RovalOB 

ENSCO 
IvoxCp 
OievSItS 
Jan Ben 
VtocS 


VoL Mgh Law Lost 
25178 44i/ a 43"/,. 43 'ST, 
13335 1%. iv,. 


7748 6% 
5746 13% 
6018 4'/] 
5333 3*. 
5185 24V. 
5168 25% 
5135 6% 
4052 25% 


4% 

1216 

4% 

3V„ 

73', 

23>, 

5*i 

25 


I’m. 

*% 

12*0 

49., 

3”., 

231, 

25': 

6 

25% 


atg. 

-*s 


— 11 , 


• % 
—11, 


Market Sales 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


date Prey. 

127 212 

557 454 

167 197 

845 863 

5 4 

99 74 


NASDAQ Diary 


dose Prev. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


791 

2754 

1418 

4963 

14 

387 


1303 

2004 

1555 

4M.1 

11 

251 


Spot Commodities 


NYSE 

Anwx 

Nasdaq 

in millions. 


Tod or 
4 p.m. 
34286 
21.34 
287323 


Prev. 


481.17 

2964 

41X«5 


Commodity 
Aluminum, lb 
Coffee. Brae, lb 
Cooper electrolytic, lb 
Iron FOB. ton 
Lead, lb 
Silver, fray az 
Sled I scran), ton 
Tin, lb 
Zinc, lb 


Today 

no. 

0765 

B.S5 

moo 

034 

£583 

13633 

*1 AW 

04486 


0586 

0765 

D.9S 

213X10 

034 

XJB 

13633 

rua. 

04505 


Per Amt 
IRREGULAR 
Assoc EstatesRity 
Pilgrim Prim Rote 
Super Tr CapMkt 
Zwelg Stral a 

STOCK SPLIT 
Brown Forman 3 tor 2 solii. 
Peoples Bncn OH 2 lor 1 split. 

INITIAL 

Secur Conn Co 

OMITTED 
Bccba's Creations 

REGULAR 

Acme Cleveland 
AMRE InC 
BICCp 
Baker J Inc 
Blacfcrck CA Inv 
Blocfurck FL invOua 
BkKScrck NJ InvOua 
Btodmck NY invOua 
CSB Fnd Co 
Camay Bncp 
Commerce Bk V* 

Conrmrdl Assets 
Comm aear+tse 
Curlier Bunts 
Delmarva PwrLt 
Fst Franklin Co 
Hunt JB Transo 
Keystone Fncl 
Morrison Restaur 
Muni Adv Fund 
Natl City Cp 
NnTWest CapSec 
Nevada Power 
Penn SauareMull 
Penoucoi Shoe 
Sadller Willi lam 
5andy Coro 
tca Coble 
US West 

linl farce Temoarary 
Zwelg AtetAssetA 

Zwelg ST GvISec B 


Pay Rcc 


leash growth. Some African na- 
tions are rejecting the socialist poli- 
ces they adopted after colonial rule 
ended. Others are being pushed to 
reform because old sources of mon- 
ey. such as payments from rival 
superpowers, have dried up. 

But there are enormous risks for 
overseas investors, particularly in 
the short run. They include politi- 
cal instability, weak currencies, 
fledgling stock markets and, ironi- 
cally. the very fact that investing in 
Africa is becoming such a fad. 

“There's more money being 
raised now than there are hocks in 
Africa. It can't go on,” said James 
P. Rogers, who was an early inves- 
tor in African stocks. He now has 
holdings in Ghana, Botswana. 
Zimbabwe, South .Africa and Zam- 
bia. as well as in companies that do 
business in Nigeria, Kenya and the 
Ivory Coast. 

The allure of Africa is its poten- 
tial for economic growth that win 
far surpass that of the industrial 
nations. A few African countries, 
including Botswana. Ghana and 


Manufacturing Expanded in March 

NEW YORK (AP) — American manufacturing expanded for the 
seventh straight month in March, a trade group of corporate purchasing 
managers said Monday. s 

The National Association of Purcha&ng Management said its 
manufacturing activity rose to 56.7 percent from 56.6 percent in February 
A reading above 50 indicates the manufacturing economy is expanding/ 
“We had a very strong month of production in Marche said Roben j ' 



iu iviuwg v'n ui iivw vnuud diiu twbUVg Ul UiUCrS. - 

Prices, a key indicator of inflation, continued to rise in March, bat at a® 
more subdued rate than in February. The association's price index fell to 
64 3. percent in March, from 67 percent in February. 

Drugstore Deal Costs $600 Million 

TWINSBURG, Ohio (AP) — Revco DS Inc. said Monday that it had 
agreed to buy Hook-ScpeRx Inc. in a $600 million deal that would create 
one of the biggest drug store chains in the country. 

Revco, which has about 1200 stores, said it would pay SI 3.75 a sham 
for Hook-SupeRx's 20.1 million, shares. Hook's stock rose $3 625 a share 
to 512.75 after the announcement 
The 5600 million figure includes assumed debt from Hook-Sura Ri 
Hook-SupeRx operates nearly 1,200 stores in 22 states. Revcolaid the 
deal wouldstrengthenitspresence in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Maryland, West 
Virginia, Virgmia and Tennessee. 


IBM Machine Fights the Networks 

NEW YORK (Reuwra) — International Business Machines Com « 
launching the first of its low-cost rmaoprocessor-based 
computers m a bid to restore falling revenues in its core business. 

Analysts said IBM would announce on Tuesday two machine with 
parallel processing architecture, one designed for transactions and anoth- 
er for large database queries. 

jui -jwiuwmj wunauu, uiuud ouu T he c omputer giant is also to add five new nrnrigfc iq jjs in y» of AS/9000 

. 40 4-is h Kenya, nave sustained growth rales ro a nrfra n K S and make some aggressive moves in software pricing. 

I j? ^7 £u ^ 5 percent a year in their gross , struggling to return to consistent profit and revalue growth, hac 

en fnrmi tniiMl hniI,<i,>«*...l. ... . p 


4-7 

>31 


4-15 

4-11 


.12 4-u 4-30 


O .11 

a _D3 
o JC 

0 .015 

M .0555 
Aft D656 
M Jfcfl 
M .8455 
. JJ75 
Q .15 
O .15 


54 5-20 
4-11 4-29 


.175 

.16 

-385 

.125 

85 

32 


□ .0833 
M JJ75 
Q S 
O 4921 __ 
O 40 4-11 
M £3 4-4 

O JH 5-25 


33 6-24 
.03 4-15 
.11 4-U 
535 4-20 
sn 4-15 
XS 3-31 
03 3-31 
038 3-31 
033 >31 


of 5 percent a year in their gross struggling to return to consistent profit and revenue growth, t 

national products, said Michel been forced to deal with the move by computer users to lower-cost PCs. or 
: ZhuPanis, a portfolio manager for clients, naked together in networks by hardware boxes called server* 

' Morgan Stanley Asset Manage- controlling the data and functions. 

: meat in New York. IBM hopes that its new generation of marnfre m^ wfl] help delay 

Morgan Stanley nine one of the 0151011105 ^ rom converting to the client-server environment. 

, closed-end funds floated this year. _ 

, Founder to Sefl Four Seasons Hotels 

TORONTO (Combined Dispatches) — - Four Seasons Hotels Inc’s 
shares sank after ils founder, Isadora Sharp, announced over the weekend a 
he intended to sell the worldwide hixiny hotel ® 

Four Seasons stock lost 37J cents to I a 50 Canadian dollars fS7_55V 
su^nsmg analysts who had expected the stock to jump on the news. 

The luxury hotel chain, based in Toronto, said it had hired Goldman. 
»chs & Co. to find a buyer for all publicly hdd shares and, then after 
threeto five years, to acquire the block held by Mr. Sharp and his family. 
Mr. Sharp, 62, owns 18 percent of Four Seasons’ equity, but controls 70 
percent of the votes. (Reuters. Knight-Ridder) 

General Mills Cute Cheerios Price 

NEW YORK (Knight-Ridder) — General Mills Inc. said Monday it 
would cut prices on its largest cereal brands, such as Cheerios and Wheaties, 
by 1 1 percent on average At the same time, it will reduce spending on canal 
coupons and promotions by more than 5175 million annually. 

The company said the number of coupons issued by cereal manufactur- 

fS ilxlQ fiinwn hv HifliVin m fnvtr umw nrl*n« .f _ 


... agemem's Southern Africa Fund 
4-70 «v and Robert Fleming's New South 
tS t» Africa Fund, 
ill ; Much of the new interest in Afri- 
tu t?a • ca began in South Africa, where the 
*is .‘ sro* market is relatively large and 
” wdl established. When sanctions 
were lifted last year, foreigners 
rushed in. 

In 1993, South African share s 


4-12 4-27 
4-15 4-29 
4-14 430 ; 

4- B 4-U ! 

5- 3 5-19 1 
4-12 *3 I 

4-11 4-39 ; 

tif l rose 26 patent on average, accord- 
£if ' “£ !o Birinyi Associates. 

^ ! Other African markets havx 




Jg I shown even more spectacular in- 
^2 ] creases, at least in local currencies. 
; Last year, for example, stocks rose 

4-1T 
4-11 
4-n 


CKimtMd; g-poratile la Canadian tonds; m- 
monititr; o-auan prir; s-stnu-aamal 


; 41 percent in Nigeria, 67 percent in 
- Mauritius, 2 16 perc en t m Ghana. 
117 percent in Kenya and 161 pa- 
tent in Zimbabwe. " 


soon as European countries Iowa igi/Sw 51™, feU V< 10 
mierest rates. But he warned it ^ «>mpany 

would not start a bull market be- i 1 ^.^ nnw ^- to close a dislnbu - 
cause of major structural change 
in world finance ran ging f rom 
high octane” portfolio managers 
working with borrowed money to 
the attraction of foreign and espe- 
emerging markets. 


DISNEY: Frank Wells, 62 , Helped Eisner Save the Magic Kingdom 


W«ffcfd Box OffVc* 


. _» volatility in financial mar- 
kets will increase and periodic trad- 
ing rallies will tend to be short- 
lived,” said Mr. Kaufman, who 
earned the nickname of Dr. Doom 
for his accurate forecasts of i 
rocketing interest rates during 
inflation of the 1970s. 

Wall Street now seems set for a 
long slog, with its length and inten- 


Con turned from Page 11 - 
Mr. Wells earned more than 550 
million, making him the highest- 
paid California resident. In late 
1992, Mr. Wells and Mr. Eisn er 
exercised stock options worth a 
combined 5257.2 million before 
taxes, which created controversy 
among shareholders. But analysts 
defended the move, citing the com- 
pany’s performance during their 
tenure. 


si ty dependent on which guru is 
talking. Most are touting a correc- 
tion of 10 to 15 percent from its 
recent highs, which, if they are coi- 


tion facility and a packaging plant, 
cutting about 160 jobs. 

Genemech jumped 2Va to 46H 
after the biotechnology company 
was raised to “strong buy” from 
“buy” by David Molowa. an ana- 
lyst at Bear, Stearns & Co. 

Eh' Lilly & Co. fefl % at 49W after 
the drug maker recalled several 
prescription oral antibiotics be- 
cause some customers reported 
finding plastic caps inside the hot- - 

ties. 

depositary receipts fell 3ft to 56ft LATIN: Growth in Funds Stalls 

in heavy trading, tracking a plunge 


Hie company's stock value rose 
16-fold under their tenure and rev- 
enues from theme parks and resorts 
tripled, the company said. In late 
trading in New York on Monday. 
Disney fell £ to 41%. 

Mr. Wells, a lawyer, also was a 
former vice chairman of Warner 
Brothers Inc., which is now part of 
Time Warner Inc. He was political- 
ly active, and was one of the key 
business executives who stepped 


The Associated Pros 


LOS ANGELES— “M^jor League U" topped the weekend box office, 
g P nai cam- gaavouve wah^on the rar^an^t^$7rnim<m.F 0 fl( W mg are tiieTop lOmoneymakejs 

According lo John Tavlofs 1 987 based c.Fnd.ynciei rales and csr^s^ for S Mmday and Sundn,. 

Jfnrmino the* told Mf. Gold OVCT IUDCh. 


■ —wi mp iW IVIIM iUflUl a l/«| 

“Storming the Magic Kingdom 
book on Disney, Mr. Wells met 
with Stanley Gold, an adviser to 
Roy Disney, ahead of the I9S4 
shake-up. "Hie meeting, ironically, 
led to Mr. Eisner’s hiring, although 
Mr. Gold was sounding out Mr. 
Wells for a job. 


(LAT, AP, Ratten, Bloomberg ) 


To subscribe in Franco 
just cofl, toll free, 

05437437 


1. "Motor Laaou* ll" 

2. -0Z The ftftlgmv Ducks" 
IThePopar- 
♦."Naked Gun 33V) " 

S "Scfilndtors Ust" 

6. "Above me Rim" 

7. "CntfanT “ ' 

8 . * nu * Tib « rilHD " 

9. "The House of Itw Seirtts" 
W. "Guartfinu Tesa" 

10. "Monkey Trouble" 


(Warner Brothers) 
(Walt Dhnev Pictures I 
(Universal} 
{Paramount} 
(Universal) 

- (New Unn Cinema) - 
'f Orton Pictures} 
(Warner Brothers! 
iMIramac) 

(Tristan 

(New Line Cinema) 



. ~ — “J O' — “6 “ i/iuaigv 

in the Mexican stock market Mexi- 
co’s Bo Isa index shed 6 percent on 
Monday on evidence that the assas- 
sination of the leading presidential 

rect, meam lh^ market u Almost ‘f 1<ii( ^ le ^ a conspiracy rather started slipping this year, some the unit of T. Rowe Price that n 

there man the act of a lone deranged fund managers reduced their expo- a 8 es international funds. “It is 

Mr. WaJbere ntwl!rt S a in gunman. sure, citing a possible recession and a <»c-trick act” he said. 


Continued from Page It 

na’s index is down 4 percent and 
Chile's is up 3.7percenL 
Even before Mexican stocks 
started slipping this year, some 


Mr. Walberg predicts a 20 per- 
cent drop by autumn because of the 
attractions of European bond mar , 
kets and the Japanese stock mar , 
ket He said fund managers would 
take their cash out of Wall Street 
and split it between the European 
bonds, in a gamble on Iowa rates 
and higher prices, and Japan, in a 
able on an economic recovery 


Meanwhile, be forecast that Wall 
Street would be growing only in 
single digits for two to five years. 


Last week, the government 
averted a panic after the assassina- 
tion of Luis Donaldo Colosio by 
pledging to defend the currency 
and quickly naming another candi- 
date. The belief the killing was the 

gwfriS flexibility shmiM investors 
no Jong term political impact. But start nniima nm >n /im<w ai~* :• 
the conspiracy theory coold mean 

aiiiiihnn maIUim! 


sure, citing a possible recession and 
concerns that stocks had become 
overpriced in anticipation of the 
trade pact 

The Scudder fund has shrunk its 
assets in Mexico to about 39 per- 
cent this year from 43 percent and 


and depth to the economic and 
political reforms instituted by the 
current administration, said Wil- 
liam F. WendJer, vice president of 
the unit of T. Rowe Price that man- 
not 


Mr. Wendler said companies 
stood to benefit as the government 
spent more money on infrastruc- 
ture and addressed the domestic 
problems that spurred the Chiapas 
revolt. “Mexico is going to be the 
locomotive for Latin America," 
Mr. Wendler said. 



Own Hfcti Low Cos* CM) OpJnf 


growing political uncertainty up to 
the elections on Aug. 21. 

( Bloomberg, AP) 


start pulling out m droves. Also, it 
would be capable of picking up 
stocks at attractive 1 


ock5 at attractive pnees. 0 

The Merrill Lynch Latin Ameri- SlITI S flimn iP.g 
can fund had a lighter Mexican 


— - ****** «k U^UKI iVJCAiUUl 

Asian Stocks Drop in Step tfian its peers Iasi year On Sales View 

ThmuMi.-*,, - nr nn V* and will remain cautious this w>r vfjj. uoioo " lew 


Hie weakness on WalfeirceLalso yat ' 

The Nikkei 225^tock index lost . G J La “? Growth 

0.8 Dcrcenf amid connem that hiot»_ °P C « the oldest and best 


Cyclical stocks, such as auto, pa- 
pa, chemical and heavy machinery 
issues, led broad-markk losers on 
Monday, while the Nasdaq index 

was pulled down by technology v.o pereem amiq concern mat high- ™ « u «i wu mi- reacting to a wamine from the 

stocks, wire services reported. a U.S. interest rates could arorrot LaM American fundi comnuLr i . 

Sun Microsystems plunged 5ft to American invest? Sbrii^S Mrai - last K thS^?S<S^S 

22 after saying its thiid-quarter rev- money home. Malaysian stocks f 5 tobetween 30 and 33 percent eaue would be 
=o UC was^ bdow analysu cxpccta- drop^d 3J9 p^ ThS ^p^matlheb^tagof 

s m , 3 ^ -? §*?**»' c... 


Bloomberg Business News 

MOUNTAIN VIEW, California 
Shares of Sun Microsystems Inc. 
fell nearly 20 percent on Monday, 
reacting to a warning from the 


*0JD 8,957 
- OjQIVi 11478 
+ tLD2 1JB 
•08j ijn 
•002 317 


tions. Merrill Cynch and 
PameWebber cut ratings on the 
maker of computer workstations. 

Novell fell 1U to 16ft in active 
trading, while Intel lost ft to 67ft 

C._. J j ,u . 


on Mexico,” said Soraya Betterton, 
the fund’s manager. 

Still, she and other fund manag- 
ers said they expected long-term 
growth in the Mexican stock mar- 


percent, and Singapore 
fell 1.97 percent and Philippine 
shares dosed 2.J3 percent Iowa. 

The Asia component of the In- 

, — - — ■ - leraational Herald Tribune World 

and Cisco Systems dropped 1ft to Slock Index fdl 156 percent to 
"Jj* 123^7. 

Grumman fdl 3 to 61 1 ft after “The immediate knee-jerk reac- 
agimng to merge with Northrop tion is to hold off on all equity 

1 1 "vu- 111 ®sh, or a total of investment until the sky is clear on rurLDermore, Mexico s reiatrveb 

Marietta rSm M ?T tin 831(1 Nandigum, smooth handling of the recenTS 

Manetta Corp. < 555 offa. Nor- with Baring Securities. ^ ses displayed sine SnT™^ 


Sun Microsystems shares dosed 
at $22, down $5 J75. Sun Microsys- 
tems executives were not available 
for comment. 

At least four analysts reduced 


ket and that certain indicators, like 

low interest rates, were favorable f or Sun MicrosystaS ra Monday, 

nnmhnA «*n - 


for economic growth. 

Furthermore, Mexico’s relatively 


pointing to the company’s surprise 
announcement about third-quarter 
revalue last Thursday, after the 
market dosed. 


Grains 

WHEAT (CBOT) SJniuiTilainni.Mvevbenl 

H? JS 1111 130 i 3 * 1 * 14^94 

X5» 2.96 JL494 3JSV| U9 1 22M 327 -OIXW1 T\J£3 

157% 182 ScpH 325% SJIFa 325% 179 -OD3to 3,913 

165 329 Dec 94 3JQ% 329 133% 328 -DjOhV, U78 

156V1 324 Mor9S 137 348 327 3M -<L04V. 1» 

325 116%Mor9S 140 +0JU% 1 

342% 111 Jul95 123 +083 69 

gi.sdes 13200 Thu's, soles 74B1 
Thu's open W 47J87 off 266 
WHEAT IKBOT) SAloumriiiMn-iiAnpirBuM 
329% 288 Mov94 X34h 136 132% 134% 

155 297 Jut 94 325V> 327% 123% 125% 

155% 102»Sep94 325 128% 325 326 

160 112%Dec94 134 134W 322 ’A 132% 

153% 323 Mar 95 3J4 

gF-srtes HA. Thu'S. SCSeS 4218 
Thu’s open inf 74270 up 588 
OORM (CBOT) Mntaimmniiim.«Ana«rliifriifl 

- 238%Mav74 127 227 221% 222 — 082% 101065 

141 All 94 2J0% IBOVi VS'lt 226 — 083% 119.054 
140 Vj Sep 94 288% 220% 265 266 %— OSH 26244 

236fa Dec 94 2319% 260% 72* 256% +080% 

253% Mot 95 2A5» 267 2j63% 263% 4281 

166%Mav95 269% 120 268 268 +081% 37S 

172% 269 269% 1J8S 

— 7^9% Dec 95 2J0 251% 7.50 2SDW +080W 981 

a. sates 85800 Thu'S, sales 61J87 
Thu's ogari tot 321461 oft 1329 
SOYBEANS (CBOT) SAabumMknum-aosmpCTMtfMl 
/Si 5.92% May 94 626 626 % 6J2 6J2%-429U 52168 

524V) Ail 94 629% *29% 6J3V, VJOJ 

*28 AuoM *21 67) 647 667 l25 MX 

6)7 5«.94 649 649 *28% 628% — 029% ua 

5J5Vjfiov94 6J3 63, 616% 617 — 0J8V, 31492 

61BMJOI9S 641% 641% 621% 622%Zo27% 3.1» 
642 Mar 95 64* 64* 628 tJS -03t>h IS 

60 May 95 646 647 630 630 -Un 48 

642%JUI9S 650 650 631 631 -827 397 

5JnV>Nw9S 612 612 698 698 -417 1.U4 



116% 

116% 

191% 

123% 

179% 

212 

283% 

2J>S% 


750 

735 

689% 

757% 

67S 

673% 

670 

675 


21200 

23080 

22380 

21080 

20600 

20980 

20080 

19480 

19150 



650% 

stuns TIWLscies 4&.990 
Thu'sapunlnt 152127 ell CVS 
SOYBEANMEAL (CBOT) lODim-aoteB^M 

J85J0MO7 94 19120 19220 IB670 18620 -600 24^*5 
Jf 100 1! K» 185-20 18660 ^780 26263 

1*150 18600 18620 -850 6801 

■MJOSwW 1*150 191^1 18480 18430 — 8JD 6911 

187.10 Od 94 18980 18980 1B220 18180 —2 JO 3,558 

4£DecM 10080 1 8080 18180 18180 -780 MBS 

UW50Jan95 18750 18650 18150 18150 -750 

IH'SS Mar9S 190100 1Ja ® 1*1® 18400 —780 126 

18850 May 95 19080 19080 18580 18S50 -650 61 

EaL tales 40800 ITU's scies 17801 
Tht/sapentot 77,962 off 38 
SOYBEAN OU. 1CBOT) tunt».a+ 

3045 21 JO Mav 94 2858 2 la 

29.70 21 55 Jul 94 2140 2140 

2950 21 55 Aug 94 28JH 2885 

2050 2205*094 2758 2750 

77 iO 221000194 2657 2*57 

27.05 0.90 Dec 94 2610 2615 

2685 2165 Jan 95 2680 2680 

26*5 2659 Mir 9S 2690 2690 

2660 2620 May 95 2585 2S8S 

2640 2S57JUI95 2550 2550 

Esf. st*es 26000 Thu's, tain 14880 
Thu's open M 99517 off Bit 



into. 



27 J7 

27 J7 

—180 29.120 


2771 


2787 

77 Jl 

-879 


268> 

2*89 

—079 

>,W 

3S*7 

2*86 

-8.97 


2544 

254+ 


2580 

25-30 

-180 


2580 

2580 

-087 


2525 

2585 

-471 


2X25 

2S25 

-065 

9 


Est.srtes 1X576 Thu's. safes 1710 
Thu'tooentoi 

SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSE) IIUDDb 
BJ0May94 11.95 
9.15 Jul94 1217 
9520094 11 Jl 
9.17MO-9S 11.35 
HL57Moy95 11J7 
1057JU95 1157 

-- 10570095 1189 

sales 20.022 Thu- v Hies 10880 

Thu's open W139.1S3 up 204 
COCOA |NCE) lOircMckH-sacrion 
1360 978 May 94 1140 1147 1116 1122 

1345 999*1194 1170 1175 1144 1151 

1020 Sep 94 1197 1300 1175 1180 

>389 1041 Dec 94 1234 1237 1912 1318 

1077 Mar 93 1263 1243 1230 1251 

1400 1111 May 95 1292 1292 1265 1270 

5* 223 -M 95 005 1305 1305 1292 

S 55SPS U24 1326 1325 1311 

1437 133SDK 95 1342 

ESLirtBS 1X696 nw'vsrtes 6893 

Thu's open ku 87.747 up 908 
mANGEJucE menu iMn% rDH , H riL 

JSS ,CBJ5 1ftus ,0 'J» nn jo 

1B7J “ 10175 10415 10613 _**, wa 

I52&P* 4 109 J0 11080 10750 10750 -^580 tm 

3S5 r l ,OW ™ ! WlW 109 ' 00 10450 104.10 -455 *154 

*55° 103-50 Jai 95 1HU0 110J5 10780 1D78S -480 X109 

1H25 10480 Mar 95 11125 11285 111625 110J5 ^580 

«fci 5800 Thu's, sabs 4J35 
TlWsopflnW 19-541 UP 87 


MUMCrALBOMB (CBOT) nntMSHPSiMiitloiM 
104-y to-23 An 94 89-16 89-17 87-13 87-17 — 1 27 36016 
»; ,7 »MPSep94 87-27 H-0* 86-20 86-23 — 1 26 12? 

EsJ. sate HLOOO Thu's, tatos 7KB ** 

Tto/sopenlnt 33,133 up 2329 • 

H7HOOOLLARS (CMER) TlmiBat-rtaeliaopa. 


-« 27852 
-27 26355 
-35 9,968 
- 6877 
— 1* 10J83 
—72 6534 
2439 
_ 711 

-22 320 


—695 7/444 
—60) 632* 


—50481891 
-11021650 
— 14029X117 
— 180252,9*7 
—190197,572 
— 00014X713 
-300130871 
-20011X95} 

» 


Metals 

HI GRADE OOPPBI (NCMX) TLSaa bm.- craft per p. 


9125 

1Q2J0 

91 JO 

1UL95 

HQJ0 

101.90 

OOAO 

9980 

107 JO 

91 JO 

91 JO 

91 as 

9185 

*0.15 


8780 

8880 

87.90 


8485 

8780 

8680 


8840 87JB 


91.95 

»J0 


8780 


8670 

B7JH 


11,1(1 


8780 

8780 

8880 

8780 


87.40 

8780 

0785 

>780 

8885 

8880 

8835 

8853 

8870 

88.90 

09.10 
8880 
>980 

90.10 
U.15 
8985 
8985 


1,171 
+ 185 3X416 
180 814 

+0-90 164*0 
+0.90 4857 
♦085 4851 
+085 106 

+ 085 31 

+0JG 1,757 
+0J3 544 

+085 
+080 
+0-55 
+ 0.90 I >9 
+090 1 

045 237 

+040 SB 


Livestock 


Madrid 


BB V_ 3090 3150 

BCO Ce ntral H bp- 2870 2915 
Banco Santander 6290 6500 


Baierte 

CEPSA 

Draeados 


Ercros 
Iberdrola I 
Rapsal 
Tabacalera 
Telefonica 


Z730 2790 
2220 2285 
*840 7110 
150 150 

96A 993 

40*0 4265 
3600 3800 
1620 16*5 




Markets Closed 

Stock markets were 
dosed Monday in 
most of Asia and in 
Europe for the Easter 
holiday. 


Montreal 


A loon Aluminum 
Bank Montreal 
Ddl Canada 
Bombardier B 
CamMar 
Cascades 
Dominion Te>i A 
Donohue A 
MacMillan B! 
Natl Bk Canada 
Power Carp. 
Quebec Tel 


30% 30% 
25% 26% 
4?Vj 44% 
20% 21 li 
2014 20% 
7% 7to 
7% B 
26% 77 

204* 21% 

no 9% 
20 % 20 % 
33 27% 



Sao Paulo 


Bancs do Broil 

Brahma 

n ara nop u nemo 

ValeRla Dace 


25 28 

1051 1110 
1480 1580 
205 215 

19 21 

116 128 
35.10 4080 

_ I64« lS 

KZSS5 


Singapore 

Cereboi 
City Dev. 

DBS 

Froser Neove 
Gen ting 
Golden Hope PI 
Haw Par 
Hume industries 
indKooe 
Keopel 
KL Kspong 
Luni Chano 
gta^afl Banks 

OUB 
DUE 

Seimxnwang 


Shangrlla 
Slme Darby 
SIA 

S'core Land 


695 785 
665 680 
11.10 1180 
1650 1680 
1690 15.1Q 
209 281 
116 116 
AM 480 
486 698 
9M 980 
2 M 270 
1-50 1.58 
B 610 
10.90 tlJO 
785 7.10 

680 635 
1080 1080 
486 488 
380 388 
7.10 780 
5J5 570 


i nsr™ 


— 1380 Hi 

-Jng Stoamshlp 18* 330 

Store Tetocpmm 3^2 X40 

Strolls TrxnBna 11* 188 

mRP .1° *■»* 

UOL 18* 188 


Tokyo 

Akol Electr 

Aaohl Chemical 

Asohl Glass 

BankefTakyp 

Brlitoestone 

Canon 

Casio 

Dai Nippon Print 
Datwa House 
Dal wo Securities 

Forme 

Full Bank 
Full PtWU 
FuNtSU 
HHactil 
Hitachi CaWe 

Honda 
llo Yokado 
Itochu 

Japen Airlines 
Kallmo 
Kcrnsal P ow e r 
Kpwaaaicl Steel 


Kirin Brewery 
KOrtiatgu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec inds 
Matsu Eiecwks 
Mitsubishi Bk 
Mltnibishl Kasel 
MJtsubisbi Elec 
MIlsubbhlHev 
Mitsubishi corp 
Mitsui and Co 


485 485 
.609 604 

1110 1U0 
1470 1490 
1510 1500 
1610 1610 
1240 1270 
1753 1760 
1S5D 1530 
1580 1590 
4120 4130 
2100 21*0 
2190 2200 
1000 1000 
S* *® 

.756 7*0 
1690 1710 
53*0 5420 
690 695 

645 656 

8*1 (90 

2620 2630 
349 350 

1190 1170 

®52 883 

667 652 

6410 65B8 
1700 1710 
1190 1140 
nm 2740 
470 478 

583 588 
055 051 
1100 1100 
U7 752 


Mitsukoani 

Mitsumi 

NEC 

MGK i nsulators 
N ik to S ecurities 
N toPon Kpoaku 
Nippon OU 
Nippon steel 

N& VUSen 
Narnuru Sec 
Hit 

Olympus Optical 
Pioneer 
Rfcalt 
Sanyo Elee 

Shorn 

ShJmazu 
Shlnetsu Chem 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sum Homo Chem 
5cml Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 

WZStne 

TakeaaChem 

Tellln 

Trtryo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Tawxm Printing 

mf* 

Toyota 

Yomolchl Sec 

aixUHL 

NHckel 225 : 19122 
.-J 1 9277 


924 915 

2160 Sim 
1SS 1070 
1030 1040 
1240 1230 
1010 

706 7QJ 
323 323 

5*7 5M 

•14 829 

,220 0 2230 
*03Eta 7050a 
1020 1030 

1*40 1650 

2030 040 
456 4*2 

US 875 
258 260 
*52 *54 

774 780 

1220 1200 
4200 4270 
458 46* 

1210 1220 
3180 3190 
1300 1310 
647 650 

736 743 

19?0 2B0S 
822 830 


AbHIbl Price 
Aomen Essie 


Toronto 


le*s 17% 
Irth 175*1 


Air Canada 
Alberta Energy 
AnigBmTick Res 

Bk Nova Scotia 
BCGes 
BC Telecom 
BF Realty Hds 
Bramaiea 
Hrunawk* 

Camdev 

CISC 

Conadiofi Pocinc 21W. 21% 
Can Tire A 11% 11% 
vantar 
Cara 

CCL Ind B 
a nop lex 
Com Inca 
OxtwKtExpi 
Denison Min B 
□ktcensan Min A 
Doiasco 
Dylex A 

feho Bay Mines 
Eauliv Sliver A 

FCA inti 380 JL80 

ef < U2 <1 7% 7*0 

Ftetcher Chall a 20 20% 

PPI 6% 4J0 

g«nj™ OAS 08t 

5 ol ,?9°r o _ no. ]?% 

Gull can Res 3 As 3.95 

rices Inti 13% 14% 

Hernia Gkl Mines 13*8 13% 

HoUinger ISM? 15% 

Horsham 1B% 1914 

Hudson's Bov 29 39% 

liYIasco 35V. 35% 

Jna» 33% 34% 

interpret ptoe 30% 31% 

Jannach 18% m 

Latjatt 20% 21to 

Loblaw Co 23% 34V4 

Mackenzie 9% 

Magna Inti A 63% 65 


*% 7 

18H) 19 

3 33S 34% 
49% 49% 
26% 27% 
15% 15% 
2314. 24 

0.04 0JM 
083 086 
9% 9% 

7 6*k 

— 480 
31% 32% 


42% 45% 
480 485 
8% 8% 
19S 4.15 
20 

22 23 

0.T1 0.10 

21% 21% 
HAS IL93 
I7to 18% 
087 089 


Close Prev, 


Maple Leal 
Maritime 
Mark Res 
MocLean Hunter 
Mo Ison A 
Noma Ind A 
Norancto Inc 
Normla Forest 
Moreen Energy 
Nlhem Telecom 

Nova Com 
Oshawa 
Pasurtn A 
Placer Dame 
Poco Petroleum 
PWACorp 
Ray rack 
Renalsgance 
Rogers B 

Rothmans 
Roval Bank Con 
SceoireRes 
Scotrs Hasp 
Seoaram 
Sears Can 
Shell Can 
Sherrill Gordon 

SHL System hse 
Soul ham 
Spu r Aerospace 
Stolen A 

Talisman Energ 
Teck B 

Thomson News 
Toronto Damn 
Torsiar B 
Transaha Ulil 
TrwsCda Pine 
Triton FhllA 
Trlmoc 
Trtzec A 
Untoana Energy 


12> 12% 
22% 23% 
B% SV* 
17 IBM 
24 24% 
*% 6% 
23% 25 

15% 15% 
38 38% 

9% 10 

21% 22U 

320 180 

32% 34% 
9% 9% 

1615 1.10 
19% 20 

26A, 27% 
20 % 21 % 

83% 83% 
26% 27% 
I! 12% 
7% 7% 

3g* 38% 
7% 7% 

38 ■i 

12% 12% 

9*.+ 9% 

19 19% 
ins 17% 
Cy 8% 
N.Q. 29% 
N.O. 25% 
N.Q. 17% 
N.O. 21% 
N.Q. 24% 
N.Q. 14% 
N.Q. 18% 
N.Q. 4% 
N.Q. 17% 
N.Q. 087 
N.Q. 160 


CATTLE 

(CMBt) J0600 *n_- com per 


7X20 Apr 94 

7785 


7577 

7185 Jun 74 

7440 


7387 

IDBAnH 

7245 



71 87 OCt 94 

7870 



7285 Dec 94 

7X95 



7X01 Feb 9S 



W.10 

7380 Apr 95 

7490 

7580 


76.90 

7482 

723} 

7382 

7385 

73J7 

7485 


7765 

74J2 

7285 

74-05 

7415 

7X91 

7490 


Est. sales 15824 TtVs. safes 17,010 
Thu's open tot 50/177 on 929 

CATTLE fCMSU nwh-ornwh 


T5E 380 Index . 
Previous : 432*62 


4238.18 


8540 

7980 Apr 94 

B1J0 





TA+OMoyM 51.10 






1185 





7980 Sep 94 

SI JO 




•185 

7980 Od 94 

0180 

8130 



BUB 

7745 Now 94 

SUO 

lug 




7980 Jan 9* 

61180 




Est. H*n 1811 Thu's, sates 




7HU** 00311 tot 1X1*0 

Oft 9* 



HOBS 

lOMER) <UO 




51.97 

3987 Apr 94 

4*80 




54-77 

4&Z7JM194 

5X15 




5587 

45JDJui9+ 

5X30 

5X97 



5340 

4*85 Alia** 

5087 

5070 



49JS 

4340 Od 94 

4*40 




5080 

4SJOOec«4 

4*80 



4*77 

5080 

4*75 Feb 95 

47.15 

47 JO 



mo 


4X20 




5180 

45.95 Jun 95 





EsL safes 5,951 Thu's, sales 

5,731 




+093S863 
+ 045 27,287 
‘X« 12893 
*CL43 10836 
*0-25 3871 
*027 1.296 
+ 020 132 


+ 887 X106 
~OJ5 X5I3 
+ 085 2,915 
+ 087 489 

♦ OS3 573 
+ILSB 231 
+085 M 


+ 0.15 488* 
+087 15600 
+050 4661 
+O10 2,793 
+003 1,791 
2815 
-4105 259 

-003 111 

79 


Tin's open kit 
PORK bellies (CMER) HUMUS* on. mt to. 


*180 

4080 May 94 S7.M 

57.90 

3*75 

5*85 



8X00 

39 JO Ju< «* 5780 

5780 

56.90 




59 JO 

4X00 AUO 94 5587 

5540 

5480 

5480 



*1.15 

19.10 Fob 95 SLSO 

5880 

5780 

5780 

-085 

104 

*0.90 

35*0 Mar 95 






*180 

59.90 May 95 



5760 


• 


Thu'S open H 9,)5B w 90 


Food 


9080 

*125 May 94 8140 

8180 

7980 

1X40 

B78D 

64.90 Jui 94 

BXIO 

ny 

(185 

83.13 

•880 

60. 50 Sep T+ 

>480 

(475 

0X00 

MM 

9180 

77. ID Dee 94 

8*80 

a+nn 

8*48 

(485 

B8.10 

78.90 MOT 9S 

0*80 

0*80 

■X95 

84.00 

5860 

8X»Mav95 




8680 

3980 

83.00 Jui 95 




87.80 


-180 29,919 
—160 14890 
—1.50 6817 
-180 <076 

—1-30 1,716 

—185 260 

-185 16 


7450 Apr 94 0*80 
7360 May 94 8680 

74.10 Jun 94 07 JO 

7420 JUI 94 8660 

7490 Sop 94 8*80 
7175 Dec W 8780 
76.90 Jan 95 
7X00 Feb 95 
7100Atar95 8760 
7485 May 95 8885 
7U0JI695 8880 

7380AUB95 87X0 

79. 10 Sep 95 
7520 Oct 95 
77J5Nov95 

8830 Dec 95 WM 8960 8960 

8920 Jan 96 

Est safes 4500 Tlu’s. safes 
Thu's open tot 6X761 off 955 
9B-VER (NCMXJ LUC mj* 02. - ertf, nr Buy 01 
5718 51 40 Apr 94 5574 

5818 371 J) May 94 5778 5820 554.0 5582 

Jun 94 5*88 5680 56*0 5618 

5850 3710 Jui 94 58X5 5MJ 5WO MX4 

5*90 3745 Sep 94 5900 5900 5650 567.9 

mo mo Dec 94 5910 5970 5710 5746 

5640 43 rjl Jen 95 57*4 

<040 4I6J Mar 9S 8960 960 5600 582. 1 

*045 41 SO Mav 95 5940 5940 5910 5876 

«au 490JUI9S *3* 

5650 4930 Sep 95 So* 

*340 5390 Dec 95 6150 6150 61SO 6088 

Jtn 96 610 7 

Est.K8e5 30000 Wl safes 23600 
Thu’s open tot 118664 up 758 
PLATEMM IHUER) S6lnwa..<MirtKrw>y a . 

42850 33500 Apr 9* 41800 42000 41400 nS6D 

43700 357 OO Jill 94 42300 42400 414*0 41860 

43500 368000(294 42S00 425.00 41450 41900 

s-s S2 «too fluo 

42T8J 39&00 Apr 95 47600 42BOO 422J0 42000 

EsL safes 4147 Thu's, sales 6814 
Thu's open tot 3SLSM up 1050 
GOLD (NCMX) Mn,a,dUn N ri mn . 

SSfiSL 5 !!,* 1011 38SOO 386JO -SLS0 443. 

ST2.&] MfLSSMOY W 387-40 S w 

41780 33960JU1M 39430 39520 mOO 388J0 -5^88.101 

*1500 341 60 Ana 94 3*7.10 3*088 39080 OT60 Mo 

41700 3€400OetH 39960 3»60 3»S 394H Im 

<0458 34300 Dec 94 40280 40150 39600 99780 ZSjo 14H4 

S spsasssasSs 

S 3 IS 4, “" ‘ nuo sss US 

£3 42100 42X00 42SJ8, » 3 £ 

<2450 4M5DF4BV* 42450 42450 <2280 *** 

Est safes 3X000 Thu's, safes 43831 
Thu's open int 14*8*0 up *97 


£52 ?i£d 9SJ50 ' 9541 o' ‘95820 

*5870 908*0 Sep 94 94800 94990 94800 94810 

SS 0 ^ « J 1 ® 0 ,lU,0 54210 w,2a> 

ES2 * 4,3D M - ,so 10210 

*1730 91710 Jun *5 93810 93820 9X500 9X590 

945B) VUlOSepfl 9X520 9X538 9X800 93890 

M3B0 91.180 Dec 95 9X800 93800 925W 92.970 

M220 90750 Mv 98 9X110 9X110 n £ 0 Un 

Si.** 8 * a6 ^ 71 

Thu's open W 28S7J42 up 70722 

0 55 la, ™J| o (O®0 sm+poxxi- 1 m'nri n in into! 

12150 184748*194 16670 18722 1896 18634 _ 

18980 18440 Sop 94 18*30 18670 185*0 18602 _ 

189SI 18500 Dec 94 18550 18*50 1.4H0 18582 - 

salts NA Thu’s, safes 12 Mi 

Thu'iepenM 30JB7 up 93 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) ix.p.Im.kmI.IIII 

S™ S 71 " ttJ1 ® 02113 Q - 7135 - 

SiSS 47,15 0171,3 oj m mm - 

KS H^ SDBeW 07090 03090 OJ03S 0.70*1 _ 

!KS5 ?5!5 Mar9S ° 20 * 020,0 0-7TDO HTn-n _ 

08990 0-700* _ 

sates J4A. TTW&.sc*Pi 4017 
Thu'sapemnt <X354 up 24 

eraMANMAWC (CMER) | Wn m b , plMMalllUM , 

^fes^ 0 ^^ ^ 03850 0^8*3 +5 *15 

TlBrii apento l uo83 off 95 * 

Sw ryuw 1 point equals s oqb OOOI * 

5jj25™ 20 ®jy jn W 00096*0080^*0009*220009734 +59 5B449 

mSSBS 2 : 1 s ™ 

Thu's open tot S5861 up 759 - * 

^"^^^ss’-sssTssr 

KS “■ ™ :« » 


5 30814 

: is 

s 

1 429 

41 
* 






-5 


7®'.* 


■5 ... 

hST:-. 


5.^' 


Industrials 


—198 
—198 7X319 
—198 
-19J 19652 
-198 5847 
—198 9894 
—198 _ 

—198 5840 
—19.1 1,96* 
—198 417 

—188 *9 

— 1L8 1800 
—185 


'JO 1,154 
21882 
-060 1834 
-480 
-9.10 841 


9588 

9587 

9490 

9463 


-4180 37857 
— 0.14 108*8 
-0J8 X5D3 
-41.15 40 


179829 

485 


Financial 

UST.88JLS (CMER) IIMx-MyiHM 
9476 9569 Jun 94 95.90 9400 «87 

9*80 95*< Sep 94 9555 9555 9537 

9510 9520 Dec 94 9510 9511 9490 

9505 9497 Mar VS 9478 9478 9463 

Ed. sales na. 7%j'4S46es 7J58 
1%/ s open Int 5070* up 1917 

5 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) i m n m ■ — - — , , .. .. 

112-05 10*85 Jun 94105-215 lSSTES* oS^L"°2? 

Esf.srtes *2800 Ttn/Aiales 2*898 

Thu'S Open tot MQ.1 14 up JI30 

!«»4)i»-30 104 -id ittwo !SSZ n “iSo 
Dec 9/ 103-09 103-09 102-00 1KHJ3 -107 *SS 
mllS? IntJ? W82-I7 110-17 101-09 101-09 — M 
105-22 101-22 8»95 t m.,a _{2 , 

Etf. sales mum Ttn/s. safes 54830 “ 1 

Thu'SOpmrit 33*860 is 14165 
115 TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) (lsa.|IB,IOO+h&SMit+ 

1 19-29 91-0* Jun 94 104-27 l»-S »T»-, 

118-26 90-12 Sep 94 104-01 104-07 10M4 iSSl “J l| 3MMI 
116-00 91-19 Dee 94 101-10 HD-17 in-u rt-22 Zi 1+ 
ntS «l«-23 102-27 1*1-30 101-4)1 -t l| 

JJ5-19 98-15 Jun9S 100-14 —1 ti 

I IMS 104-29 Sep 95 »-*r Z n 

U3-U ID-23 DesTS SS l{g 


cottonj (ncinj mnib^Minih 

W69 7465 

713 * 7881 77 Jl 

7 *£ | 59-SI C« 94 7360 7415 7360 

SS XSXSF™ ™ SS 

K.stSes xsoa TWLrtes 11,197 

■Du's open tot 54941 off 26 

5BB8in94 4X50 4*. TO CLIO 

sua SsSi - ^. 4110 tLti <360 

nfi 4445 47 JO 4435 

S.17 CUOSapM 4530 eesn m ai 

Sw S10 

980 4100 «* 48JD 

080 4*80 Dec 94 ease 5.05 

£25 4X2 Jon 95 SM0 5IA 

4785 Feb 93 5180 5180 n* 

^fnm^-rSrf®- 00 51 ■* 9980 

=■-, 46JB0 Thu's, sales 55827 

TtM/so oirt i n ja off 4421 

y2 rTS “^ 7 J? a » 6 WMOW lAOoeoL- 
JJ ,00 **°VW !*-89 J5as 14^5 
1407 Jun 94 1497 1590 1471 

1415 JUI 94 1585 1*80 UjS 

1X10 1407 um 

1450 Sec 94 15J2 141+ ifs, 

1435 ita {tg 
■JSEft'M 1X90 142 liS 

1493 Dec 94 1470 14» 1*1? 

Jf 15 J®'W 1564 15L8* 1484 

1450 1450 UJO 

I 075 17 - 00 14-75 

_ 1450 Dec 95 17J0 17J0 17 « 

}*X796 Thu's, sates 84484 
Thu'eopefitot 4I4M3 up lon^^ 

W^EADEDGAS«J« l mira) etMUwc. 

dSetM^So 

fl-S *410 Jun 94 47.15 4980 23d 

*410 Jul M 4495 25 

se 2* *3 

M.I5 <L 10 Oct 94 4X.Ui 

S1?® 1 *6888 Thu’s, safes 50JS1 
Thu's tfee n tot 1178 0* rtwi 

Stock Indexes 

ssses S SO SS a 

5 * T " mS£SJ ^”^"34110 —435 38*1 

£S£S « us -« j 

2*585 —430 . 


2080 

2185 

20JB 

2078 

2078 

2073 

20*9 

3010 

1781 

206* 

2080 

2080 



■JS 





2*7.90 

2*780 

2*460 


237. 15 Doc 94 
_ MorK 


i 


Sh 


4X915 

31.257 

1.100 

49 

13 


11441* 99-04 Mors* 

safes 530000 Thu'S, soies 2794X1 

Thu s open nt 470817 up 1782* 


M-31 -113 


34 


Moody's 
Rttitera 
0 J. Futures 
Gout. Resnarcli 


Commodity Indexes' 

Close 
UIMO 
N.Q. 

1402] 




Ofi 


A, 


Previous 

1^1230] 

I^JWO 

-14110. 

227-47? 




For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 


h^ k * s; > 


The conference program 

will highlight the investment 
opportunities in 
Latin America , following the 
region* economic revival. 


Latin America 

A New Investment Partner 


LONDON - JUNE 9 - 10 * 1994 

iniumcutw 

HcralbSSribunc B 


BCVCUWCNTIaMC 


FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION ON THE 
CONFERENCE: 

Brenda Hagerty 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH, England 
Tel: (44 71)836 4802 
Fax: (44 71) 836 0717 


















































































































































































































Turkey Braces 
For a Bout of 
Belt-Tightening 



Telefonica’s Overseas Adventure 

Spanish Operator Pushes Rapidly Into Latin America 


] Investor’s Europe 


Fftinl^rt --C V ! ; i : 'r^plfe :V 

DAX ■ : FTSe^oOiodex ■■ ; ;: eAfi"40; 


Compiled by Ohr Stiff Fro* Dispatch^ 

ANKARA — Prune Minister 
Tansu Ciller called on Turks Mon- 
day to “tighten their beHs" to make 
eamomic recovery possible in line 
with a set or austerity measures she 
was scheduled to announce on 
Tuesday. 

She said in a television appear- 
ance that the measures would hurt 
but that “this bitter restructuring 
was inevitable in the interest of our 
children’s future.” 

She did not say what the mea- 
sures were on Monday, but ana- 
lysts expected them to be aim^ at 
correcting budget deficits and halt- 
ing the drop of the Turkish curren- 
cy. Government sources have said 
they include a wage freeze for the 
civil service and a substantial in- 
crease of prices and taxes for at 
least six months. 

Economists had estimated that 
without the measures the inflation 
rate would have exceeded 100 per- 
cent this year, up from about 70 
percent last year. 

To cut budget expenditures to 
the bone, no government invest- 
ment are planned for Turkey for at 
least six months. In addition, price 
increases ranging from 50 to 150 
percent are expired for products 
doming under the public sector 
such as gasoline, tobacco, alcohol, 
and iron and steel. 

Rail and air fares will also be 


raised, as well as postal rates, ae- 
oording to the sources. 

TTie steps include closure of 
stale -owned companies that are 
racing losses, including the Zon- 
gukiak coal mines and the Karabuk 
strel mills on the Black Sea. 

Economic State of Siege” was 
the headline on the daily Milliyet 
on Monday on an article which 
maintained that farm subsidies 
wornd also be cut. The popular dai- 
ly Sabah, meanwhile, trumpeted 
that there would be “six mouths of 
hell and that “1994 will be a black 
year for wage earners.” 

Analysts said that the central 
bank may also raise banks’ reserve 
requirements in a bid to help the 
frail lira regain its credibility. 

Some bankers said the dollar, 
which has more than doubled 
against the lira since Jan. 1. was 
overvalued against the Turkish 
unit. 

The Istanbul Stock Exchange in- 
dex surged 8.84 percent, to close at 
16,356.48, as investors rushed to 
buy shares on the prediction that 
Mrs. CiUer’s measures would bene- 
fit the economy. 

“The first reason behind today’s 
rally is the political op timism, the 
second is cheap share prices," said 
Kerem Korur, assistant to the gen- 
eral manager at Hak Securities. 
The market had slumped 48 per- 
cent in the period between Jan. 13 
and April I. (AFP. Reuters) 


By Ana Westley 
New York Times Scntct 

MADRID — Barely three 
years ago. Spain’s telephone mo- 
nopoly looked Like a corporate 
dinosaur facing extinction, as 
competition imposed by the Eu- 
ropean Union loomed in 2003. 

Instead, Tdefbnica de Espana 
took a modest international sub- 
sidiary that once sold hardware, 
injected it with $824 million ofca- 
pital and built it into a major 
player in the international com- 
munications world. 

Hie subsidiary, Telefdnica In- 
ternational, has been snapping 
up Latin American acquisitions 
as soon as they come up on the 
privatization block ana trans- 
forming them from chaos to prof- 
it-generating enterprises. 

Tdefdnica has put two Spanish 
executives educated in the United 
Stales in charge of the unit andhas 
beaten American companies for 
deals in their own backyard. 

Telefdnica’s stock, capitalized 
at S13 billion as of Jan. 31, is 

Q uoted on Stock Ernhan ges in 
lew York, London, Paris, 
Frankfurt and Tokyo, as well as 
Madrid. The Spanish government 
owns about a 30 percent stake. 

Tdef6nica has succeeded by 
tapping its experience budding 
telephone systems at home practi- 


rivals for the deal, which included 
Southwestern Bell Corp. 

Telefdnica Intentaaonal now 
owns stakes in Argentina, Chile. 
Venezuela. Columbia, Uruguay, 
and Puerto Rico, in addition to 
ventures in Portugal and Roma- 
nia. Tdefdnica itself has become 
Spain's largest company by sales, 
accounting for 1.8 percent of the 
country's gross domestic product. 

The' company now serves a 
population of 1 10 million people 
m Latin America. 

Last year Tdefbnka Interna- 
tional’s act profit surged 127 per- 
cent, to 21 J billion pesetas. Net 
profit for the Telefdnica group 
rose 17.7 percent last year, to 
95.079 billion pesetas. 

Telefdnica. the parent compa- 
ny, developed its drills by la^ng 
new access lines in Spain at a rate 
of a million tines a year for the last 
five years. Telefdnica bad to deal 
with hundreds of thousands of 
irate customers who waited 
months, or years, for a telephone. 

By the end of 1993, Telefonica 
had wiped out waiting lists and 
had modernized much of Spain’s 
telecommunication infrastruc- 
ture. replacing old networks with 
digital and optic-fiber systems. 

Spain now has 15 million tde- 


Lots of Hookups 

Telefdnica de Espana has poured investment capital 
into overseas telecommunications and related 
companies. Here are its equity stakes. 

In Latin America Z "*•' 


ARGENTINA 

Telefonica 

de Argentina Telephone service ttfl 
Smtelar Business telephone 2231 
service 


M CTC Telephone service Hga 

Entef Longdistance L!£H 
Pubfiguias Directory publishing SOI 


COLOMBIA 

Cocelco Cellular service 



Int ema nona] Herald Tritame 


135 PERU 
J&jcPT 
Entet 


Telephone service 
Long-distance 


Inflation in Russia Slows 
To 15-Month Low of 8. 7% 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Russia got some 
good economic news Monday 
when the government anno unced 
that the inflation rate fell below 9 
percent a month in March, the low- 
est level since economic reform* 
began in January 1992. 

Consumer prices have jumped 46 
percent since the start of the year, 
which in most countries would be 
considered extremely high. For 
Russia, however, the inflation rate 
in March was comparatively low. 

The rate had averaged 20 percent 
a month in 1993. This year, it fell 
from 22 percent in January to 9.9 
percent in February and then 


dropped again to 8.7 percent in 
March. 

The slowing of inflation appears 
to be partly a delayed effect of the 
polities pursued by Boris G. Fyo- 
dorov, the former finance minister, 
in the last quarter of 1993. 

Mr. Fyodorov fought to hold 
down the government’s budget def- 
icit and tighten monetary policy. 
He quit during a cabinet shakeup 
in January. 

He also predicted that Prime 
Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin's 
new cabinet would cause hyperin- 
flation by opening the financial 
taps and Hooding industry with 
cheap credit. 


them up with heavy investment. It 
has also benefited from Spain’s 
linguistic ties to Latin America. 

“We have the best ditch-dig- 
ging technology around,” said In- 
aJri Sanriflana Telefdnica Inter- 
national’s chief executive and the 
architect behind its international 
expansion. “When it comes to in- 
stalling a milli on access lines in 
record time, no one can beat us.” 

What Mr. SantiTiaim described 
as technology is really an operat- 
ing strategy: buying the latest 
equipment in bulk, installing new 
networks at top speed and over- 

S old ones, »«mg iranis of 
twThnirignc sent in tike 
oops. 

Last month, Telefdnica bid a 
record S2 billion for 35 percent of 
Peru’s telephone companies, 
Compania Peruana de Tdtfonos 
and Enid Tail, to consolidate its 
leadership position in South 
American telecommunications. 

Hie successful bid, the largest 
made by any Spanish company 
for any acquisition, was more 
than double that of its closest 


lion. Along the way, the company 
improved its once disastrous repu- 
tation for both local and interna- 
tional phone service. International 
calls, however, remain the most 
expensive in Europe. 

Although the European Union 
has declared all member nations 
must open their phone systems to 
competition by 2003, the Spanish 
government has set a goal of do- 
ing so by 1998. 

Telefdnica International was 
transformed from a sleepy inter-' 
national sales company into a 
modern telecommunications 
competitor, with an initial outlay 
in 1990 of 79.9 billion pesetas. 

Mr. SantiDana, 45, an econo- 
mist who holds a doctorate from 
Indiana University, was brought 
in from the parent company’s fi- 
nancial planning department. 
Francisco Ros, 43, a telecom- 
munications engineer with a doc- 
torate from the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology headed 
Telefonica's technical team. 

“We decided it was time to 
share not only language and cul- 
ture, but also b usiness. " said 
Candid o Vdizquez, chairman of 
the Telefonica group, who pro- 


=*2 PUERTO RKO 

■:~j TLD Long-distance 

URUGUAY 

“*j Cekiiar Cellular service 


VENEZUELA 

CANTV Telephone service R M : : 




PORTUGAL 

Contacts) Cellular service 


Very briefly! 


• Banco Bilbao Vizcaya is seeking an alliance with Fomentos de Consonc- 
riones & Contra tosSA, the Spanish construction company, and other 
nonfinantial business to form a group to bid for a stake in Banco Espanol 
de Crafito SA, known as Banesto. 

• Argentina Corporation Bancaria de Espana SA, which is 50.1 percent 
state-owned, will only bid for a stake in Banesto if it oontibutes to the 
troubled bank's profitability, the chairman of Argentaria said. 

• Madrid, thcooly major stock market trading in Europe on Monday, saw 

share prices tumble about 3 3 percent as investors sold amid concern 
about plunging U.S. equities. afx. Reuters, a fp 

Foreign Orders Expected 
To Boost German Output 


I ROMANIA 

(Telefonica 

Romania CeBular service 


UNTTEO STATES 

Infonet Data network 


Source: TeteUnca de EspaHe 


dieted “wonderful opportunities” 
in Latin America. 

Telefonica's fust plunge c ame 
in 1 9 90 with the purchase of near- 
ly 20 percent of Telefdnica de 
Argentina, as well as manage- 
ment control, for $415.7 million. 

“It looked like a total disaster.” 
Mr. San Uliana recalled. Some em- 
ployees were rerouting company 




The New Ywk Time* 


ImM and pocketing the charges. 

Some residents shared phones 
by stringing their own wires from 
window to window. Lack of 
maintenance left many networks 
inoperable. Equipment, bought 
years earlier, sal in warehouses 
unopened. 

“Despite the chaos, we realized 
this was something we could han- 
dle;” Mr. Ros sard. 


Reuters 

MUNICH — West German in- 
dustrial production will rise by 2 
percent this year, boosted chiefly 
by foreign demand, the Ifo eco- 
nomic research institute predicted 
Monday. Industrial output fell by 8 
percent last year. 

In its latest economic report, the 
institute said that new orders were 
up an inflation-adjusted 2 percent 
in the period from November 1993 
to January 1994, compared with 
the previous year.' That was due 
largely to a 725 percent increase in 
orders from abroad. 

Ifo, one of Germany’s six leading 
economic think-tanks, said cost- 
cutting measures and moderate 
wage settlements had improved the 
competitiveness of West German 
industrial products. 


The mark’s weakness against the 
dollar and yen had also helped. 

Ifo expects vehicle output to rise 
by 5 percent this year, benefiting 
from foreign demand, after produc- 
tion shrank by 20 percent last year. 

In the electronics sector, produc- 
tion is expected to rise from 2 per- 
cent to 3 percent and in the metal- 
working sector by 1 percent. 
Output dropped by 625 percent and 
by 12 percent, respectively, in those 
sectors last year. 

Output in the chemical sector is 
expected to rise by 3 percent this 
year after a drop of 2 percent last 
year. Ifo said in the report. 

But the textile industry is eject- 
ed to experience further falls in 
production this year, Ifo said. 



1993 results in line with preliminary estimates 
A Clear Strategy, Strengthened Financial Structure* 
and Tight Management to Boost Profitability 


Ac its meeting on March 23, 1994, the Board of 
Directors of Banque Nationale de Paris, led by its 
Chairman, Michel Pdbereau, approved the 1993 
consolidated and parent company financial statements of 
the BNP Group. 

Results were consistent with preliminary estimates 
announced at the Shareholders’ Meeting on December 14, 
1993, and were affected by the cough economic climate in 
continental Europe and especially in France, BNP’s main 
market. Increased allocations to provisions, due particularly 
to bankruptcies or difficulties encountered by small and 
medium-seed companies in France, were responsible for an 
appreciable decline in nec income despite progress 
achieved by the Group in terms of both banking income 
and net operating income. 

Net operating income up 8.5% 

Banking income rose 4-9% to FRF 41.675 million. 
The increase -all the more remarkable as net interest 
income in France stagnated as a result of slackening 
demand for credit and narrower interest margins- was 
achieved largely thanks to the growth in service activities 
and to improved performances in capital market operations 
in Fiance and worldwide. Fee income rose, accounting for 
30.4% of banking income, up from 28.3% in 1992. 
Operating expense and depreciation rose in line with 
budget targets in France and abroad. Net operating income 
advanced 8.5% to FRF 12,457 million. 

Net income attributable to BNP Group 
of FRF 1,018 million, down 53% 
from 1992 due to sizable increase 
in allocations to provisions 

The BNP Group increased its net allocations to 
provisions by 43.8%. The sire of the increase reflects higher 
allowances for specific risks in 1993, as well as a substantial 
recovery from the provisions for country risk in 1992. 
Allowances for specific risks rose 16.7% to FRF 10,632 
million. The sharp increase in allocations to provisions in 
France, caused by growth in credit risks on loans to middle- 
market companies, was partly offset by a decline in the 
international network. The net addition to die country risk 
allowance was held to FRF 176 million in 1993, in 
contrast to a recovery of FRF 1,590 million in 1992; this 
last evolution had an adverse impact on consolidated net 
income. 

After nonrecurring items, earnings of affiliates carried 
under the equity method (which were higher than in 1992} 
and income taxes, net income attributable to the BNP 
Group amounted ro FRF 1,018 million, down 53.0% from 
1992. 


Improved financial structure 

BNP considerably strengthened its financial structure 
in 1993 in conjunction with its privatization. The exercise 
of virtually all share warrants issued in 1990 and October 
] 993 for both common and nonvoting shares gave BNP 
an additional FRF 103 billion of capital. Moreover, BNP 
created a reserve for general banking risks to which it 
added FRF 10.8 billion to cover certain risks, particularly 
those arising from the expecred imbalance between BNP’s 
active and retired staff members. 

The BNP Group improved its solvency ratio 
significandy. It stood at 9.5% at year-end 1993, compared 
with 8.7% at the end of 1992. The Tier 1 capital ratio 
reached 5.6%, up from 5.0% in 1992 (as compared with 
regulatory ratios of respectively 8 % and 4%}. 

Growth strategy based on increasing 
profitability 

Above all, 1993 was the year of privatization. This 
operation, which was as much a technical as a popular 
success, and put BNP on an equal footing with its large 
international competitors. BNP's goal is to ensure its 
development through a recovery in its profitability. This is 
a realistic goal, considering the scope for business 
expansion afforded by BNP’s capital ratios. BNP will be 
focusing its strategy on its two core businesses, retail 
banking in France and international banking for large 
corporate clients. To do so, the Bank will be relying on 
two solid allies : Union des Assurances de Paris (UAP) in 
France and Dresdner Bank. A policy of tight but 
motivating management has already been implemented to 
stimulate increased profitability, which stands to be further 
boosted by the gradual economic recovery. 

Gross dividend of FRF 4-50 per share 

(including tax credit) 

The Board of Directors will recommend that the 
May 26, 1994 Shareholders’ Meeting approve a net 
dividend of FRF 3.00 per common and nonvoring share, 
representing a gross dividend per share of FRF 4.50, 
including the tax credit. Total dividend payout would be 
FRF 552 million, compared with FRF 530.5 million for 
1992. Shareholders will be offered the choice between a 
cash dividend or a stock dividend, from the 1st of July, to 
the 25th of July 1994- Starring August 8th, 1994 rhe 
dividend will be paid in cash only, pending authorization 
by the Stockholders’ Meeting. 




























I fi*¥s S I fi | C eS I. I TZOOOOOOO o 0 oonnTi™mmmmmmmmnnnn5r=rm»5^m5H»«on»?H**^pn»5!ff**won«B»5$:oromnB!tf^»MOTiTizzzzzza«««So^ 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 1994 


NASDAQ 


►fan Low one* 


Oiv yw PE ions Hiflfi Lowunestcn'oe 


UMontn 

High LOW Slock 


as 

Ov HOPE lOfc 


non Low Latest Cn ee 


iJMflrth 
mon low sine* 


SB 

Yis PE 533s 


W uses’ P'S* 


i7.-«tsn 
won Lo* Sac* 


Hrsti LowLniestCh'ae 


lZAsonm 
High Low SWCR 


Monday's Piles* 

NASDAQ prices as of 4 pjn. New York time. 
This list compiled by the AP. consists of the 1 ,000 
most traded securities in terms of dollar value. It is 
updated twice a year. 


UMcntn 

hfiflh Low Stock 


Dtv YW PE IPOs Hton Low Latest OYoc 


2TA12 ABC Ran _ _ to 

30, IS Sr Bid il 734 

»V* 10% ACC Co .120 ft 13 1488 
24 JbACSEni _ _ 27 

46b 22Vi ACX Te _ 32 107 

44 ltoASi ~ S 4055 

ir ■* IlhABOn _ 1/31 

2W HtAESOji ill u » A 
444* 14 AGCO a* .1 II 1293 

s%ft£Hur '* “ -39S 
ft’SWSg 1 " = ?« 

33 124* AST I " S79B 

3?J2lS**^r* = ttH 

I r« T ? SST" = B^S 

15% a MocUb Aft u T 409 


13b 104* 174* -b 

3 4* 18'A 1BH — W 
26W 26b — % 
•a zi 2i*% — *a 
I6b 16 164% —A* 

S’ 4 SSS&IT* 

i2%dTTw in* — % 


- 17 7326 

- - 2184 
.16 J 20 277 


37 16WMobsS& JO .8 21 9616 


12% ft AOVPTO _ _ 1659 

1 1 'A dbAOvTss _ .. 1033 

464* 24MpAdvantD s JO J 16 607 

38%20%AdvantBs J4 A 15 1877 

15 7*% AoncvR __ 17 632 


16b 7bAaoum 
14V* 3V% AirMetn 
59b38%Akzo 
21Va 14UAKmtec 


I BY. t'AAiafas 
34% 13% Aldus 
28 V. 23 AtexBM 
19b 6V*Alfe&K 
3b lVaAIIASem 
14 7'« AJanPh 

16 7%AbiSemi 

24%llbAJlda 


_ „ 840 
_ .. 1162 
Iftfe 3ft 17 592 

• ,oe i £ 'ffi 

- -SI 

_. 17 2199 
- - 1195 


35V* 34V* 35 — % 

461* 451* 45V*— IV* 
23 WO 22V. 23 — % 

191* 17V* 19 — V* 

n% 7V. 71* _ 

21 W 20V* 20!* — V* 
24 V. 22V* 34 - W 

15V* 14W 15 — V* 

22V) 211* 22 —II* 

I1W 10 109% — W 

BV* ft 8% —Vi 
18V* 17 181* .- 

13 dUW 13 _ 

34V. 33% 331* — % 
24W 22W 231. —I* 
91* 8V* 9W —V* 

7% 7V* 7b —V* 

31 >6 30V. 301* — 1 
291* 28 V% 28V* —W 
12V* I IV* 13'* — V* 
12V* 121* 13V* —V* 
I3W 11V* 13 *W 
5b 5 5 —W 


16 15V* 15V* — IV* 

20 19V* 19V* — % 

15 14 14V* —V* 

26V* 35V* 251* —V. 
35 241* 24V* —V* 

13b 13 13 —1 

3V* 2’V,. W* 


sepm 

24U 8 W Atonal 
35V,17%AtorwB» 
3BW 14V* Altera 


_ 13 370 

* “ ii « 

_ _ 284 
_ _ 544 

_ 32 3091 


24Vi 5. ABron s _ U 816 

92 lTbAmerOn ftle - 126 2732 


30b 22W ABnkr 


M 3.1 8 |43 


33 II WAColaldS J4 IS IB 212 

30 1 * l3V*Amprflts - 33 _609 

34b25WAGrecf S JO 1.9 17 2680 


74% 11 AHHncDS 
23b 141* AMS 
17V* AWAMedE 
22 IB AmMbSar 
30V) 12WAPVVTCVS 
23V* 16 AmResid 
39W19 AmSupr 
27 IB AmTaie 
141* 7% A Travel 
16V* 9 AmcrOr. 
26V* ItlAmUd 
52 31 Amoen 
IS 5 Amrions 


_ 20 727 
_ 19 333 
- 17 970 
— 287 
_ 4711572 
_ 7 309 

Z — 391 
_ _ 377 
_ B 852 
_ _ 259 

**• >f iSSSf 

23 261B 


S V* 16% AiYItcCp s .08 J 22 3314 
'/illVjAnctiBcp _ 6 798 


3V* 2’Vi, J%, -'b 
BV* 8W 8% — W 
13'A 11V* 13 

13 12'* 121* —W 

24 33 'A 23 V* — b 

IBP. 18V) 18V* — V* 
12 111* 17 - 

20V* 19% 20 — 1% 
32 Vi 31 32% -% 

I3W 12 12b— 1 

S9V* 66b 67 —1 
22V. d 21b 21**— I % 
13W 13 13'* ... 

19'* 181* 19 V> —1« 
26 'ft 26 76 — b 

14 13W 13b — b 
19b 19b 19V* — b 

12% 11b in*— lb 

19 18% IBS* •'* 

25b 23b 24b — b 
16b 16 16V* —14 

34b 32b 34 —b 
23% 22 22 —lb 

11% rib Mb — b 
14 13b 14 — b 

20b 19b 30b — b 
Mb 34b 37b —V* 
9b BV* 9% —V* 


17b lZHAncnGm 
34b 12 Andrews 
71 W 13 Andros 
30 V* 16b Artec 
59 b 22 ApPtoC 
27V6 libAalsous 


_ „ Ml 

_ 29 3356 

„ 10 352 

_ 1115 

M I A ..14026 

A .1 a 1766 


25 BWAptebees .04 J 48 3j'0 


17 I3WAodDatI 
33 Bb Apdlnov % 

32 IBW ApWMt 5 
21% 15b ArtKir 
23b 12b ArtXirHI 
19 9b ArcKCm 


_ ... 1971 
M 48 609 
_ 3011342 
J4 1J 13 591 
_ 23 111 

r " 6i 


35b 29 AraoGa IJM 3 A 


36 Vi 17b Amosv 


15b BbArvBesi JW J 14 756 
21b 15 Armor M 3J 18 951 


24% SbAnsB 
46 16 ASBOTI 
34b17 1 AAsdCmA 
33b 16 AsaCmB 
20b 9?*A3ecs 
31V. 27 b Aston dF 


.40 II 17 615 
_ 36 6619 

- 28 2813 

_ 613 45 

— 346 4 

„ 16 502 
_. .. 1974 


39 25b AHSaAr s J2 1.1 22 


50V* 161* Almtri 
27b 18 AuBon 
9v,, 3V* AuraSy 


Wi, jtinuTDiy 

15b BbAusoex 
11b37 Autoak 
34'4 71 b Aulalnd 
29 Vi 10 Ault* of s 
28 16 AviOTch 


_ 79 3870 
_ 34 1341 
_ _ 6095 
.. 16 908 
JB ft 23x5657 

= S^ 

_ 65 879 


12b 12b 12b —Vi 
15b 14 16 —lb 

33b 30b 33'A-l 
18'A 17b IBb 
19U IBb 19b — b 
33 V. 31b 33b „ 

S 21b 23 -1 

22% 20V* 21b — % 
16 V* 14V* 16 —'A 

21 23b 24b— 2b 

46b 42% 45 - % 

16V: 16 I6'A —V* 
19 18% 19 — b 

14b I4'A 14% — b 
29V* 29 29 — W 

74b 27% 23 'A— lb 
13 12b 12b —V. 

If 1SW IS'* — 1 
2D'-a 19b I9%— TV* 
19% 1B% IBb — b 
32V. 29b 30b— 3b 
24% 23% 24b _ 

24W 24Vi 24b —Vi 
17b 17% 17b — % 
27>»d27b 27'*— 1 
3IW 79V* 29b— lb 
43% 41% 43% -% 
20b 18b 20b -b 
8% r-J* TV* „ 

6% d 51. 6b - 
S8V. S5V| 57% — % 
29 28 28 —7 

19 17b 18% — 1% 

2416 23 24b -1 



18'.* 7’iFmlCm 
39%2ibFoslona 

ia% laiiFMeiMr 
59 45 RttnT 


iav. a FjpoieA 
29 b S7«FifeiNBt 
12*> AV.FilSsmt 
56b 42. Flrsier 


S 'A39bPAIOBk 
V. 1 7 Vi Fst Alert 
34% S7 PtATn 
23%I5V*FColBn 


- 735 

.04 .1 47 4876 

,J * ? ? l 

... 35 3127 
. _ 1116 
1J4 is II 71 
1J0 19 10 1028 


91* 9% 9b — b 

31% 29b 29b— 3b 
17*. Ill* 16% —V* 


47% 46V* 46b— lb 
94* 9b 9b —V. 
25V< 23b 25 - b 

9". 9 9 -b 

44% 44 44 — b 

31 30V. sw* -V, 




73 17 Fkilr 

20b 13b Foamex 
7% SbFdUoB 
7b S'nFOLloA 
38' *31 For Am 
6 3%ForestO 
37 18 FarfnB 


22V. 7%Fass6 
25 7'.4D5oft 


11% S'AFrornTc 
32%19bFrshOiC 
32Vi 20% Frit* 

42%3l%FulrHB 
20% 7**Funcp 
15V; J'.FufurHIS 


20% lObGMIS 
21V* lft GPFnd 
41V* 12V.-GTI 

22 S', i Golev 
4iv. 24 b Gamer 
16b 13 Gosomcs 

23 MbGaleFA 

24b l6bGoto"-;«j 
17b SbGatwvFn 

36bl7'-.GnCrHlr 
37' - j 1 IbGnNutr s 
77 ir .GeneTnr 
49b28 l *fienetinsi 
lib iS'AGensia 
35'.* 14b Gentex s 
5b I’.* Genus 


41 1 * 2SY.Gcn=rm 
17% 4-:iGeoTk 


23b l7>iGtKnG 
29V. 19Y jGidLow S 
19 9%G4eod 
5Sb llbGtenoyr s 
12% BbGIDVilaa 
20% B GoodGy 
24 11 GdyFam 


uj iijr 

J4 7.9 7 1313 

M 2ft 19 275 

1.00 4 3 7 785 

JH 2/4 10 540 

TO !3 I 1052 

1.18 4.4 II 233 

_. _ IBM 

- - 287 

1A4 18 11 339 

“ sl >88 

JWe J 826 
.. - 1777 

.09 1.5 588 1255 

.09 1.6 550 4177 

1418 15 10 47 

... _ B48 

* it Ji? 

.. 10 401 

.. ... 259 

= 3 2 

J6 1ft 22 73a 

_. .. 285 

- 38 1616 

G-H 

- 23 503 

_ _ MW 

_ 9 149 

_ 15 358 

- 44 2537 

- 659 

_. 17 1675 

... 14 4ma 

- 12 179* 

-. 19 37 

_. 40 4947 

- -. 431 

., .. 463 

_ .. 2984 

... 39 2079 

- 1173 
10 3684 

_ _ JSVO 

M J 12 180 


31 30 V, 30% — % 

iav.flir.4 17% — V* 
29b 28b 28% — % 


21b 209.21% -’A 
MUdZa'.’i 23V* — % 


27% 22% 22% — b 
16% 15% 16 -% 

26b 76 V. 26V. -% 
H ID 10% — b 
14% 14>A 14% — b 
27b 27'* — b 

M 37% 37t i — % 
70% 19b 20% — % 
71b 21 71 — >-i 

13 b a 12% 12b — i v. 

6% 5V* St. — 

5b 5% S'/i —1* 
aibdsob 31% — b 
_3b 3b 3V„ _ 

30b 30% 30% — b 
19 W 17b 19W _ 

7% d 6% 7% — b 
9b 8b Bb — b 
Mb 25b 26 W —'A 
2? Vi 29V. — b 

37 35 36V, -V. 

14b 13b 14V, — 

H 10 II 


26b 22 QouIdP 
17b T-.AGruHPav 
52 20%GrcSjasn 
26'* 15%GmlcC 
15% 14 V, GrtFnd 
14V* U'-iGILkeAv 
22’i ISbGrontId 
4b 2%Grasmn 
15V. 12bGrvPtwi 
19%^rbGuostS 


M> 2.0 13 1529 
.17 .5 W 923 

_ ... 649 

... - 1396 

497 

._ 27 2CB0 

18 217 
ftO 3ft 20 B89 
_ _ 256 

jo !9 

= T . W 8 

Me 3 16 401 

_ _ B03 

_ 37 

_ 74 *45 

... _ 1787 

_ 65 2155 


12b II Vi Ub — % 
tav.dUVi \7b — % 

12% 012 12% —v* 

18% 17 V* 17 b— lb 
33b 32 33b — b 

13% d 12b 15b— j 

lib & 

%- ??% 

42b 41% 42 —'A 

15V,dl4% 15b — W 
23 V, 21 22 : , - 

4b 3b 4b — b 

P ?3i: ?S» 

K? 56% 36' -—l. 


20 — b 

Sb^ 

24'. — % 

13% 

J3 — *'i 
15 ^4 — Va 

S-5 


io% fob 

57 56b 

5l 20b 


?sa=s; 


76% abHSOS 
39 18V.HSRSC 
40% 15"jHcggar 
33v, 13 HamitnBc 
IB’-. 13>*HdTPG0 
26% 271* Harvl pt 
77 12 HIT MS VS 

2H'i lO’AHItOnp 
25b 12*«HearfTc 
36>i23>.Hrt1ndE 
141* BbHchBA 
201,13 HetonTr 
31 BbHcrdHe 
12 6'* Km an 

17% 9% HtMinaer 
32 ] '. IP'.HIvwdCa 
76’: 7 H allvv.de 
36 IS HWrPV i 
18% ’HHcrerM 
39 21b Hamode 
Mb 13%HomeTB S 
34 2l',Honlnd 
24% f'.Hombk 
15% lO' .HuaotEn 
37b 14 HumGen 
25b 17b HUM J8 
42% 16 Hun Ico 
27% ZObHuMBn 
41 19 HulChT 


30 

.16 1.2 23 

_ 9 

.72 3.1 Id 

.l?e 12 23 

40 _ - 

-. 538 
- 54 : 

_ 45 ■ 
-. 33 
._ >8 
62 

At 1.3 N 

15 ' 


21 20b 

36V, 34b 
10 9>i 

17 IS 1 /; 

16 V, IS'.j 
23%d2lb 

2 24 8 'C 
u%d8% 

^ r 

4% 3V. 

15 14% 

ISb 15 

25% av 
21b 2DV* 
34 32% 

20’* 19% 

17 16% 

36% 76'. i 

23 21% 

Mb 19b 
16b 1SV* 
34 33% 

13b 13b 
IS 14% 

24 22% 
71* 7b 
11V. II 

n-idiob 

24 zn-i 

18 16b 

18 16 
36 34b 

U'/Idl2 
33 32% 

14% 131* 
12% 12 
16% 15% 

27 21b 

25’, 23 
23b 22b 
31 28% 


3% 

10'4 — % 

asb-ib 

10 

16% 

15b — % 
22 % — > 
8'.* — b 
15% — 3 
21b -b 
131* — V, 
11%— I 
20 —I, 

4 ’/■ —1* 
14% — % 
15b — % 

74b — 2 b 
«2b— 1% 
25 1 . -% 
M'i — % 
33’*— I 
19*1—1 
17 -% 

24b — '* 
22 — J * 
20% - b 
16% — Yj 
33% — % 
13% — b 
Ub - b 
33% - 

7b — % 

10b — V; 
32%— lb 
17%— 1% 
17b -1 
35 b — b 
ll»b-li 
32% — b 
14 — % 

12% — V. 

16 — b 

21b — b 
2311 — I: 
22% — % 
30b — % 


8b 2-..LTX 
39%I7bLomR5 5 _ 

47’i30 USKitr* AO 
23bi 8b Lemce_ M 
30 Id LdmkGWl 
27% 13 Lononrs 

25V, 12bLorwJstr 
IBb 2bLOSmiTC 
MVil2%Lrti"»s 
2ibl3%LwvrTs .12 
2i%i4Vji_eadrFn 
70% 14 LmoCo 
18% 9 Lecwers 

40%ISV.-Leoenr 

25'. 17 LnvWOnS 
32 15 LiUMedA _ 

98b 62 LfeVldc at 6.00 

30 10’-: Lie USA 

27 IS'.iL'Hvins AO 
121 bBQ'-iLInBrd 
7S’'i 1 1 b Linccre s 
20% 12% Linens J7 
491i22'.iLmecrTc .24 

9% 5'iLiBOSm 
11% 4'.jLOJOCk 
17b 12 LOOaSn' 

27b 16b Laewen y .06 
MW 175il_n^Stk 

25 ’ 9 ,; Jl^iYE 
86% 23’-; Lotus 
6"* 5% MHMew ft3e 
2U* lib MB Cam 
29'i21%rAC1l ,10 

57b 23V; MFS Cm 
B'i SbMKGoifl 
28% 18% MS Carr 
13’. 3%MTCEI 

21 IS’.Maeramd 

19% a Moose 
18 Vi 5 MasPnr 

4i%29’*A«wmP 
70’%15’AIV.qBGo .76 

14 U'lMainSlCB 
27% 21 Mob infs 
34 V: 7%/Aarcam 

10 ariMaron 
77% 11 MsrhrarH 
30’-: 7’iMorXCTI 
aibZDirArTyvns .96 
25 ' : 9 AAarscm 

r» IBbMorsms J6 
23V*157aMcsland USe 
n B MctrxSv 
151* 7-:MaxcrHJt 
55b 24b Maxim 
8b 4bMaxtor 
57% 35 McCaw „ 
26b 20 MCCor M 
38% 14’i.Vledoiih 
16*. c..Medcr 
46% B%MedVin 
16b 5'AMedCm0 „ 
34bl7%rAed3ti AB 

22 SbMedicus 

23 11";M«i5tat 
19V. 9bA5esa»irTZ 
23% IO'-, A/Utoatest 
MbllbMen'.Vrs 
17** V Mentor 
17V* T’iMertGr 

23% IB MrcBKs M 

24b 9 Mercer m 

39' ,36bMer=Sns J C 
23 IS Mercmi _ 

34b 3fcb f drenBc -32. 

22% fJidtewei 
32% IB Mer^Co .12 

34 15'-.diVescAr 
HU, S'. : Memerjt 
1 TV* 10V: iVlelflCA £4 

34 6'iAtetrcm 

25V. 13' -Metroccn 
44b 75'iMicnStr „ 
6S’'.-51%Mie»:41 2-K 

56 if’.iMta-War 
32% 8-iVJcrAas 

47 r.MiCTCfSJS 

n* 1 ‘•it Acre 

lib 4bfJUcrBfx 
S’*. 41*MicrcP 
39'.; 131 .Micros 

93 7tA*M.CSttS 

11 AV-jMiCTTMI 
34’*25 MidGCI 
45 a%MidAt1S 
ZS 1 *18bMiO> rn 
33% I7';IWdlCp 

35 22bMHlrHr S3 
26% HPiftAiicmlfl 
28% 14 MdekSr 

29 1 5”i MSITel 

31 Y, l9%.1VKtnes M 
36V; IB Monsivks 
3B-J 28’, Molars £4 
2d 3 , 26V: MctocA J4 

31 10 McOerfA 


_ 0*2 
_ 2d 2124 
1,4 19 1250 
AS » 148 
_ 25 2517 
._ ... 1841 
. 20 HU 

_ 43 1926 

- 13 1795 

.* 3 T33 

_ _ 1380 

- V 1390 

_ 19 631 
„ Id 5992 
_ 58 1913 
... . 4796 

8.1 . . 2 
_ M 1536 
«A 23 J0« 

.. 20 SU 
3J 16 519 
A 32 29E3 
_. _ 3M9 

- _ 4234 
_ - 254 
_ 31 W 
.. 45 7936 
_ 19 665 
_ 24 566 

- 54159CC 

J 22 1228 
_ 17 141 
A 2044672 
„ _ 2569 
_ . 29S 

- 31 519 
_ _ 2231 

- _ 4fi2 
_ _ 71* 
_ -13211 
_ 15 B74 

A0 12 9T9 

_ 292 

_. _ 495 
_. 43 867 
_ 15 <23 
.. 40 2S24 
. 34 23 

35 12 131 
_. 68 2S> 
2J II SS2 
J 15 1745 

- 33 129 

-644 i;c: 

_ 29 893 

- - 4116 

_ _ 9322 
2 A 16 208 
_ 40 3159 
_ 2d 317 
7 9774 
_ 38 229 
2J 14 541 
.. 31 184 

_ 31 1339 
_ _ 3737 

- 15 4*9 

- 43 413 

- 8 S5C 

. - 6775 

17 ID I £32 
_ 810723 

16 0 675 

- 131 43 

4J 10 

. IS 1654 
J 15 772 
_ 39 549 

- 160 2393 
A 23 457 

” “ ^ 
_ .. 279 
.. 26 1350 
14 38 1965 

- 34 1752 
_ 20 IBS 

I _ TO 
_ _ 9S4 

- 1427 
_ 2S 249 

- 2521905 
_ - 656 
_ 13 723 
._ 32 4746 
_ 15 178 
_ Ti 3151 

1.9 18 2597 
_ _ 682 
_ 17 772 
_ £8 43SC 
lft 18 127 
_ 13 582 
.1 25 1526 
.1 38 1697 
_ _ 3733 


a?t 2?% e?. r *'jr' 

v?b tf/jp.-i; 

i' 4 IT 2^:? 

14% ;a% «;*— •_ 
19% lS'i-SJi— 
IP* 14 3 * 14%— 1% 
12% -1% ir: - 

25% 23 -s if.' T* 

21 IB Is.*': 

K 1? 

If-.. i3% i?:* -% 

.fciB’iS-:-*-. 


61b 46' JPCCOT 1 
Mb 9»iPW3"J!* 
57* i SS^s PpelfCA 
KAilTbPOOICB 
34'.: 13"»PWingS 
22-. s’iPeurTai 
33 , 17 PaaoJotm 
7* C'.PBroDan 
44b 22' iFnrmTcn 
24% if'.Porcpice 


23% W' .PartHU 
36% 15-% PatCnil 


n% rc’i rb— V< 

16 , ITT 16 * — 

42- 4C % 43%— -i 


5% 6 S — % 

e i ■ b “■ - 

24% 23% S%^' 

M’I “?■* ‘5'I— lb 

9: , d 9‘ , 9»i — -3 
69 66 Ad S. 

6b ,6 ,d 

S3- ; 3% 


36'-;15-%PatDnll 
■a%73%P0YCti*Si 
Jl'-, 30’,Pentoir s 

12'. fiPwi^T 

42 U'.iPeeoOic 

;2’-j B'-iPoooHrt 

13 J , SbPeooTd* 

&-5?Sbg?S£ 

34" .20 Peroas 
iiPiiZ'APettiiAn 
?9=i 9%PfrtGeO 5 
36 23%RetsMart 
21 V, 13 PtirmMkt 
33', 19’ jPtinuRe 
Sib 9b Pntrin 
36' • 13% PtirCor 
33 : . 7%PnvCA*_ 
27% I3 , *Pliv? i CH B 
27' i U' i PtCTW 
43% lSbFVanGpa 


49b 47b 48b— 2b 
14b 13 V* MYi - % 
49 45b 47V» — % 

48 Va 46 47% —'n 

23% 20% 23% —V, 
7b 7 7% —Vi 

29 TfV* 38 — VA 

Bb a 6% 6b— 4 V> 
28 'A 36% 37% -b 

fcStt 19% — % 

36W 

S 35 1 A 35<A — b 
Vi 9% 9% — '* 
29b 28b 29Vi— t 

'K V "W 

as KKna 

22 'A ZVA 71 % — 1 
WAdW 1 * 12% — b 
18 16 16 —lb 

29'/. 25b 27b ^b 
Ub 14 14 — % 

20b 19b 30% —V* 


IS'.-J 4%SoecHd 


as 

0% no PE loos 
, .. 913 
_ -. 5377 


50 15 a t 


26b SbSpr eoc ia 
19V* 7v.SpHmn 
44'„ 71 >i SoortReC 

r* bb®" 

26bl2%SMMfc 

gS'i ISnt 


_ Id 316 

a \w 

„ - 702 

■ IB 1239 

-« « ii ’S 


gJ2iSbS^a6 la _ d ft Wg 

^ >3 of 


24% UWStatnCaa 


asirgsas 


28% S6 3 . 25-.X— Sw 
4% - 

33% 21% 27-t - 


s 

ib r\ SwJS 

=-I 

13% 12 3 ,. 12% -% 

w- t: 

‘s»* ‘I'i 'fv — % 

2Cb 19% 19 i — b 
M : 19b 7C -f* 
28' ■ 27'.i 2J;. — % 
II : 12 J2 r — * 
21 % K'i 21 im - b 
19 1”« 1 7" 1—7 


40%24'APiOnHiB 
2S% 12 PionSld 
41% U PlTencr 
39% 9'. :Ptot5tts 
i*=. riPoTe 
29V. 12% Players 
69% 22 Pwrjoft 
36 W-, PrCrtr 


36 39 PrcREl 0 

35 '-i 70'.', PrcTR 3 
3* 19 PMnadn 

jr-r TbPracvt 
3A>* I6V: Proffin 
63% 32 %PtbScH 


- 75 4619 

Z 26 8189 

- 165 1013 

lftle 4ft fa 
32 lft 17 3494 


19V, 18% 18b — b 
30b 29% 30%— I % 
27b 25% Z7% *1* 

S 3 23% — 1 % 

bdl3 13 — b 

39V* 37b 39b -W 
33 SVa 32'A — % 
24 21b 23b *1 

17b 16 16%— lb 

11% 9b lay*— 1 

» % 11 11% — % 

W 19W 30% — % 
54 ssian-ia 
23% 21 22V»— 2% 

17 15% 16 — b 

30V* 28 28 —5b 

18 17b 17% — b 

33% 33 33 — V* 

28 26b Z7W — W 


24bi5 SieinMis 

%%£ 1^ « 

28% 19% StewSn s Ot 

23V.HV.Sdt 
19b TO'.nSrrrtS" 

21% 12 SlruCP 

35% 21 Strvwr 

42b 25 SummpF 
24b IBbSumKB ft4 
10% S StotrtWf .08 

38% 18 SumitTc 
M% 21 % SunMIc . 

27 9b Sun TVS ft4 
42b 28 SunGM 
4!%a»A3un0ljKS 
lib WuSunwT 5 
24b BWSupMoC 
40bl8%Sufifec 
27 15 SwftTs 

15% BbSyQStTc 


— _ 3320 

M J 23 336 

- 25 264 
47 1934 

74 ft 24 2902 

04 2 17x2617 

= 154 46 

._ 40 3023 
._ 27 1756 
£7* .2 £ 3150 
_ 53 380 


fQflft Low Lend or ae 

9 ” 8% 8'* —a" 

2*o 3% 3% 

»% 20’* 21 _|2 

12b 11% tlv-_|l 

39% aatAMbJb- 

5% JNk .Sb “ 

4 3"/u 3*v w 

S 

sss Sift 4 

37 36% S6 3 * -% 

vt&iir 


ii 1 


19b 19 19% _l7. 

is 17 irdLii* 


15 1L 

24 22b 23% 

43b 4ib43'*_ a (; 


-0 


Mb 21b22b=fj; 


21b 21% 21%_|i 
18b 17b 181* =2. 




^SaS5l|^ C 6 

17 WbSylvnLrn 
20% 109*5vm"tc 
42b lfbSvnOrts 
24b MWSvneor 
16W ■ Synenm 


_ 1251829 
ft 10 2198 
- 16 1015 
_ 193 3941 
_ 14 704 
_. 795 

_ - 2197 

= 2 $ m 

_ 52 9053 
_ _ 133 
_. ... 4129 
_ 1810180 
_ 119 1361 
_ - 2054 
_ 45 M49 
ft 17 831 


29 . TbPrctOg 
B’i 3%Prtneon 
12 SbProtSy 


- _ 1JW 

_ 33 601 

21 1243 

- _ 1699 
_ _ 1S7B 


1C% 1; 10 — 1 « 30’* T 

13 :r * is ■ — * I 25 a 

53’. 4 f), SC * _ 23V. 13' 


7% 6>. 7 Vi —a* 

4fs 48-s 4S% — .« 

21b ZC 3£'«— 1 •* 
32V: 31'; 32 -*— 1 
12% 12 12 . -% 
9’, SV. 9'.; — % 
16'. 15V, 16., 

*i 5 ft 51 ft 3* s — .'i* 

ip, IF, 10 — i 

15". W . !4»« — % 
13b 13 13% — % 

is't 17% 117, — y, 
29'* 27% 29 ■* -% 

13:. is ir* — y, 
15% Ub -,r. - 4 
ic.zdir.* 18 <i 

12 13 1C';— I’. 

»=4(j26:.. ri;,.- 
■A is*i ,S«— 1% 
?e% 27H2T-*— lb 
18 17 .* 17 .* — % 

25 23 25 

2C If'.* T9,; — I 
9:i 9 Vs 9*« — % 

16b 15b id — U 
70. s 79 1% 

18 :6b 17 —1 

4S% 39 29 —2 

60b sr. sw-Pi 

45 43'.; 43% —3 1 '; 

L=. 23b 25% - % 


12 S'AProtSy 
23b 12 PrvBkstt 
30'* TbPweTc 
25 a Pumioc 
23»'.T5bPunJaen 

S MbPuroPd 
W GViPyrwfT 
381* 16% Pyxis 5 

ff ^§^39 

43% 19' .Ourtcm 5 
38b 31 V* CKFood 


20V. 9%Ouantum 
40 1 .'; labOucntHtf 


_ 21 456 
-36 IJ 16 261 
_ _ 998 

.12 ft * S 
^ 4 J! VL& 

„ 37 6784 
- 31 4592 
_ 10 945 

JO lft U V4?7 


11% Tow 10% — % 
21 20% 21 _ 
47b 44b 47 -1 

22% 20b 21% —I* 

9’A 8% 9W -W 

M% 19W 20'A —Hi 
15b IS 15b — U 


- 34 1316 
T-U-V 


18b 17*A 18% =2. 
13% 12% 131* > 

39 36% 38% .C- 

?,% jrfcdft 

27^ 

ft l 

fftef* K5=!J 

3Zb 27'. 30%-a - 
36 35% 25 H. — ! ' 

10b 10 ID”, — % 
45% 43b 45 _ - 

15'A 14V* 15 — 

164* 14% 16 *% 

30W 19% 30 — ia- 

30 18b 19 —1% 

10W 9% 10 

43 41%42%— 1% 

15 13% 15 „3>' 

5% 5V, S’.'!, 


.c 1 

rfh 4 * 


10 Vi 9% 10 — % 

43 41% 42H— Hi 

15 13% 15 .S 

5% 5V, y.'u 

20% 10% 20% -IV* 


1BV* 1DWTBC 5 
30% I8I3TCA 
14% 11%TFC Ent 


- 17 413 
2.1 24 1744 
_ _ 1123 
1.0 <2 780 


33 14% TJ WHS J2 1.0 42 ™ 
29b IS’ATNT Pt S J7 1J 21 904 
12% 6bTPien _ - 


Cb 7% ft 1 * *% 
26 23% 35. —1> 


13% 6bTpi£n 
13b 9bTR Fnc 


36Wd34 34%— 1% 

13% 11% 12% — % 


13b 9bTRf 
»VA13%Too 
76 32V. Tck 


_ 63 5»1 34% 32'A 23b— 1% 
ft 15 1497 31%dI9% 20 —2 
- _ 8367 16% 15% 16% — W 


26% 14 TonjelT 
44’A21WTcti6qKi 


lSb1«*OuH«r 
6% SbOubW 
16% 9 Ouiksh/ 
16 7%OuinS9a 
31 IlbOuixle 


_ 36 382 

— - 167 
_ _ 540 

- 18 306 
3e J _ 481 
3 U 13 346 


13% 12% 13b - 

4% 4% 4% — % 


13% 12% 13b _ 

4b 4% 4% — % 
13b 13% 13% — b 
Ub 13% 14 — % 


44W21WTctll>ata 
31 ISbTecnol s 
63%31%TeCUB5 

§ W 30’.*TecUA S 

b 6% Teloo 
%17%TMCmA 
ista JbTrtaOJt 
25% 13 Teledto 


„ _. 1092 
_ » 563 
_ 23 1561 

- 46 95 

_ 23 2D58 

- 19 24S 
ftoa 1/4 18 124 
ftOa 1.7 13 3U 

.. — 989 


17% 12% 12*5 17 

21% 21b 21V* —i* 
12 11% 11% — b 

23% 22% 22b — % ‘ 
25V , 24 24b .Vi, 

7 d 6% 6% ” 

12 Mb 1? — K" 

17% 16 16 —1% . 

721* 71 W 71%— lft. 
241/4 23% 24’A _ 


38V* 34% J8W -2 _ , 
13b d 12V: 13b »b 




16% 15% 16b 


34% lBWTevdS 
63%19b3Cqm 
48b 18% 300 CO 


19 1 /, 12 TaaayM 
11 Vi 6%T WM 


_ -. 2650 
15 111 
I 39 4417 

„ _ 3780 

ftl .1 26 887 

_ 21 I960 

JOe ft 23 319 

- -19 2M 

— — ISO 

_ 29 IBM 

.28 42 12 1448 


2S'A 31 TracS^ _ 1117 

24% 7 Tmmeds ft3i J 39 230 


17% 10 Trip act 

B 11V* Tricord 

% SbTrlmed 
18 ll%THCJlltot 


_ 17 663 

- 20 1096 

- - 1293 

- 86 141 

- 384 
.15* 1J 16 1259 
£8 A 16 1712 

_ IS 22 
_ 34 22M 
_ _ 184 

- _ 1123 
_ _ 323 
_ 15 4022 

- 27 515 


2**3% *2* 

i? m% if'A =S;. 

20% 19b 20% 

11% 10H 11% —ii' 
15 14%. Ub— % 

54% 50% 53% —1 T 
15%dl«y> 14%— 1% . 
12% 12 12% — 2* 

ft 

a' /3 mi a" 

16b 16 16% -I* 

« «* a 6% _% 

T ftBSrf 

34% 33% 34b —I* 


13% 12% 17% — V, 
15 13% 14% —H 


48 B’AUnCOsFs AO 1ft 37 695 
38’/,21V*UWlntHW „ 178 

EftigH w 35 gft 

19% 9WUldVV5te . 11 1M2 

M 1 * 3 ? Um5©C _ 2 8 950 

IBb'ibVlSl 0 ^ = fl 6W6 

23b 11 VrfTACfl _ - 1227 

39%2S%VolyBcs .96 2.7 16 23$ 

15% 3W Vcdvb A _ _ 1890 

35 21 VOnJO _ _ 2355 

12% 9 VenedSW - .. J7T 

46 19WVentntx _ - 4394 


15 13% 14% —it' 

10% 9b «h=P 
16V. 15 16b _ 

16 d!5 15 —1 

9% dab Bb — % 

19b 19b 19% — v, 

17% 17% 17% 

11 % 10W 11b t'. 

8% B aw -J% - 

B B*B-rt 9 
??% aS*— 1% • 

41% 39% 40%— 1%r 
33 32 32 -1W 

25% 24% 25 — % ft i 

41% 38% 41% 

4, « Wl. - % 1 


34 30 33% 

57% 51% 9 —V* 

18% ?7W 17% — % 
39bd38% 38%— i% , 
7 d 6b 6b — »■ 
23% 22% 23 V* — % 
14% 13b 13b -ft*. 
Ub 13% 13% -% 

36 15% 35% — b 

7b 7 7V* — % 

29 28 28b — % 

9% 9 f _% . 

21 19V* 20 —IV* 

17% 16% 16b -b 

13% 12% 13% ~% 

26 24% 26 

16% 15% 16% — 

16 W 15 16V* *% 

26% 2< 26 -%.. 
46% 42 43 —31*- 

1VW 17% 18% /-% ■ 

5’A 4b 5% —’A . 

18V. 16% 17b —b . 

76% 75b 76%— 1% ' 


in itiilwr 


Monday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wail Street and do not reflect 
late trades eisewhera. Via The Associated Press 






7% 4%Cil Fin 
8b 7bClM 
9". VtCMICP 


231 5b 5% 5% — W 


13*. lu CVBFn 
IVi, V u OCR 
73 29**COMvsn 

3'V|, n/.,cnitonn 


- SI 516 .7% 7b 7% ■ % 

J2h2> ^ 10 j ft , 8 

= = W 9% lift 51b— 7% 5 


... _ 139 2'<i, 1'Vu, 2 


24'-. lfibComtyx m ft 13 34 » ' ii “ 22 -V* I 2 

























































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, -APRIL 5, 1994 


C7 I"* 

For the Economy 

r hi rx r* .. 


Economy is Drawing Market Focus Devaluation 


Conspilai by Ovr Staff Frm Dhpaidta 

.TOKYO Bank oF Japan 
branch managers across the coun- 
uy reported on Monday brighten- 
ing prospects for a long-awaited 
v economic recovery. 

■X The managers submitted reports 

■/. icia quarterly meeting of their peers 
that said business executives ap- 
peared to be gaining confidence 

"“We need to watch for develop- 
'i- meats to see if the latest signs of 
improvement will last and have 
:■ widespread effect,” the central 
■' bank’s governor, Yasushi Mieno, 
. said at the meeting. 

After three years of recession, “it 
might be time the economy natioa- 
■ j wide started moving off the bottom 
from the cyclical point of view," 
• sad the Osaka branch manager, 
- TatsuyaTamura. 

Japanese Seek 
iVeic Trade Talks 

The Associated Press 

■TOKYO — Japan hopes to re- 
v- svme trade talks with the United 
States this month and begin mend- 
gag relations, the chief government 
spokesman said Monday. 

• The spokesman, Masayoshi Take- 
mura, said the two countries were 
discussing the possibility of talks 
between Foreign Minister Tsutomu 
Hata and the UJS. trade representa- 
tive, Mickey Kamor. 


Bright spots are particularly evi- 
dent in Osaka and neighboring cit- 
ies in western Japan, where dec- 
lines giants such as Matsushita 
Electric Industrial Co. are based. 

Industrial production headed up 
in central Japan in the January' 
March period, and this was likely 
to continue through April-June, 

T atra him ICawase, branch manager 
for the central Nagoya region, said. 

Carmakers, such as Toyota Mo- 
tor Corp„ are increasing their ship- 
ments to the United States, he said. 

In Hokkaido, bousing construc- 
tion is booming and increased pub- 
lic-worts spending is supporting 
the regional economy, according to 
the Sapporo branch manager. Ya- 
suiada Sasaki. 

Consumer demand for washing 
machines, refrigerators, personal 
computers and facsmOe machines 
has emerged as households seek re- 
placements for old units and loosen 
their pursestrings as prices fall. 

Indeed, DKB Research Institute 
separately said Monday that it had 
raised its forecast for growth in 
Japan's gross domestic product to 1 
percent for the year to March 31, 
1995, because of strong consumer 
spending. 

But Mr. Tamura. the Osaka 
manager of the BOJ, added that he 
saw “some traps” that could stymie 
upward movements. 

For example, be said, the main 
engine for recent upbeat moves is 


' Both are scheduled to be in Mo- as increase in exports, which could 
tqcco in mid-April for a meeting of boost Japan’s current-account sur- 


the General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade. 


plus and bring about a higher yen. 

f Reuters. AFP) 


Bloomberg TV Aspires 
To International Reach 


By Steven Bmll 

International Herald Tribute 

\ TOKYO — In a move that 
will intensify competition in 
.business news broadcasting, 
Bloomberg LP will broaden its 
^upcoming 24-hour television ser- 
vice beyond the United States to 
• Europe later this year and subse- 
quently to Asia, its president and 
founder said Monday. 

The service will offer contin- 
uous updates of general and 
business news, ; and,be heavy on 
charts, graphs ’and talking 
heads. It will begin in limited 
form next month, expanding to 
24 hoars a day by June. But at 
the outset, viewers will be few. 

In North America, where die 
Bloomberg Direct wiB be dis- 
tributed via GM Hughes Elec- 
tronics' satellite- to- home 
broadcasting service, the neces- 
sary antennas and recovers, 
which will cost hundreds of dol- 
lars, will not be sold until Sep- 
tember. The service, however, 
will be available on a handful of 
cable systems. 

Michael R- Bloomberg, presi- 
dent. said that in Europe, 
Bloomberg was in “the final 
stage” of negotiations with three 
satellite operators and hopes to 
be on the air to a West European 

audience by September or Octo- 


ber. In Asia, he said, the compa- 
ny hopes to secure a transponder 
by the end of the year. 

The service, which will in- 
clude three audio channels, one 
carrying Bloomberg's 24-hour 
radio service, will add pressure 
on other broadcasters, such as 
Cable News Network, Dow 
Jones & Co. and Reuters Hold- 
ings PLC which arc aiming 
television programming at busi- 
ness viewers intemationally. 

,^We are not going to take 
American hews and force it down 
the throats of Japan and Asia the 
way CNN does. Mr. Bkxmbetg 
said, adding that Asian news win 
emanate from studios in Tokyo. 
Hong Kan& Sngtqxwe and Syd- 
ney, with studios in London, Par- 
is and Frankfurt providing Euro- 
pean news. 

Mr. Bloomberg clearly plans 
to run the service on a shoe- 
string budget. 

1 don't plan to invest an 
enormous amount of capital," he 
said, adding that he planned to 
hire only a handful ot additional 
employees. Most of the content 
will be culled from the Bloom- 
berg’s main service, consisting 
largely of text and graphic infor- 
mation. As much as possible, 
computers win be used to auto- 
mate video production. 


FL TRUST SWITZERLAND 

Soetete d’JnvesHssement 6 Capital Variable - SICAV 
14. Boulevard Emmanuel Servers 
L-2535 LUXEMBOURG 
R.C. Luxembourg - B-33M46 

Mrssicut* Ire Actionnairc* sont invitd? h partidper 3 VAgscmblde 
r^nrrale StatuUrirc qui se tiendra an aege social fc vendretb 15 avril 
IO 04 i 15.00 heurcs afin de doJibcrcr ear Ire pomte suivanta: 

nmff pg n». mtm D fi uM B mm staiu ia ke 

f . Rapports du Consdi d’Adroinistrstion ct du Rtfvwcur 

2 Approbation dec elate financier* tftablis au 3 1 dcccmbre 1993. 

£ D^chargc h donner aux Administrators el an Reriseor 
d‘ Enterprises. 

4. Nominations statutain*. 

5. Divers. .... j - . 

4 n 'ert rpqois pour Ics points a 1 ordre du joor dc 

rASmSST(Sn5n?e lurtoiaW Lea Seeisions seront pnsre k la 
actionnaires prints ou represent 
- » _ _ j„ui n ,1 n vote et tool actionnairc poirrra se 

F^ aq rror&cnler 0 par p^u ration k adreswr au siege redid dc la 
faire representer pa P urd Dcs procurations scront 

. . ■ , i-wmblcc. Ire propriclairre d'actiona au portcur 

pourctre adnns d lAfflejn '^ b cln _ , our8 francs a van l 

sont pries de d6 P?®J d | a Banque Ferricr LuHin (Luxemboui^ 
SSfi &S ..-MM Luxcmboni^. 

SA ” I4, LE CONSELL D' ADMINISTRATION 


uvE'iv Sie us 

wwPBiprrEDiN 


For Same day_ 




Reuters 

KUALA LUMPUR — Ma- 
laysia's stock market, sucked 
down recently by bearish over- 
seas bourses and panic selling by 
retail investors, is poised for a 
slow recovery, brokers and ana- 
lysts said Monday. 

They are pinning their opti- 
mistic outlook on the country's 

S economic fundamentals, 
a lion that the ruling Unit- 
ed Malay's National Organiza- 
tion will call a general election in 
the third quarter and strong cor- 
porate results in the current re- 
porting season. 

“At this juncture all the nega- 
tive news is already in the share 
prices," said William Chan, an 
analyst with Seagroati St Camp- 
bell “We fed that the downside 
risk of the market is gradually 
diminishing." 

That sentiment failed to show 
in share prices Monday, when 
the Kuala Lumpur Stock. Ex- 
change composite index fell 
31.61 points, to 92833. The in- 
dex has now lost 29 percent since 
setting a record high of 1,314.46 
points on Jan. 5. 

But the recent weakness has 
opened up buying opportunities 
for those looking at economic 
f undamentals, analysts said. Ma- 
laysia’s central bank has project- 
ed growth of 8.4 percent m gross 
domestic product in 1994, alter 
8.5 percent growth last year. If 
GDP growth tins year matches 
that expectation, it will be Ma- 
laysia’s seventh straight year of 
growth exceeding 8.0 percent 
“The play has turned from the 
situational and speculative 
counters to more fundamental 
factors,” said an institutional 
deafer with a commercial bank. 


“It isn’t like 1993, when we 
bought on rumors and specula- 
tion. We now want to see good 
strong corporate earnings before 
we recommend a buy.” 

Merrill Lynch & Co, which is 
forecasting a recovery led by blue- 
chip issues, has recommended se- 
lective buying in utilities, financ e, 
infrastructure and gaming stocks. 
It forecast average corporate 
earnings growth of 21 percent in 
1994 and 15 percent in 1995- 

“We think the upside potential 
may be realized rdativdy slowly 
as the euphoria of the 1993 bull 
run has all but died down and 
while many local retail players 
unwind their positions,'’ said 
Kwok-Kin Lai of Menilf Lynch. 

“While market wisdom is 
pointing to a general election to 
lift sentiment, we believe that the 
lcicker would more likely emerge 
from announcements of privati- 


zation and other projects,” Mr. 
Lai said. 

But some analysts said they 
thought the market still needed 
more of a downward correction 
before it could rebound. 

“Personally I don’t think the 
market is cheap now," a dealer 
said, referring to the market’s 
relatively high price/ earnings ra- 
tios. The ratio measures the price 
of a stock to the latest or project- 
ed earnings per share, so the 
higher the number, the more 
speculative the investment. The 
market is now trading at pro- 
spective average p/e ratios of 
around 22 times 1994 earnings 
and 20 times 1995 earnings. 

“One has to remember that the 
funds in Malaysia are not just 
competing with markets in 
Southeast Asia, but other devel- 
oping markets with single digit 
P/Es," he said. 


How tow is Low 

Kuah 

.1400 



•\ '.': ;4ari.'3 . * 7. 

Sdurce: Btoor&oor-' • “ 


Fet *.:•••• ' 


Mar. April; 


Imcnvuona) HciaM Tribune 


Cvnpded try Our Staff Front Dispatches 

JAKARTA — Finance Minister 
Mar'ie Muhammad said Monday 
that the government would not de- 
value Indonesia's currency despite 
the recent slump in oil prices. 

Oil and gas account for about 30 
percent of the country’s export 
earnings. 

Mr. Muhammad said after a 
meeting with President Suharto 
that the government has been ready 
with a number of alternatives in 
case of a continued slump in the oil 
market. 

“But we will not resort to drastic 
measures, including devaluation, in 
coping with financial difficulties as 
a result of the depressed oil mar- 
ket,” he added. 

The government devalued the ru- 
piah by 45 percent against ibe dol- 
lar following the oil price fall in 
1986, when oil and g as accounted 
for about 75 percent of the coun- 
try’s export income. 

Mr. Muhammad said the govern- 
ment may cut spending, especially 
routine expenditures, if necessary, 
but will continue its economic de- 
velopment plans. 

Mr. Muhammad said that in the! 
fiscal year ended in March, thedes 
pressed oD market caused the couth 
try’s first budget deficit in 25 years-! 
It amounted to 1.8 billion rupiahs 
($837 million). J 

The deficit has been covered by 
taking funds from development re- 
serves that Indonesia generated 
during the Gulf conflict. "We still 
have a development fund reserve of 
1.7 trillion rupiah," he said. 

The price of Indonesian o3 aver- 
aged $16.50 a band last year, be- 
low the projected figure of $18 
upon which the state budget was 
calculated. (Reuters, AP) 


Korean Air Wants a China Card to Play 


Reuters 

SEOUL — Burgeoning ties be- 
tween China and South Korea are 
expected to fill a vend in Korean 
Air Lines’ aviation map and pro- 
vide a bonus to its finances, accord- 
ing to the carrier’s president, Cbo 
Yang Ho. 

“It is vital for us to have the right 
to fly to and beyond Beijing to 
become competitive;” Mr. Cbo said 
in a recent interview. 

“European and U.S. camera al- 
ready have rights to fly beyond 
Beijing for their operations in 
Northeast Asia,” he said. “So it is ; 
very important for KAL to have 
SeouLBeijing-Europe routes and 
Bdjing-SeouI-U.S. routes." 

“This wfl] directly affect our in- 
ternational competitiveness and 
our company’s future bottom line*” 
he added. 

South Korea and China have 
agreed in principle to sign an avia- 
tion pact soon to launch regular air 
services but differences on terms 
prevented them from concluding it 
during President Kim Young Sam's 
viat to Beijing last week. 

“I understand die two countries 
are negotiating with an aim to con- 
dude the agreement within tins 
year,” said Mr. Cho, who accompa- 
nied Mr. Kim to China. 

Mr. Cbo said the Beijing routes 
were linked to a South Korean plan 
to make the country an aviation hub 
by the year 2000 , when a new airport 


for Seoul, near the port city of In- 
chon, is to become operational. 

The airport at Yongjong island, 
about two bouts drive from Seoul, 
is slated to be expanded in phases 
and cost 23 trillion won ($ 2.8 bil- 
lion) by 2020. Plans call for four 
runways at the airport, capable of 
handbag 240,000 /lights a year. 

“With the new airport open 24 
hours a day and capable of accom- 
moda ting superjumbo jets, it would 
be in a good position to emerge as a 
northeast Asian hub,” Mr. Cbo said. 

^Tokyo is saturated already. 
Beijing is still far away and Osaka’s 
new" airport has only one runway,” 
he added. 

The Korean Air lines president 
said the possibility of developing 
superjumbo aircraft, which would 
cany between 500 and 800 passen- 
gers, would downgrade smaller, 
crowded airports in the region to 
“feeder” airports. 

Mr. Cbo said closer China-South 


United States 
Mercers 
T jr AND 

Acquisitions 

RACE and ROSE 

ATTOUNCr* AND OOUNS&jOWS 
WASHINGTON D C 
,202, 7TSMM 
PARIS. FRANCE 
A A za 19.41 

LOS ANGELES 
1 3iOi 2T7-2&00 


Korea ties would bring other busi- 
nesses for Korean Air Lines, which 
now makes parts and components 
for Boeing Co„ Northrop Corp. 
and McDonnell Douglas Coro. 

During Mr. Kim’s visit to China 
last week, China and South Korea 
agreed to develop a 1 00 - seat com- 
mercial aircraft by the turn of the 
century with technological help 
from a third country. 

Mr. Cho said Korean Air. the 
Seoul government and two con- 
glomerates. Samsung and Daewoo, 


would be the South Korean part- 
ners in the project. 

“It is necessary to involve an 
established aircraft manufacturer 
to make the project commercially 
viable,” be said. “You may be able 
to develop the mid-sized aircraft 
but it is impossible to market the 
plane without the help of a major 
industry player.” 

The trade ministry has sail South 
Korea plans to invest $900 miflion to 
SI biDton to build a 100 -sea ter air- 
craft.' 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL FUND 

Sod 6(6 d'lnvestissement 6 Capital Variable 
Registered Office: 

L-1528 Luxembourg, 5, Boulevard de la Foire 
R.C. Luxembourg B 8833 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

At the Annual General Meeting held on March 29, 1994, 
it was derided to pay a dividend of USD 0,47 (fourty 
seven cents) per share on /or after April 08, 1 994 to sha- 
reholders of record on March 29, 1994 and to holders 
of bearer shares upon presentation of coupon nr 25. The 
ex-dividend date is March 30, 1994. 

Paying Agent: 

CHASE MANHATTAN BANK ( LUXEMBOURG ) SA. 
L-2338 Luxembourg. 5, rue PJaetis 


CURRENCY AM) CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 



\/ Competitive Prices 
^ Daily' Fax Service 

|TEL 071-931 9138 r FAX 071-931 7114 

SOVEREIGN (FOREX* LTD 

^ 24 HR FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


Q UVEDaiaFsomakxkoSIO/dwo 
European Q EOD Data for $ 5/Day Q 

Q 1 30+ Software Applications O 

PRICEBUSTER Cail Signal 


European 


Call Anytime On London 


44 + 71 231 3556 


LONDON & GLOBAL 
FOREIGN EXCHANGE PLC 

PREMIER SPECULATION SERVICE 
QUOTE UP TO lOO MILLION OSS 
Top floor. Comao House, 1 1 Boor Sfteoi, London WC2H 7AS 
U: (07IJ 8396161 to: (071J 839 2414 


— ■ —Attention Futures Traders—— 

US 929 OR ImESS nourm TURN 

• Pud Om Tou. FttS’WoxtDWiDK * SS,0M Stonrai acc«WT 
« Itecomrr roe Vouoax Tumo • root Qoon Stxea Oman 
■ Pus Mnc« MowcUl to4MlliwanreMHaMrnait«Tn^u4 

■moapboMbOlm too, vrbB.phoM nice 

rtmxcm. ru»sa Cmtsna u. Hannaz Bo«n, 23 s* Srzrmoa G*n», 
Damn 2 , Xhujo) Tel* 3 S 316 :WG 0 MF«C +353 IB 166123 


Duff Forecasts and Market Myths for 

The US collar will socr. celicUor. -vi',1 continue. QSld * most comx,a 
wont me. Japan s economy * stock maiKC-l will beweaK. You od 
r;OT read tncl In fu.'i'erMonev • ?ne iconoclastic investment fe!.e>r. 

cc ! xy-0 ^". 05 '*■ = ;c-p *> 'KJ9 tone ci on.y) -j:Cbc" Aj-a;yj_j .’C. 

7 S*o j* 5!'c<.’t Lontfcn.-A-tR7-2.LK Tci IcMon 
CO 71 in !:» 


Consistent profits in futures are possible! 

Learn how to speculate like a professional in 
international futures markets 

Call JbrJree info: 

Gerimg & Cie., 4. rue Pasteur. 7501 1 Paris. France 
Tel.: 33-1-43 86 01 12 - Fax: 33 - 1-43 86 01 43_^ 


The real-time information system 
preferred by Institutions and now 
available to traders at home. Unrivaled coverage at an unrivaled 
price. Futures * Options • FX ■ Energy • Commodities • Metals • 
News • Full Charting & Technical Analysis from our Worldwide 
coverage - available via Satellite t h roug h Europe. 

CdS fvhtrcSource Telj +44 71 -8 67 8867 Fcce +44 71-867 1364 


•FOREX 'METALS -BONDS -SOFTS 

Objeriive anclysis for professional investors 

( 44 ) 962 879764 

Fiennes House. 32 Southqate Street. Winchester. 
Hants S023 9EH UK Fax (44) 424 774067 


I— ir T- FINTECH ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD. sms 
14 High Street, Windsor, England SL4 lLD 

PROFESSIONAL CURRENCY MANAGERS 
Highly Rated Computer Based Technical Service 

* Currency Fund Management {S.FA Members] 

+ Corporate AiMsory Services * 1 4 Year Audited Trocx Recaro 

"nrrMf nr- - ■“r ™ ** \ U) 753 8332 ff 



THE DAILY SPECULATOR 
THE COMMODITY TRADER 
THE WEEKLY INVESTOR 


7Jnefo specie, proven mar- 
kBtstratBgies.aBfvsreddafy, 
torn themgrhsb open 
Please caB for a fflfiE copy 
of the market tetter of you 
chaos. 



FINANCIAL TRADERS, LTD. 

280 Oser Avenue 
HaLppauge, NY 11788 

1-800-284-9100 


For further details on bow to place your listing contact PATRICK FALCONER in London 
TeL (44) 71 836 4 8 02 -Fa x: ( 44) 71 240 2254 


Page 17 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


BOJ ( 

:.hiel 

fs« 

IP4 

3k 


P ^1 



Indonesia [C 



r V/ 

Malaysia Setj 

ori 

\eoouna 

l 

To Resist l 


■IfiW— T 


: aog ' ~* b '' 


•m»k" A'l** 


. Singapore : = •Steafiti.TirtiiSa >'.^= IgQL tj; : . 

Tpfoo’;- JW:- 

- in. i " - 1 l Y "V -- 1 • • ‘ ! -r ; ,J £“ 

'' Wmjf * 


Sources: Reuters. AFF 


Intcntaaoml Henld Trihwe 


Very briefly: 


• Malaysia may review its ban on reception of satellite television broad- 
casts in the future, and in any case, the ban will eventually become 
impossible to enforce, an Information Ministry official said 

• Petronas Gas Sdn., a unit of Malaysia’s national oil company, signed a 
$50 milH nn joint-venture contract with Confab Industrial SA of Brazil to 
build a gas pipdine, and another with Toyo Engineering Corp. of Japan 
for a $25.8 million gas processing plant 

• Tata lnw& Steel Cd’s domestic India sales of metal rose 7 percent to 
1 32 million tons, in the year ended March 31, while exports earned $24 1 
minio n, up 13 percent 

• Beijing has become the fifth-most-expenrive housing rental market in 
the world, the China Business Daily said; it said average monthly rent for 
foreigners in Beijing was 36 5 Hong Kong dollars ($4.75) per square foot. 

A FP. Reuters, AP. AFX 


FIDELITY PACIFIC FUND S.A. ( DISSOLVED) 

Registered address: Cade AqtuIlDo de tft Gnardia No 8, Panama I, Panama 

We hereby inform chose who were Shareholders of Fidelity Pacific Fund SA„ 
a Sociedad Anonima incorporaied under the laws of Panama, dial the Cor- 
poration ft as been dissolved as per the decision of the Shareholders at art 
Extraordinary General Meeting of January 11. 1994. 

Consequently, as from January 21. 1994, those who woe then Shareholders 
have been issued with new shares in Fidelity Funds -Pacific Fund. The old 
bearer certificates are to be returned to the registrar Fidelity Investments 
(Luxembourg) SA- Place de I'Htoile. BP 2174. L-I02I Luxembourg, for can- 
cellation and exchange. 


0 


REPUBLIC OF VENEZUELA 

CVG-ELECTRJFICACION DEL CARONl, GA. (EDELCA)' 
CARUACHI PROJECT 

CONTRACT No. 103-31 
IDB LOAN No. 788/OC -VE 

CONSTRUCTION OF THE POWERHOUSE, CONCRETE DAMS; 
AND SPILLWAY AND INSTALLATION OF AUXILIARY 
ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT 


NOTICE OF BIDS 
PREQUALIFICATION OF BIDDERS 




(.OWNER 

CV.G.- Eleetrfficarion del Caronl CA (EDELCA) 

2. PURPOSE OF THE PREQUAUHCATION 

The purpose of this pre^uallficatirai b do invite companies specialized in the 
construction of hydroelectric projets, from any member country of the 
Inreramerican Devek*mwnt Bonk (IDB). to present the documentation required to 
prcvjTHldy in the bidding process for construction of the works under Contract No. 
103-31 w the Caruachi Project. These works basically include the Powerhouse- 
Concrete Dans, and Spillway constructed on foundations excavated by others, and 
the Installation of Auxiliary Electrical and Mechanical Equipment. 

The Powerhouse will nave a length of 360 meters and will comprise six 
monoliths that will hnjse 12 eenemting units. The Powerhouse will aL<o include its 
conerpondlnc sendee boys plus one 60-mctei erection hay. The Main Dam will 
include the Intake structures, integrated with the Fowerhouse, comprising six 60- 
roeter wide monoliths. The Spillway will be the overflow type and have a kn»h of 
176 ratten and nine radial gates. The Installation of Auxiliary Electrical and 
Mechanical Equipment will include rhe following: Trashradcs, Bulkheads, and 
Gates for the Spillway and Intakes: Air Conditioning System. Isolated Phase Busses; 
Generator Switchgear. Disiriiwncvj Transformers and Control Boards; as well as the 
embedded pans for the Hydraulic Turbines. 

The other portions of the works, such as the supply and instaQarun nf principal 
generating equipment and the sujvW of electrical and mechanical equqmieni, wiD 
he accomplished (brought a sepaiare ridding process. 

3. FINANCING 

The works will be financed by EDELCA with its own funds and from IDB Loan 
No. 788/OC-VE The concracring of these works and the acquisition of goods under 
the 11% Loan is subject to the conditions in the Icon agreement. 

4. LOCATION OF THE PROJECT 

The Project is located at a site named Caruachi on the Omni River, about 36 
kilometers from its confluence with the Orinoco River, in the Caronl District of 
Bolivar State. Republic of Venezuela. The closest population center is Ciudad 
Guayana (30 km), which is composed of the cities of San Felix and Puerto Ordaz. 

5. CHAJIACTERISTICS OF THE WORKS 

The wotks to be executed under Contract 103-31 will essentially comprise t he 
construction of the Powerhouse, Concrete Dams, and Spillway and ine Installation 
of Auxiliary Electrical and Mechanical Equipment. 

The estimated cuostruction quantities for the principal structures are as follows: 


Integrated 

Powerhouse 517400 105,000 1 .243,800 

Dams 45.000 4D30 3554JOO 

Conmd Building 27,170 810 6,750 

Spillway 89,000 18.700 254.1 50 

Total 676,770 128340 1.859,700 

The Spillway will have nine radial gates each 1 5-24 metes wide by 2 1 .66 meters 
high . 

Each intake monolith will cnnraln two intakes with three gates each 
appruximately 53 meters wide by 16.5 meters high. 

6 . DELIVERY OF PREQUALTFICATION DOCUMENTS 

Companies interested in participating in rhe Prei}ualifi cation Process must 
obtain me Piequalificatkin Document. This Document is available in the offices of 
EDELCA '5 Dnrtrion tie Estudkx e Iryntieria. located on the 10th flow, Tone Las 
Mercedes. Avenida La Estancia. Chuao, Ouacas. Veneaiela (FAX No. 02-908- 
1696). The Document Is being delivered since March 10, 1994. upon receipt of a 
Qshien Check of Bs. 25,00ft in die name tf CVG Eleerrificaciaii del Caroni, CA 
(EDELCA). 

7 . PROCEDURES FOR PREQUAUHCATION 

The ptequaliflcarinn of bidders w/IJ be determined on the basis of legal, 
technical, operational, and financial capacity information requested in the 
lification Documents and in accordance with established procedures. 


i ithei- 




will he nresenied by the prospective hUWers. I he Uimmiltee must prejpare a 
technical report nn dw cormrsmlcs presr tiring qualificanons. explaining which have 
m6 have n« been pr&jual tried along with the appropriaie reasons. This repeat will 
be sent to the IDB. 

EDELCA will advise in writing rhose companies that 3K preuualineu to present 
bids. Likewise EDELCA will inform the companies that ate not prequalified. 
EDELCA will publish a notice in rhe newspaper of the list of companies 
pFRftedifled. 

8 . SCHEDULE FOR PREQUAUHCATION 

• The irccpticKi and opening rtf the CMltticarinns of piocpecrive hidiiers will 
take place at 9430 a.m. on May 1 1. 1994 in EDELCA’s office building; m Alfa 
Vista, Fueno Orea, Bolivar State. 

• The ftnhaHr in&iatktt of the Plncess fix the ftrpatatwn of ffids Septonfot 1994. 

• Approximate *an rf consmictitm: July 1995 

• Approx inwte end rtf construction: December 2001 

The Bidding Gunmirree 



















Page 18 

ADVERTISING SECTION 


j 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 1994 








sWi. 


; O t* ! 

V- *■ & 

%*» .• *ULS"^ S 


i v<( 


ssKrf*- 


f ........ . .. ..• • -wv-k:. ■ gc**#. «£7 V " V 


ADVERTISING section - 




X]i V 


f 

Lai 


np S i c 

MS^iKSjS£a!.3£:iii: 4 v m ,:; mni 08 ^ hm * 

An Expanding Range of Specialized Courses 




IK 






V 






\l- [ 1 ‘ 


■1.J?rV 








$L$k' •• 






s^Vfe^iv 5 * ”.y> j 




i 



Ml Ml" 1,1111 ■hum il III - r 


Oj 

~^r\ 



I 

£ 

is 




The most up-to-date studies can be pursued in the peaceful environs of some of Scandinavia's 
most venerable institutions. 



MIB 


Master’s Program 
in International 
Business 


ft The Helsinki Institute 

■ ■ a foundation established by the Vtweristy of Helm* 


a foundation established by the Univeristy of Helsinki 
and The City of Helsinki. 


* International management 
education from one of 
Scandinavia's leading 
business schools 

* Admission based on a 
bachelor's degree or equiva- 
lent and satisfactory test 
score on the GMAT test 


Offes expertise in: 

Privatization and Management Development 
for Eastern and Central European countries. 


S I candinavia’s 
growing number 
of foreign stu- 
dents testifies to 
the region’s ability to pro- 
vide international education 
in some of Europe’s most 
prestigious academic institu- 
tions. 

In the last year alone. 
Sweden has seen the number 
of foreign students arriving 
through the European 
ERASMUS program dou- 
ble, from 1,000 to well over 
2,000. 

With English-language 
programs in subjects rang- 
ing from Arctic studies to 
electrical engineering. 

' courses have been devel- 
oped that attract both ex- 
change and full-time stu- 
dents. 

At the forefront of such 
internationalization is the 
Stockholm School of Eco- 
nomics. Starting in January 
next year, foreign students 
who have gained a BA or 
BS from other countries 
will be able to enroll to 
complete an MS at the 
school. 

In other fields, however, 
the SSE has already estab- 
lished itself as a leader in 
Europe. The European In- 
stitute of Japanese Studies 
(EIJS) was established in 
1 992 and is committed to 
research and education in 
the Japanese and East Asian 
economic and business en- 
vironments. With the back- 
ing of the Swedish govern- 
ment, major Swedish busi- 
ness corporations and some 
150 Japanese corporations 
and individuals. EUS offers 
excellent resources. 

“The goal of our institute 
is to offer current and future 
European and Japanese poli- 
cymakers and corporate 
leaders the means to learn 
more from and about each 
other," says Professor Jean- 
Pierre Lehmann, director of 
EUS. 

The SSE is also a member 
of the Community of Euro- 
pean Management Schools 
(CEMS), an organization 
comprising 12 selected aca- 
demic institutions across 
Europe. In Norway, the in- 
stitution participating in the 
CEMS exchange program is 


the Norwegian School of 
Economics and Business 
Administration in Bergen. 
Being selected to take part in 
the scheme is in itself a mark 
of the school’s high stan- 
dards. says John Anderson, 
director of the school’s inter- 
national office. 

CEMS exchange students 
will be involved in the 
school's MIB program, 
which is taught in English. 
The MIB course at present 
has 30 students, is three se- 
mesters long and covers the 
major aspects of internation- 
al business, as well as some 


Arctic studies and 
Finnish mythology 
are some offerings 


Please contact Dr. Jan Peter Paul 


institute, Laivanrakentajantie 2, SF- 00980 Helsinki, Roland 
TeL +358-0-317 355 Fax. +3584-312 433 J 


* A challenging cross-cultural 
learning environment 



* Development of inter- 
national management skills 


For further information; 
Admission Office (MIB) 
NHH, Hellevrieo 3a 
N-5035 Bergen-SandvikeR 
Phone: +47 55 95 92 00 
Fax: +47 55 95 95 65 


THE BRITISH SCHOOL OF STOCKHOLM 


VSxjft 

University 






British School of Stockholm 
Ostra Valhalla vigen 17, 182 62 Stockholm, Sweden 
Telephone: 46-8-755 2375 - Telefax; 46-8-755 2635 
Member of COBISEC and EC1S 


A World 
of Education 


Niels Brock, Copenhagen Business 
College is the second largest edu- 
cational institution in Denmark 
with 40,000 students, more than 
1 200 employees and a turnover 
of 345 mill. DKK a year. 

Niels Brock is engaged in various 
projects abroad: from assisting the 
Baltic States establish business 
colleges to exporting know-how 
to the Far East Niels Brock offers 
a number of educations with an 
emphasis on international relati- 
ons. For example: 


flMRMnOMlE BACCALAUREATE 


at Hvitfeldtfika gymnariet in Gothenburg, Sweden 

Hvitfeldtska gymnasiet in Gothenburg offers the 
International Baccalaureate (IB) programme as a three year 
course including a pre-IB year. The tuition is in English. 

Hvitfeldtska is a modern school with traditions and is 
situated in the city centre. The school also offers several of 
the Swedish national programmes. 

For further information contact: 

HvltfeUfska gymnasiet 
Rektorsgutan 2 - S-4I I 33 COTHENBURG - SWEDEN 
Phone 446-31-778 64 54/52 - Fax. +46-31-81 17 97 J 


One of Sweden's leaders 
In student exchange. Par- 
ttetoates In Erasmus and 
ISEP exchange programs. 


areas - such as shipping eco- 
nomics - with particular rel- 
evance to Norway. 

Indeed, in many aspects of 
management and business 
leaching. Scandinavia has 
something special to con- 
tribute. The Norwegian 
School of Management! BL 
offers both MBA and MS 
programs in English. The 
MBA is a one-year, full- 
time course, while the MS 
lasts two years and allows 
students to specialize in en- 
ergy manage menu finance 
and economics, international 
marketing and the strategy 
or European management. 

“The MBA tries to focus 
on Scandinavian leadership 
techniques, the reliance on 
teamwork and the use of flat 
organizational structures, 
things which can still be a 
little unusual for people 
from other countries.’’ says 
Oyvind Bohren, dean of 
BJ's graduate program. 

These techniques, al- 
though well-established in 
Scandinavia, had not been 
previously taught in English. 
This was a big barrier in pre- 
venting the ideas from get- 
ting across, he adds. 

With Finland, Sweden and 
Norway having applied to 
join Denmark in the Euro- 
pean Union, future student- 
exchange programs orga- 
nized by the Union should 
be facilitated. These coun- 
tries' plans to enter the EU 
have also been reflected by a 
growing number of courses 
on European matters. 

Starting in September, 
Lund University will offer a 
new one-year masters pro- 
gram in European affairs. 
The program’s goal is to 
provide an advanced knowl- 
edge of the legal, economic 
ana political aspects of Eu- 
ropean affairs. 


Other new masters pro- 
grams at Lund include one 
in public international law. 
The course, which runs for 
two semesters, aims to give 
a sound know ledge of public 
international law in general 
and of human rights and hu- 
manitarian law in particular. 
The university's Department 
of Sociology also has a new 
masters program called 
“Rural Development: Soci- 
ety. Population and Environ- 
ment." 

Lund University, situated 
in the center of the pic- 
turesque old city of the same 
name, is the largest single 
establishment for research 
and higher education in 
Scandinavia. 

On a smaller scale. Vaxjo 
University in central Swe- 
den has a student population 
of around 6,000. Even here, 
an active exchange policy Is 
pursued, involving more 
than 250 overseas students 
even year. 

The university offers nine 
English-language programs, 
ranging from an MBA run in 
cooperation with the Univer- 
sity of Hertfordshire in Eng- 
land i q a doctoral course tn 
entrepreneurs hip. 

"It's not too big. With 
around 6.000 students, you 
can get to know people, 
even those that aren’t in 
your course.” says Vaxjo 
University's Jerker Persson. 

This year marks a signifi- 
cant change in Sweden's ed- 
ucational system with the 
privatization of two institu- 
tions of higher education, 
Chalmers Institute of Tech- 
nology and Jonkoping Uni- 
versity. 

The actual transfer of the 


Jonkoping University to the 
private sector will take place 


private sector will take place 
in July. This will also herald 
an expansion in the econom- 
ics and business-administra- 
tion department, which will 
become known as the 
Jonkoping International 
Business School. Student 
numbers will increase from 
600 to 1.600, with the facul- 


ty being upgraded to allow 
the granting of PhDs. 


the granting of PhDs. 

Jonkoping’s director, 
Charlie Karlsson, says priva- 
tization will give the institu- 
tion more freedom to pro- 
ride the kind of courses stu- 
dents are demanding. 

In Finland, die Center for 
International Mobility 
(CIMOj is the central body 
that coordinates internation- 
al studies and provides con- 
cise information on 140 


English-language programs 
at die nation’s universities 


and colleges. 

Some of these courses are 
unique, according to 


Direct exchange agree- 
ments with university 


partners In Australia, 
Japan, North America, 
as well as In Europe. 


For further Information, 
get In touch with: 


International Office 
Vaxjo University 

S-351 95 Vaxjo, Sweden 


grw lc frr * dn» attuteata 


Telephone: 

InL +46 470 685 00 
Fax: 

Int +46 470 837 85 


Forlafbrmliea iteUMriaivdi 


niqae EURAM-MBA 


1 year US/1 year Gemny 
21 nonthr Gaunt Management MBA 

Focus : 

Technology • Environment 
Strategy Finance 


contact 

CSQM, UnjvcjsiQr ofMiBneacu, 




EGM, ScUon, D-88339 Bad Waldstc, 
Germany .Fax- +49-75248836 


V International Business 
Baccalaureate (IBB) 

'■? School of Logistics 

V Export Technician 
Programme 

T Business 

Training Courses 

7 Official Toefl 
Test Center 


Please call or wme. if you wish to know 
more about Niels Brock. Copenhagen 
Business College. 


Phone: +45 33 11 05 00 
Fax: +45 331168 88 


NIELS BROCK 


Copenhagen Businas College 

Nprapigete 43 

DK-1602 Copenhagen V. Dann&k 


iiv.l \MI • \ > \ « CAN \l>v - M S I HAMA 
GLU.MAM • FKA.M.T-: * SPAIN • ITALY 



w mm 


International 
Language Schools 


Be> For adults and students, international classes 
**" From 2 weeks to one year, new courses every week 
All levels, from beginner to advanced 
=*■ Exam courses, TOEFL, Cambridge, DELF ere. 

| CALL TODAY FOR MOKE INFO: 1 


+46 - B6T93040 

Germany +49 - 4Q& 095 820 

Wand *368-0602655 

Engtan] - 71 401 8393 

-.*47-2241 6930 

Francs *33. M2 614 626 

Dgnrm. + 45 . 3312 mo 


Spsm *34- 14353012 

Betgaxn *32-26403302 

CH-Lauseme ... *41 -21 3128372 

UH-Zbnch ..-41- 12823302 

Neiterunts *31 - 70324 4O24 

ttaff.. *33-2 7789215 

Ausfra -*43 • J 512 8287 


ENGLAND * I S V • CANADA - AUSTRALIA 
GERMANY • FRANCK - SPAIN • n ALY 


University of Gothenburg, Sweden 
international Summer Academ y jPlJ 

Creative and Performing Arts Course Programme: August 1994 ^§§3^ 

Creating the Modem Musical, /uly 30-Aug. 7 Swedenand Contemporary Society CWne Programme: 

Modem Swedish Theatre & Drama, Aug. M3 Issues m "technica! and Vocational Education, Aug. 8-19 

The Healthy Voice, Au& 7-13 Agenda 21 at the Village Lewd, Aug. 14-26 

Composition Couree, Aug. 6*21 Nutrition in Daily Life, August (5-19 

Northern Light fait history}. Aug. 9-16 Swedish Mass Media. Between the State & the Maitet, Aug. 1 5-26 

International Ot^n Academy, Aug. 9-2Q Gender £■ Education, Aup [5-26 

WOOD- experimental worlishop. Aug. 14-24 Social Worts- Social Welrare in Swden.Ang 15-26 

Street Performance in Theory & Practice. August 1 5-27 Intwculwral Communication. Aug. 15-26 

Photography Workshop &Afeiy Ellen Mark USA. Aug. 22-27 Environmental Management The Swedish Sample. Aug. 17-25 

Information and appScattaos: Unhe rai ty of CotteabaBg. tnteraati o pal Summer Academy, Ggdnm Kaxtaflder, 
Project Administrator, Vasaparken, S-41 1 24 Codteabns. Sweden. TeL +46-31-773 j 104. Fax: +46-31-773 4660 


University of Helsinki 


Addr.: P.O. Box 3 (Ha8Buskalu6F) t FIN-00014 Urw&sty of Helsinki, Finland 
TeL: +3584-1911- Fax: + 3584-191 2176 


The University of 
Helsinki was foun- 
ded m 1640. With 

30.000 students, 

2.000 teachers 
and 8 faculties, it 
is one of the lar- 
gest universities 
in the Nordic 
countries. 


The University of Helsinki is an international university with 
more than 1 ,000 foreign students. Some 30 courses are 
given in English (e.g. Finnish Society and Culture, Russian 
and Fast European studies, Law, Science and Forestry.) 

The University of Helsinki has a large network of 
international cooperation and is one of Finland’s leaders in 
student exchange. 

Member of ERASMUS, NORDPLUS, TEMPUS, COMETT, 
R&D programmes; ISEP. 


CIMO’s communications 
manager. Merja Lankinen. 
One is the program in Arctic 
studies offered by the Arctic 
Center, itself part of the Uni- 
versity of Lapland in the 
north of the country. 

Among the newest pro- 
grams available is bioenergy 
studies at the University of 
Joensuu in eastern Finland. 
The new international pro- 
gram is designed to cany out 
in-depth analysis of the use 
of biofuels as a future source 
of energy to replace nuclear 
and fossil fuels. 

The country has taken in- 
ternationalization to heart, as 


Ms. Lankinen explains: 
'•Even the polytechnics in 
Finland give international 
programs, for example in 
hole), Testaurant and lourism 
management" 

The country’s largest aca- 
demic institution, however, 
remains Helsinki U’niversiiy. 
With 30,000 students, more 
than 1 .000 of them from 
abroad, it is one of the 
largest universities in the 
Nordic countries. 

Twenty- seven programs 
are offered in English!" rang- 
ing from postgraduate cours- 
es in molecular genetics to 
Finnish mythology. 






L- -7 
' r 

.j. 

\£: ?■ 

ffr \ 

* .4 



British ZatennthHo) School Oslo 
P.O. Box 7531, Skflkbefcfc 
N- 0205 OSLO 2, NORWAY 
TeL; +47-22-444916 
Pax: +47-22-551135 


B ERNADOTTE SCHOO L 

The vanish international School In Copenhagen 

- An interesting and exciting educational environment 
For farther information and consulting please contact: 


TeL +45-31 62 1215, Fax. +45-31 62 81 17 



jg| MATTL1DENS G YMN A sit r [yy 

I i* fl GHihtUltiocal L.' . _ , : _ 


efueonld. htt ton* 400 tludmZ. 

_ A • ^ 


^ rrua iwnt WU ttudmts. 

• International Baccalaureate 
- Finnish Matriculation Examination 

For farther information Contact: 

S? rmuKlu ™- Mattgtaiin-. 20 . 02230 ESPOO 
FINLAND. T di , 350^^8040 Wj,. Fax, 
















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 1994 


Page 19 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


'saP ?■:>. :V *.<• f :*‘ • '■ 


SSIUBURIIK 


i jjfflf! 



?, T?P 

ft % 

M 


English-Language Instruction 

Is Region’s Major Drawing Card 


or 99 percent of 
Sweden’s interna- 
tional companies, 
the corporate lan- 
guage is English” 
says Holger Formgren. of 
1HM Management Center. 

In other cultures, this 
might be considered a draw- 
back, or even a threat. Yet 
for Scandinavians, the use of 
English is deep-rooted, and 
the region provides some of 
the best English-language 
study programs available. 

For Mr. Formgren. this 
means teaching Scandina- 
vian business techniques to 
foreign managers of 
Swedish companies or to 
those who have regular deal- 
ings with Scandinavian 
companies and want better 
insight into how they oper- 


gree programs include prac- 
tical experience, and the in- 
stitute aims to ensure that 
pari of that experience is 
gained abroad. At present, 
almost a third of the students 
in the program come from 
outside Finland. 

The ease with which for- 
eign students can communi- 
cate with their colleagues 
and hosts also helps prevent 
them from becoming isolat- 
ed. Whether it is a question 
of dealing with academia, 
handling a transaction in the 
local bank or simply asking 
for directions, English is the 
only language they need to 
know. 

Bjom Axelsson, associate 
professor in business admin- 
istration at Uppsala Univer- 
sity. says that these factors 


=-,.Y V * 

mm 



L-s,; Ifi 


The value of Scandinavian business techniques is being in- 
creasingly recognized, and they are now being taught in Eng- 
lish. 


ate. This summer, for the 
first time in Stockholm, 
IHM will be offering mar- 
keting programs for senior 
marketing managers in Eng- 
lish. 

According to Mr. Form- 
gren, world business is be- 
coming increasingly aware 
of the strengths of Scandina- 
vian management methods. 
“If you look at many of the 
Japanese companies today, 
they have problems,” he 
says. “Now. it is Japanese 
managers who come here to 
learn the Scandinavian style 
of management” 

Business is not the only 
area in which international- 
ization has made the English 
language indispensable. Fin- 
land’s Vaasa Institute of 
Technology set up degree 
courses taught in English in 
architecture, electrical and 
electronic engineering, and 
mechanical and production 
engineering back in 1991- 

The aim was partly to cre- 
ate European and interna- 
tional awareness, but also to 
give students a strong 
grounding in fields where 
English is vital to profes- 
sional mobility and increas- 
ingly important for good ca- 
reer prospects. All the de- 


influence ibe choices made 
by exchange students. For 
him, the social life at Upp- 
sala University is one of the 
main advantages for foreign 
students. 

“One of our strongest 
points is the system of stu- 
dent nations, where foreign 
students can meet each other 
and mix with Swedes,” he 
says. These facilities, which 
are often open 24 hours a 
day, help the student inte- 
grate. 

Uppsala, 40 kilometers 
(25 miles) north of Stock- 
holm, takes around 150 ex- 
change students, mainly in 
courses on industrial mar- 
keting and business strategy. 

The common use of Eng- 
lish is particularly useful for 
students arriving for short 
courses who wish to gain 


^ MTHWATfOMAL GRADCJAIE SCKXX ^ 

oFsmitouimmrt 

One year postjaduate Bptaia prornm 
in Sodal Stem. AppSrafcn (feadBne, 
June 30 tor start In September. 
In f or mati on: 

TeL 46-8-163466 or fax 464155508 
International Graduate School 
Stockholm University 
l S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden, j 


some understanding of their 
surroundings but have no 
extra time for language stud- 
ies. Although Scandinavia is 
better known for its snow 
than for its sun, courses held 
in the summer months allow 
students to study while en- 
joying some of Europe’s 
most spectacular and un- 
spoiled countryside. 

Among the most interest- 
ing programs being offered 
this year are those by the 
University of Gothenburg on 
Sweden’s west coast. Short 
courses and workshops in 
various fields have been run- 
ning for the past three years, 
with a set of art courses be- 
ing added this year. 

According to Gunnar 
Sjostrom, dean of the faculty 
of fine and applied arts, 
‘Gothenburg University has 
a higher amount and varia- 
tion of education in the fine 
and applied arts than any 
other university in Northern 
Europe.” 

This year’s courses in- 
clude a composition pro- 
gram to be taught by com- 
posers from Scandinavia and 
Britain, an International Or- 
gan Academy and one enti- 
tled “The Healthy Voice," 
headed by an American pro- 
fessor, Oren Brown. 

In the visual arts, the 
School of Photography is 
running a workshop with the 
renowned American free- 
lance photographer Mary 
Ellen Mark, while the 
School of Design and Crafts 


workshop in wood. 

In Scandinavia, English- 
language education can start 
much earlier than university 
studies. The growing use of 
the International Baccalau- 
reate, or the IB, in schools 
throughout the region al- 
lows the standardization of 
international high-school 
education. The IB qualifies 
candidates for admission to 
universities and colleges 
worldwide. 

Leif Bemtsson, director of 
Copenhagen International 
School, is also chairman of 
the Heads Standing Confer- 
ence of IB. an organization 
that now includes 520 
schools in 71 different coun- 
tries. It is his opinion that in- 
ternational curricula will 
soon be established for 
younger pupils as well. 

With 425 pupils from 45 
different countries attending 


VAASA 
INSTITUTE OF 

technology 


AS me Finnish 

m *SSE2Z~" um,mm 

With opp omnfe slo peering 

JSSSBSSSS 

in addition, we ** iN ARCHITECTURE 

BACHELOR S DEORt ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ of 

All the programmes aS a n expression of our 

August. Theyca^ b ® ^mationa! awareness, 
aspiration to promot contact the Institute. 

For further information. P TECHNOLOGY 

W! — 


tiie Copenhagen Internation- 
al School, the atmosphere is 
something special. The 
school's move to a new site 
in Hellerup in the north of 
the city has proved a great 
success. 

Claes Goran Widlund, 
principal of the International 
School of Stockholm, also 
emphasizes the flexibility of 
the IB program. “With the 
IB, you can start your stud- 
ies in Stockholm and finish 
in New York or London" he 
points outs. 

Nowadays, it is not just in 
the capital cities that such 
services are provided. The 
Hvitfeldtska Gymnasium in 
Gothenburg, a state-funded 
school, has around 100 stu- 
dents in the IB course. 

The course was set up to 
cater to children who had 
completed much of their ed- 
ucation abroad. Jn a city that 
is home to many multina- 
tional companies as well as a 
large university, this was a 
common situation - one that 
English-language tuition and 
the IB program have been 
able to address. 

In Norway, the Skagerrak 
Gymnasium offers tiie IB 
course as well as Norwegian 
qualifications. Headmistress 
Elizabeth Norr explains that 
even for Norwegians going 
on to further education in 
Norway, being taught in 
English is a real advantage. 
Once students start attending 
colleges and universities, 
they find many texts are 


she says. 

In Finland, Mattlidens 
Gymnasium, 12 kilometers 
west of the center of Helsin- 
ki, is a member of the Euro- 
pean Council for Interna- 
tional Schools. Around 45 of 
its 350 students are now in 
the IB program. 

Other English-language 
schools offer different ap- 
proaches. The British 
School of Stockholm mainly 
follows the British national 
curriculum, while in Den- 
mark, the Bemadotte School 
stresses an English-language 
education based on the “ped- 
agogical principles of the 
host country.” 



B 


UNIVERSITY 

TMlLHlTTHIjlP PIWLU 
Bo* 277, 461 26 Trcflhiuan 

The University of Trollh&ttanJ 
UddemQa is the fasten growing 
university in Sweden. You will find 
ycmrse^inatopernmnded,creadve 


ud comes. 

✓Pirtksp^MomErxsBiSjCoBstt 

sriKTacfangeprogramaes. 

For farther bfrnwtio*, please contact 


INTERNATIONAL 
SCHOOL OF 
STOCKHOLM 

A private international school 
situated In central Stockholm. 
Covets pre-sdioo) through 9th grade 
Language of instruction ■ English 
British- American type of curriculum 

Accredited by 
European Council of 
Internationa] Schools 
and 

Middle States Association 
of Colleges and Schools. 

Johannesgatan 18 
S- 111 38 Stockholm 
Tel.: +46 8 24 97 15 
Fax: +46 8 10 52 89 


Box 936, $-461 29 TroUbattm, 
Swedes. TeL +46-52*47 59 <W 


,gps 

fif 

m 

mm 


m 


wiOSer to the Real Business World 

-Study at Jonkoping International Business School, 
'Use of charge- We offer students management 
Studies at advanced undergraduate level with 
v - ,; special emphasis on small and medium-sized 
enterprises. 

To provide International students with variety and choice. 
11 courses taught in English are available, tor example: 
Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Formation, SME Manage- 
ment and Business Development, Management Control 
Systems, Strategic Management, and European Company 
Law. 

Students who stay the full academic year can obtain 
a Bachelor's or Master’s Degree in Entrepreneurship, Marke- 
KH ting or Accounting. 

For further information and application forms: 

Mr Johan WlKlund, tMafl Johan.WiWund0ekon.hi.se, or Mr 
Johan Thor, E-Mail Johan.7hor0ekon.hj.se. 


mm 




* jOnkOfing international 
BUSINESS SCHOOL 
jOnkSpiwg uwvERsm- 
P-0. BOX 1025 

S-551 U. JONAOPWG. SWEDEN 
TELEPHONE +48 36 IS 77 00 
TELEFAX: +46 36 IB 50 B9 



Communication between East and West is being facilitated by new curricula and exchange programs. 

Gateway to Studies in Eastern Europe 


G eography and 
history have put 
Scandinavia’s 
universities and 
colleges in a unique position 
to offer a gateway to studies 
and trade in Russia and the 
Baltic republics. 

In fact, many of these 
links were established long 
before the collapse of the 
Communist regimes in East- 
ern Europe, although the 
opening of borders and 
minds has allowed the flow 
of ideas and students to mul- 
tiply. 

These links have proved 


holm School of Economics 
is setting up a sister institu- 
tion in the Latvian capital of 
Riga. The scheme has been 
financed by the Latvian and 
Swedish governments and 
by a grant from ihe Soros 
Foundation. It will start tak- 
ing students in July this 
year. 

“Eventually, we will send 
our exchange students there 
for a week or so if they 
wish," says the president of 
SSE, Professor Staffan Bu- 
renstam Linder. 

Sweden is not alone in 


taking an interest in the ex- 
panding markets to die east 
In Denmark, the Niels Brock 
Copenhagen Business Col- 
lege has established courses 
to attract students from the 
Baltic states as well from Sl 
P etersburg, Poland, Ukraine 
and Uzbekistan. 

“We became involved fol- 
lowing a request from the 
Danish Chamber of Com- 
merce in 1990," says Birde 
Berg, head of Niels Brock's 
international section. The 
expertise gathered since then 
has enabled the college to 
set up a business college in 


Tallin, with more than 100 
students. 

Now a new college is be- 
ing set up in Riga. Students 
who have reached the ninth 
grade will be able to pursue 
their studies here for an In- 
ternational Business Bac- 
calaureate. 

Mrs. Berg says the aim in 
both cases is also to train 
teachers so that the avail- 
ability of such courses in- 
creases. It is hoped that three 
other centers will be estab- . 
lished in Estonia, with five I 
more planned for Latvia. | 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION in NORWAY 

Skagerak Gymnas, Sandefjord 

FemdeiUmi.SSaprtkbmmma. m mp nftmaUag. mUptadBit A* xkoot sumnot b, 

Simd&wd. fOdo. tottriagfiw JtariMS bctwetn*tagciefI6JO. 

gp« pT»V ny™— 'UijjMy ^i.CTW^ffywialanilwitcmaiMnri glffcfliEraite min i Rm 
hi flfr quality. nK*rini*l eqpcscoee whether u ndone study far The IiUrjiurin ml 
BsccalmcHB or Norwegjxa Dipkwa. The School's padanoe toon, are on bend to 
■mV an gm iV j iu with mrivetsity and career options, whether in Norway or 
twt^fkiwany - Bnr farther inf onwrioi ptel» COBtlCC 

7J»H«odi*iitres*,SlkicerakGysmis,POBail54S,Fnu«n£%N- 

320$ S«nde!5flri l N(inn(y.Td:+47-S344fi0M.Fax: +47434 8958^2^^^^^— 


THE GREAT LAKES UNIVERSITIES OF FINLAND 

offer you 1 and 2-semester study programs taught in English 
Lappeearanta University of University of foensnn 


Technology 
’international Business and 

study toms to Rnsaa & Estonia). 


*EnriiaumtaI Science and Forestry. 
•Sadia, the Baltic Area and Eastern 
Europe (an interdisciplinary pogrun 


'Bkxoogy 


Both narewsfries are wanbea ofISEP. thejnuntaapqtd Student Exchange 
Pro&am based in Washirt%ioa D.C 

For fmtba information, please write to the lataatnioaal Stnaies Coarumatoi 
LappeemantaUnWiasiry of Technology Utrivetshy of Jocnsou 
P.O. Bex 20 P.O.Box 1U 

FIN-53851 Lwtreavwts F7N-80I01 Joensnu 

ffcc +358-53-571 2350 Fax: +358-73-1514588 


Take advantage 
of Finnish higher 
education 

The overall standard of education in Finland 
is extremely high. Wc have one of the densest 
networks of higher education institutes in 
Europe. 

AH of our 21 universities offer a number 
of study programs that can be taken entirely 
in English. You can also choose one of the 
22 polytechnics. 

Why not get acquainted ! CIMO is your 
link to higher education in Finland. Get in 
touch with us! We’U be glad to send you 
further details about studying in Finland. 

Centre for International Mobility CIMO 

P.O. Box 343 

FIN - 00531 Helsinki 

lHnland Pr 

phone + 358 0 7747 7677 gM# 

fax *358 0 7747 7064 

e-mail: cmUUtfbtooph.fi ti I M U 


In Finland, many institu- 
tions have had long-term 
links with the east Lappeen- 
ranta University of Technol- 
ogy is for the second year 
offering a summer program 
in international business. “It 
was a big success last sum- 
mer,” explains Helena Salo. 
director of the university's 
international office. “Stu- 
dents found it especially 
useful in the field of East- 
West trade, and enjoyed the 
study tours to Russia and the 
Baltic states.” 

Farther north, the Univer- 
sity of Joensuu also provides 


em Europe. According to 
Joensuu ’s international de- 
partment, one of the univer- 
sity’s most popular courses 
is entitled “Karelia, the 


Baltic Area and Eastern Eu- 
rope.” 

Situated in Finnish Kare- 
lia near the Russian border, 
Joensuu has experienced the 
region's complex history. 
The one-year interdiscipli- 
nary study program includes 
courses in geography, histo- 
ry and Finno-Baltic lan- 
guages as well as an interna- 
tional student-exchange pro- 

t ram with Petrozavodsk 
tate University in neigh- 
boring Russian Karelia. 

The university has dose 
links with the University of 
Tartu in Estonia and with 
universities in Sl Petersburg 
and Moscow. These links 
also offer opportunities for 
those taking another one- 
year program: Russian lan- 
guage and culture studies. 


Dear Reader, 

For further information on any of the 
following schools/universities, tick the 
appropriate box(es) and send the 
completed coupon to: 

Ronny Eide 

PO Box 115 - 5040 Paradis, Norway 
fee (47-55) 913 072 

□ Bemadotte Skolen 

□ British International School 

□ British School of Stockolm 

□ CIMO (Center of International Mobility) 

□ Copenhagen International School 

□ EF Education 

O Great Lakes University 

□ Helsinki Institute 

□ Helsinki University 

□ Hogskolan i Trollhattan/Uddevalla 

□ Hogskolan i Vaxjo 

□ Hvitfeldtska Gymnasiet 

□ ISGM 

□ International Graduate School 

□ International School of Stockholm 

□ International Summer Academy 

□ Jonkoping International Business School 

□ Mattlidens Gymnasium 

□ NHH 

□ Niels Brock, Copenhagen Business College 

□ Skagerak Gymnas 

□ Uppsala University 

□ Vaasa Technical Institute 

Name: 


Company: 


Address? 


City: 


Country: 


Fax: „ — 

5-4-94 









^ Page 20 


a. 


Gn 

F 


B 

C 

G 

G 

H 

T 

AB 

E 

F 

F 

G 

U 

AF 

AH 

B 

F 

L 

AU 

A 

A 

B 

C 

C 

G 

G 

G 

H 

H 

lr. 

It 

L 

N 

Si 

T. 

T 

U 

u 

V 

V 
«l 

AW 

A 

In 

It 

ht 

ah 

o 

G 

hr 

AS! 

Aa 

In 

A 

Si 

Aa 

ACf 

AO 

A* 

M 

A* 

G 

G 

H 

In 

V 
Si 

a«i 

A 

& 

G 

In 

Mg 

G 

If 

V 
Si 

AE 

A 

& 

& 

B- 

G 

C 

o 

G 

C> 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

Jr 

In 

lr 

In 

V 
ft 
M 
hi 

V 
N 
U 
N 
N 
M 
M 
N 
« 
W 
1C 

V 
IV 

V 
IV 
IV 

w 

IV 

/V 

N 

N 

U 

N 

N 

N 

P 

P 

O 

y 

y 

T 

VI 

Air 

B 

B 

E 

G 

L 

R 

Ait 

Air 

B 

B 

C 

G 

lc 

lr 

lr 

Si 

Air 

B 

C 

G 

lr 

lr 

Si 

T 

Air 

B 

C 

G 

lr 

lr 

Si 

T 

An 

E 

F 

lr 

An 

B 

E 

lr 

L 

Air 

C 

c 

c 

c 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

F 

F 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

H 

H 


EUS 

u 


U 


1C 


Mi 

Cf» 


r» 

Me 


o 



SPORTS 



Lakers Close In 
On the Nuggets 


The Associated Press 

Tbe Los Angeles Lakers were 6'4 
games behind tbe Denver Nuggets 
before Magic Johnson coached bis 
first game on March 27. 

Just eight days later, tbe Lakers 
are Vh behind in the race for the 
last Western Conference playoff 
spot, although the Nuggets' coach. 
Dan Issel insists he isn't feeling the 
heaL 

“i have said this before. I am not 
worried about the Lakers. 1 am 
worried about the Denver Nuggets. 
Period,” Issel said after a 108-98 
loss in Phoenix on Sunday nighL 

As the Suns were beating the 
Nuggets, Johnson was coaching the 


NBA HIGHLIGHTS 


Lakers to their season-high sixth 
straight victory at home, a 102-89 
defeat of the Atlanta Hawks. Los 
Angeles is now 4-1 under Johnson, 
while Denver is 0-3 since his debut. 

“I told them we’re gonna be 
there,” Johnson said of the playoff 
race. “They are starting to believe 
that if they play defense, they can 
get easy transition points. It's nice 
to see that they are believing now." 


Eiden Campbell had 17 points 
Lakers 


and 10 rebounds for the 
before his left eye was injured in 
the third quarter. He left the game 
midway through the period and 
was taken to a hospital for tests 
after experiencing double vision. 

But the Lakers still won by hold- 
ing the Hawks to 38 percent'shoot- 
ing. During Johnson's five games, 
they have allowed an average of 
90.6 points, compared with their 
defensive average of 104.3 before 
he took over. 


“From Day I, we started off with 
two problems; playing defense in 
our half-court ana our transition 


defense,” Johnson said. “I think we 
have corrected both of them. 
Teams are averaging about 91. 92 
points on us, and that’s where we 
want to be." 

Coach Lenny Wilkens, whose 
Hawks had beaten the Lakere by 
103-94 on Nov. 23. said he saw a 
different team this time. 

“They’re playing with a whole lot 
more energy and a lot more intensi- 
ty on defense, and that makes a 
world of difference," Wilkens said. 

Duane Ferrell scored 24 points 
and Stacy Augmon 20 for the 
Hawks. But Atlanta played without 
Danny Manning during its three- 
game West Coast trip because of an 
infection on his right elbow. 

Suns 108, Nuggets 88: Kevin 
Johnson scored a season-high 42 
points and had 17 assists as Phoe- 
nix won despite a nine-point third 
quarter. 

The Suns, who have beaten the 
Nuggets 11 consecutive times in 
Phoenix, extended their winning 
streak to five games despite the 
third-quarter drought that wiped 
out a 12-point halftime lead. 

Johnson made 14 of 23 field-goal 
attempts and 14 of 16 free throws. 

Trail Blazers 109, Nets 105: 
Portland clinched its lltb straight 
playoff berth, winning at New Jer- 
sey as Cyde Drexler made five free 
throws in the final 26 seconds and 
scored 25 of his 34 points in the 
second half. . 

The Trail Blazers trailed by 10 at 
halftime, but they scored 67 points 
in the second half, taking the lead 
for good with 26 seconds to go on 
Drexler’s two free throws. 

He then deflected the inbounds 
pass, stole the ball and was fouled 
with 23 seconds left. He made one 
free throw to push the lead to three 
points. 



NBA Draft’s No. 1? 
Duke’s Versatile Hitt 


By Michael Wilbon 

Washington Pan Service 




HARLOTTE, North Carolina — You can have Glenn Robinson. 


George Lynch swatted the ball away from Adam Keefe as tbe Lakers, once ; 


Viact BbcdiAiom! Fosh-Tibk 

on defense, defeated the visiting Hawks, 102-89. 


_ • You can have Jason Kidd. You can take anybody you want from 
college basketball as long as I can take Grant Hill the veiy best college 
player in the country. 

Every ganra he has played in the NCAA tournament has been some- 
thing special with the loud of talent, resourcefulness, intelligence and 
presence that should make him the No. 1 pick in the National Basketball 
Association’s draft. 

Robinson can score 50 points. Kidd makes us think of Magic Johnson; 
Rot they were at home watching when the championship game was 
played late Monday night. The supporting players on Purdue and Cal are 
about the «nv» as the supporting cast at Duke, but Grant Hill had mad£ 
Duke go. All he does is beat you a hundred different ways. 

He beat Robinson hhnmif, and Purdue, wiith d e fen s e. One-on-one] 
Blue Devil on Big Dog. He beat Florida in the s emifinals by stopping one 
erf the best 3-point shooters in the country at one end, then scoring of 
orchest rating almost every point at the other. He's the best defensive 
player in the country, and tbe most — " • — 

versatile offensive player. Vantage ! 

Duke had never won a national title Point / •; 

before HOI arrived from South Lakes — - 


Bulls 96, Pistons 93: Scot tic Pip- 
pen had 26 points, nine rebounds 
and nine assists as visiting Chicago 
completed a five-game season se- 
ries sweep of Detroit. 

Rockets 106, Clippers 98: Ha- 
keem Olajuwon got 39 points. 11 
rebounds and 6 blocked shots as 
Houston swept Los .Angeles for a 
second consecutive season. 

Dominique Wilkins had 36 
points and 11 rebounds for the 
Clippers in his 900 ih NBA game. 

Celtics 135, 76ers 112: Boston 
handed Philadelphia its 10th 
straight defeat, a franchise record 
11th consecutive loss at home and 
its 25th loss in 26 games overall as 
Sherman Douglas scored a season 
high 27 points and passed for a 
career high 22 assists. 


Dino Radja added 25 points for 
‘ their high- 


the Celtics, who posted 
est point total of the season. Their 
previous high was 129 against Sac- 
ramento on Dec. 8. 



North Carolina Women Win 
Tide, With the Shot of Shots 


High hi Reston, in the Virginia suburbs of Washington. Now, with good 
but not great running ma tes , Hill bad the Blue Devils back withm 40 
minutes erf a third NCAA title in four years. Three titles in an era of parity* 
That’s the kind of stuff associated with Lew Aldndor and Bill Walton. 


Vise Bacc'Ajnce rau Pmx 

Magic Johnson: ‘‘They are starting to believe.” 


,V« Ycrk Times Service 

RICHMOND. Vir ginia — If those watching the 
championship game ofthe National Collegiate Athletic 
Association women’s basketball tournament on nation- 
al television could hardly believe what they saw, neither 
could those who watched it in the Richmond Coliseum. 

Char] one Smith’s 20-foot shot — a 3-pom ter off an 
mboimds play b eginning with seven- tenths of a second 
left — gave North Carolina an improbable 60-59 vic- 
tory over Louisiana Tech. 

Smith, a 6-foot junior, had kept North Carolina in 
the game with 23 rebounds, a tournament record. But a 
3-point shooter she is cot, having made only 8 of 19 all 
season before the one that won Sunday night's game. 

With Tech ahead, 59-57, Tonya Sampson’s off-bal- 
ance for Carolina did not com: close. There was a 
scramble for the baB. Carolina got it and was able to 
call timeout with seven-tenths of a second left. 

Carolina tried to pul the ball in play, then called 
another timeout. The second time, the ball went to 
Smith on the far side. Up went the ball and, as the 
commercial goes, it caught nothing but net 


This is bow good Grant Hill is. And shame on us for taking so long to 
notice. Ask college basketball coaches to compare their own players over 
time and they balk; they say they don't want to rank them or get into 
making comparisons. Kit Mike Kxzyzewski, asked about H31 replied: 
“Grant Hiflis the best player I’ve ever coached, period.” 

There is no deficiency in Hill’s game. He handles the ball better than 
Robinson, shoots it nearly as well rebounds far above average for i 
playmaker, passes it belter than Robinson and plays better defense, hi 
the NSA, HtD, at 6 feet 7, (2 meters) can play ri tber guard spot or at souD 
forward. Robinson will be a great pro forward, but only a forward. Kid^gi 
passes better than Hill bat that’s xl A great passer can change the game * 
with that skill alone, but Kidd’s defense, shooting, and tenacity don't 
come dose, at thispdnt, to Grant Hill’s. Connecticut’s Donydl Marshal) 
was passed by Hflf on all scorecards about three games ago. 



he grabbed against Floods were almost absurd. “He hit big-time 3s wbaj 
they had to have than,” said Florida's coach, Lon Kruger. “He's so quick 
he could fall behind a step, but he makes it up so fast He did an 
incredible job on Craig Brown, who’s great without the ball.” | 


At some point, you want to see what a player does when he's dead tired. 


when his teammates are playing horribly, when he's down a dozenpomii 
iron. It’s & test HD1 passed calmly against Florida. 


SCOREBOARD 


in a championship situation. 

Even Calvin Hfll, his father and a man who knows a little something 
about performances in championship situations, was amazed. 




Try 


Portland 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

*-N«wYork 

51 H 

729 

— 

Orlando 

42 29 

592 

9-1 

Miami 

38 3* 

529 

14 

N«w Jersey 

37 34 

521 

14M 

Boston 

76 44 

J71 

25 

Wadilngton 

21 50 

.296 

30b 

Pnilodalpiilo 

21 51 

Central Division 

332 

31 

x -Atlanta 

53 22 

JJ9 4 

— 

x-Ctacago 

49 2* 

Ml 

3 

Clevelana 

41 31 

549 

9 

Indiana 

38 33 

535 

119* 

Charlotte 

32 38 

457 

17 

Detrait 

70 51 

582 

29b 

Milwaukee 

19 52 

268 

30b 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MMWHt Division 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

x-San Antonio 

52 20 

.722 

— 

x-Houstm 

51 2D 

.718 

'-j 

x-Utati 

45 27 

525 

1 

Denver 

35 35 

500 

16 

Mlnntsota 

19 52 

268 

32W 

Dallas 

B 43 

Pacific Division 

.113 

43 b 

x-Svottie 

54 17 

.761 

— 

x-Ptmmlx 

48 23 

■676 

4 

x-Portland 

43 30 

589 

12 

Goidtn Stata 

41 30 

577 

13 

L-A.Lak«rs 

32 39 

451 

22 

UA. Clippers 

25 *0 

253 

29 

Sacra memo 

2* 47 

238 

30 


If 23 32 15—109 
31 31 2S 28-109 
P: Sir icklantj 8-162-2 IB, Drexler 12-199-12341 
NJ: Colemon 11-31 5-5 29. Andeaon 8-29M21 
R abound*— Part kma 64 I B.W1 Miami 15). Now 
Jersey 53 (Brown 101. Assists— Porfl«td 23 
(Strickland 9), Now Jersey 25 I Andersen fj. 
Houston 25 31 M 30— IN 

LA. cuppers IS U H 32— 98 

H: Thorpe 4-10 5-5 >7,OtaiU«on 17-28 5-7 37; 
LA: Wilkins 1M0 6-0 36. Vaught 9-13 M 11 
Rebound*— Houston it lOloluwonlD.Los An- 
geles 55 1 Wilkins. Will lams 11). Ass is ts I l eus- 
Ian 29 I Smith 7), Los Ansalee 37 (Grant U». 
Hatton 33 35 30 20—135 

mitadeiiiMa 27 29 zt u-m 

B: Radio 1MB1-3 25. Dovalcall-181-227: P: 
weal tiers noon 11-14 l-l 23. Barrel 8-13 M 19. 
ReDow n a* - B oston 55 (Parian in; Philadel- 
phia 47 (Austin 9). Assists— Boston 40 (Dow- 
las 22). PfiBadelahla 25 I Barron 9). 

Denver 11 22 » 25- 90 

Phoenix 25 31 9 34— 101 

D: Mutombo7-l3 3-9 17, Abdul-Rauf 9-19 1-1 
21: P ; Cebaltos 0-13 4-4 16, Kjohnson 14-25 14- 
16 42. Rebounds— Denv or 48 IMuiombo 12), 
Phccnls 51 (Barkley 13). Assist*— Denver 22 
I JJ. Williams 7), Phoenix 37 (Kjohnson 17). 


NHL Standing* 


■ASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 


Atlanta 21 23 17 29- If 

LA Lateen 35 25 21 *4—112 

A: Fermi 9-15 641 34, Amman 4-9 12-15 20: 
LA: Campbell 0-15 1-3 17, van Exel 6-14 0-014. 
Rebounds— Atlanta 58 (Willis IS), Los Ange- 
les 56 (Campbell 10). Assists— AMonto 21 
(Blaylock 11), Los Anodes 30 (Van Exol 10). 



w 

L 

T PIS CF GA 

X-M.Y. Rangers 

49 

23 

7 

105 282 217 

x-Naw Jersey 

45 

23 

11 

101 290 209 

Washington 

36 

33 

10 

£2 254 344 

Florida 

32 

32 

14 

78 air 2i6 

PMtadotohia 

34 

38 

7 

75 a&0 301 

N.Y. islanders 

32 

35 

11 

75 262 249 

Tampa Bay 

27 

40 

11 

65 206 238 

Northeast Division 


x-PIttsburgh 

41 

25 

13 

95 267 267 

x-Mon treat 

39 

26 

14 

92 270 233 

x-Buflata 

41 

29 

9 

91 569 205 

x-Buston 

39 

27 

13 

91 270 239 

Quebec 

31 

40 

7 

69 255 272 

Hartford 

25 

46 

B 

56 212 271 

Ottawa 

13 

56 

9 

35 166 363 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 

Central Division 



W 

L 

T 

Pti GF GA 

x-Dftrolt 

44 

27 

8 

96 331 260 

x-Toromo 

40 

27 

12 

92 255 226 

x-Oallas 

40 

27 

12 

92 266 244 

x-St. Louis 

37 

31 

10 

84 248 262 

x-CWcoga 

36 

34 

9 

81 237 224 

Winnipeg 

23 

47 

8 

54 232 321 

Pacific Dlvlsloa 


x -Calgary 

38 

28 

13 

89 282 244 

x-Vancouver 

39 

37 

3 

81 269 259 

San Jose 

31 

33 

15 

77 241 253 

Anaheim 

31 

43 

5 

St 220 240 

Los Angeles 

26 

41 

11 

63 379 302 

Edmonton 

23 

44 

12 

56 248292 


30— M 
30-93 


x-cl Inched playoff berth 
SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Chicago 19 27 30 

Detroll 24 H 21 

C: Ptapen 8-20 B-10 26, Grant 7-14 2-2 16; O: 
Daman 6-14 i<3 15. Thomas 6-9 3-4 17. Re- 
bounds— Chicago 52 (Plnpan 9), Detroit 44 
(Anderson 15J. Assists— Chicago 25 (Plppen 
9), Detroit 30 (Hunter 8). 


FAMILY CIRCLE CUP 
women's Singles. Final 
Canchlla Martinez 12), Spam, def. Natalia 
Zvereva (6), Belarus, 6-4 64 

RIVER OAKS INTERNATIONAL 
Men's Staple*. Final 

Magnus Larnon Swoden, def. Rictwv Rom- 
berg. UA. 6-4, 6-2. 


x -clinched playoff berth 
SUNDAY’S RESULTS 
St. LOUlt 1110-3 

Detroit 0 2 10-3 

First Period; SL-Duchesne n (dp), second 
Period: Sl-HuII 53 ish); D-Yzerman 22 
(York, Sheppard) (ppi: D-Cottey 12 (Drap- 
er], Third Period: SL-Modtev 2 (Prokhorov,. 
Baron): D-Clccarolll 24 ISheoperd, ud- 
strom) (co). Shots on ml 1 . S.L (on Eiaensa) 


1 6-5-12-0— 33. D (on Jasooh) 11-22-15-2— SOL 
Boston 0 2 0—2 

Plttiburgn 3 2 1—4 

First Period: p-Taoitotatti 2 (Taccrtet); p- 
Stevens 29 (Jesr. Lemleux); P-Lemtevx Q 
(Francis. Murohv> ipei. Second Period: &- 
Wcsier 13 (Donato. Oates); B-Marots5 ISms- 
Qnsfil. Rrrld); P-Lcmlcux 14 1 Tcceftet. Fronds) 
l do): P-Muhon 32 (Eardstrcm. Tapltanettl). 
Third Period: P-stavens 40 Desr. Lemieux!. 
Shots on goal: B (on Barrosso) 12-20-10—42. P 
(on Casey. Rkmceau) 11-13-13-37. 

Dallas 1 4 1-4 

Wash (no ton 1 1 1—1 

First Period: W- Hunter 9 IKhnsNch. 
Miller); D-Maaono 44 (Ledyard. n. Broten) 
(pp). Second Period: D-Gaoner 27 (Gilchrist, 
Wokaluk); D-Ekivnd2 ICovolllm, N.Brotnn); 
D-Crota 12 (McPfwe. Ledvard); D-Gllchrlst 17 
COM: W-Siencr 7 I Juneau, Kflstlch) tpo). 
Third Period: W-Juneoul9 tPecke.PIvonka); 
D-Modano <7 (Courtnall) (en). Shots an soal: 
D (on Beaupre. Dafae, Beaucro) 9-4-7—22. W 
(an Wokaluk) 13-10-13—36. 

Edmonton 1 0 0-1 

Los Angeles 0 3 3—6 

First Period: E-Olausscn 10 (Beens Rice) 
(PP). Second Period: LA-RoMtollle 40(Zhit- 
nlk. Lang); LJV.-3lake 19 IZtiMnlk. Gretzky) 
(op); l_A.-Kiim 51 (Gretzky, Donnelly) (dp). 
Third Period: LA.-svdar 8 (Ward. Rvchel); 
LA.-Canochar 15 (Donnelly, Gretzky); L.A.- 
Zhimlk 12 (Donnelly, Kurrl) Ipp). Shots on 
ml: E (on Stauber) 10-14-12—34. UA. (on 
Ranford. Brattiwaltel 9-13-17—39. 

Catgarv 0 0 1— 1 

Chicago 0 3 0—3 

Second Period: Ch-Surer 5 (Ruutfu, Gra- 
ham) (pp): Ch-Ysebaert 12 (R. Sutter, 
Rwttui, Third Period: C- Roberts 41 (Zo- 
topskL iVolz). amis on ml: C (on BetfOur) 8- 
18-11—37. Qi (on Vernon) 1M2-10-32. 


Major League Scores 


23; Heoronveen ond WV. 21; FC Groningen. 
II; RKC 15; Combuur. U. 

1994 AFRICAN NATIONS CUP 
QoortCfflrMii 
Ivory Coast 2. Ghana 1 



me, “Dad, we’ve got young wys vriw need to be integrated. I can score 22 
points, but we might not win.’ 


PRE-SEASON EXHIBITION GAMES 
Sunday’s Results 
Chicago Cubs 9. Minnesota 5 
Milwaukee vs. Detroit at Washington, ecd. 
Chicago White So* at Nashville. caL rain 
Florida vs. Kansas City, cal. poor field 
Las Vegas Stars 6, San Diego 5 
California 5, Los Angeles * 

5an Francisco S. Oakland 3 

Sunday's Llnescore 


FREEPORT McMORAN CLASSIC 
Scam. efStJ million to umim i t, stayed on 
7,114- yard, oar-72 course In Now oneatts: 


“I was a skeptic, but he was right. Flaying the point has helped him 
understand other players. When be had to sub for Bobby Huriey," who; 
was injured, two years ago, “be saw how difficult it is to play the position,! 
how you had to be concerned about so many things, egos being dealt: 
with." 


SEASON OPENER 

St. LOOlS 102 210 DO0-6 II I 

Cincinnati «N Ml 500-4 « I 

Tewksbury. PaJacJas (7). Perez (9) and 
Poppos; RHaJ-Ruffln (4), j.Brantley island 
Oliver, Dorse ft 17). w— Tewksbury, 1-a 
L-HIIO.B-l. Sv-Peraz (1). HRs-St. Louis, 
Lankford (I). Cincinnati, RJanders (1). 


Ben Crenshaw. 

Jose Marta OtazenaL 
Sam Torrance. 

Demis PauMan. 

Mike Springer, 

Kenny Perrv. 

Dick Mast, 

Chris DIMarm 
Sieve Brocoe. 

Bobby Clompett, 


696068-66-373 

6634-1949—376 

47-7147.73-278 

7442-7548—379 

73- 694946—279 
49-7246-79—279 
71-49-7*47—2*1 

74- 704449— Ml 
7V47-72-71— 281 
7046-73-71— 2B1 


I TS OBVIOUSLY HELPED ffill flourish. When the Duke coaching 
staff made up a game plan for this year’s team, the primary question! 
was, “Who’s guarding Grant?" If it’s a guard, Hill’s going to post up. If 
it’s a bigger player, likely slowtr, Hill’s going outside. 


«er u 


; :■] i l»-- zn e - ; -• ! 


SECOND DAY-NIGHT INTERNATIONAL 
Sooth Africa vs. Aval ratio 
Monday Id Port Elizabeth, South Africa 
South Africa tan tag i: 2274 (58 avers) 


ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Aston Villa 0, Norwich 0 
Everton 0, Blackburn 3 
Ipswich 0. Coventry 3 
Mondiester United 3. Oldham 2 
Newcastle 0. Chelsea 0 
Queen's Park Rangers 0, Leeds 4 
Sheffield United I, Arsenal l 
Southampton 0. Manchaster Cltv t 
Tottenham ), West Hnm 4 
Wlmdedan 1, Liverpool 7 

DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
Willem II Tilburg 8 , fc Voiendam 2 
Soarto Rotterdam 2, Fc Twente Enschede s 
Vitesse Arnhem 4, vw Venla 0 
FC Utrecht 1, Roaa Jc Kerkrade f 
Standings: Alas, 44 points) Psrenoord, 41; 
P5V, 36; Rada JC, 35: nag Vitesse and FC 
Twente, 33; Willem ll,30r MW, 28; Sparta. 
27; GA Eagles, 26; FC Utrecht, 24; Votendam, 


BASEBALL 
American Lmvm 

CALIFORNIA— OatHmoa j.T. Snow. 1st 
baseman, to Vancouver, PCL. 

CHICAGO WHITE SOX— Bought contracts 
of Joe Halt ond Darrin Jecksan, outfielders, 
and Dennis Cook ond Scott Sanderson, Pitch- 
era, tram Nashville, AA. 

CLEVELAND — Sent Jason Grfmsley, 
pitcher, outright to Chartotte, I L Traded Jer^ 
•my Hernandez, pltdter, to Florida far Matt 
Tumor, pitcher. 

MILWAUKEE— Put Jose Mercedes, Pitch- 
er, on JS-dav disabled list. 

OAKLAND— Sent Ed Vasberg and Vince 
Horsntan p) tenors, to Tacoma PCL. Deslg- 
nated Kelly Downs, pltclwr, for assignment. 

SEATTLE— Qalmod Torey Lowlta. In- 
DtWer, off waivers from California Signed 
Rich Gossoge. pitcher, to 1-year contract. 
Claimed Torey Lovulto.lnflelder.off waivers 
from California. Sent Luis Sola InfleWer. and 
BUI Rlsley, pitcher, to mlnor-teague camp for 
reoalanmenf. 


Grant HiH is a walking mismatch, always in his team’s favor.. Robinson 
and Kidd can take over a game offensively, but neither can guard the 4 
opponent’s best player, ana at three positions, no less. ! ] ~ L 

“Whether it's ballhandling, defense, shooting, or presence,” Kny- 
zewski said, lie does everything at the highest level” 

The more he matures, the mare Hill reminds NBA scouts of Sarnie 
Kppeo. Against Florida, Hill scored a game-high 25 points, made 8-of-Uf 
shots — he was the only Bine Devil ova 50 percent — grabbed six 
rebounds and handed out five assists. Oh, he played aQ 40 minutes. 

Afterward, I asked an NBA scout if it was crazy to suggest that Hill 
should be the No. I pick ahead of Robinson, ahead of Kidd?That’8 what 

S uite a few of us are talking about now," the scout said. “It still probably 

qxmds on the team." . ; tai ilTIT 

But for one more night, Duke would be dependent on Hill. As a team, £»Sw!tc5 
the Kazorbacks would be too big, too quick, too deep, and Nolan 
Richardson is too good a coach for his team to have lapses. ' 

In a seven-game series, Duke could probably win once. 


showdown, you need to hit the note 
only once, hot sustain it And the' longer this tournament went on, the 
more Grant HH1 raninded^jcople of 1 988 . That year a itid named Danny 


Manning took over the NCAA tournament. He became a No. 1 pick ia 
the NBA draft, versatile and complete as a player. 


5*«:T- - - 
1 . 

\S... 


U’ 



For investment 
information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the IHT 


















^.SPORTS 

mil ti; A tty forty 

H * And Far Short 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 1994 


Pa«e 21 


’ m''. ft? • $ ' %; - 

■ ■ * ■ • ■■. ■ !• . . - y .7 ■* <•. 

>• r* -/-‘VWl'Jf'S-, ' - ' ‘ ■ ** " *• 





1 rv ‘ •“?.£> 


ft?* 


-In Cincinnati 

, By Claire Smith 

Ncv York Tunes Stmce 

CINCINNATI — The St, Louis Cardinals 
called it a season opener. The Cincinnati Reds 
didn’t want la And after a long night of 
pratfalls, both teams probably wished they 
could have called the 1994 maj or league opener 
a dress rehearsal. 

, Those feelings aside, what unfolded in frigid 
weather on Sunday night does count. And the 
Car d in al s , by virtue of a 6-4 victory, awoke up 
Monday as the first team atop the newly creat- 
ed National League Central Division. Con- 
versely, the Reds, thought by many to be the 
team to beat in the Central, found themselves 
in last place. 

The sluggish game, played in the damp that 
resulted from earlier rains and snowflakes, was 
rife with errors. Four were charged to fielders 
before the completion of the fifth i nning , three 
committed by the Reds. And runs were built 
not only on those errors, but on walks, wild 
pitches, passed balls and lax fundamentals like 
throws to the wrong base. 

Neither Joe Torre, manag er of the Cardi- 
nals, nor his opposite, Davey Johnson, could 
pass it all off as two teams just working on 
things. It counted, too much for Johnson, ap- 
parently. He became the first manager ejected 
this season. That happened in the fifth inning , 
when Johnson, believing Tony Fernandez was 
bit by a pitch, unsuccessfully argued the point 
with Terry Tata, the plate umpire. 


"■ ,-s*t 




_" :v 


• ■ 


^Tewksbury, tripped up his counterpart, Jose 
Rijo, with a two-out, two-run double in the 
fourth. Tewksbury, a 203 hitter last season, 
had wanted to avoid the plate for fear of 
striking out for the 100th time in his career as a 
national television audience watched. 

’ Instead, be catapulted himself into a tie for 
the league lead in runs batted in with teammate 
Ray Lankford, who opened the first inning 
with a home nm and singled in another run in 
the third. 



Alomar’s Single Saves Cleveland 
From Being No-Hit in New Park 


aSoSSSitiiLil 

Rub Kinre/Rnum 


Soccer Chiefs Gather in Zurich 


Reuters 

■ ZURICH — The top soccer officials of five 
continents arrived Monday for a crucial sum- 
mit with FIFA’s president, Joao Haveiange. 

Havdange, the 77-year-old Brazilian who 
' has been president of the sport’s world body 
since 1974, te seeking a final four-year term 

■ in the election at the FIFA Congress in 
' Chicago on the eve of the World Cup finals. 

But speculation has been rife that the 
European governing body, UEFA wary of 
losing its strong power base and World Cup 

piarra to the e mer g in g soccer continents, 

1 might name a rival candidate. 

The presidents of UEFA and the Sooth 
American, African, A si an and- CONCA=. 
CAP (Comal and North American and 
Caribbean) confederations will meet Tues- 
day with Havdange to discuss the election. 

CONCACAF and the African confedera- 
tion have Mated they will bade Haveiange, 

■ but there has been no inkling of how Ms 

fellow South Americans or the Asians stand. 

Havdange, under attack since he haired 
Pelfe fromthe Worfd Crip draw in Las Vegas 


nun ramus rectum 

Mr. CHnton throwing the bafl to open the American League season Monday in GnannatL 


The proved to be in keeping with the "This is really a weird game,” Marge Schott 
general am hianr* of the day. ror the Reds, the managing general partner of the Reds, 
rduclant to be host for the first-ever major- groused a couple of hours before it began, 
league Sunday night opener, gave a national “The traditional game will be tomorrow, with 
television audience an overall welcome that all the pomp, all the kids. Fm very much a 
proved to be as cold as the weather. traditionalist This is not tradition.” 

Alas, it wasn't a lesson in promotion, either. 
With Schott constantly referring all last week 
-a # j-jm • *■ to her displeasure over having to open on 

otnAT 1 TVl All moll Sunday night instead of Monday afternoon, 

uIHUl Ul # i ll 1 . ii/U th e Cinc innati fans got the message. The town 

that usually fills 52,952-seat Riverfront Stadi- 
in December over a row between the former um to the brim for the season opener turned 

star and the Brazilian confederation, vowed out just 32^03 people, the smallest crowd for a 

last wed: he would fight to remain president searon opener in Riverfront Stadium. 

The competition has be&mf hesaid what those who did show were treated to. 

an old-fashioned baseball game, was, 
He took ■ well, nothing. No introductions of the team s 

Britain m 1 974 wth thfe promise of greater TQSleT ^ ^ opening-day tradition. No banners. 

“ffi^dS^T^Twodd No mLwlSfbta bunting Noto* 
Cup tournament in Spain was increased to If baseball was concerned or angered over 
24 teams from 16 to accommodate more the Reds’ lack of enthusiasm for Sun<toy 
African, Asian and CONCACAF finalists. night’s game, the league s highest-ranking offi- 
Havelange last month guaranteed Asia cial did not reflect it. 
and CONCACAF an extra place, a third, at Leonard S. Coleman, Jr. the newly elected 

the 2002 finals. But he rated out a fourth preadent of the National League, explained 

nl»fy for Africa until at least 2006. that baseball schedulers-had wanted to be sure 

It has been widely speculated that FIFA’s to let the Rods — an original National League 

influential general secretary, Sepp Blatter of team —play its traditional role as host to the 

Switzerland, will seek the presidency, al- season’s first game. But he also said he under- 

though be has said he will back Havdange as stood the Reds’ concerns about baying their 

long as the Brazilian is running. traditional opening pre-game festivities, which 

UEFA's preadent, Lennart Johansson of always occur on a Monday, nsurpMl because 
Sweden, is also rumored to have to be seek- baseball wanted to accommodate ESPN, 

ing the FIFA job. The deadline for nonrinat- “We don’t want to diminish what this club 
ing candidate is April 16. .usually plans with its traditional opener,” he 

said. 


The Associated Press 

Sandy Alomar Jr. of ibe Cleve- 
land Indians singled to right field 
with no outs in the eighth inning in 
Cleveland on Monday, denying 
Randy Johnson of Seattle an open- 
ing-day no-hitter in the first game 
in the Indians’ new stadium. 

The hit started a rally for the 
Indians, who went on to win, 4-3, in 
11 innings. 

President Bill Clinton, celebrat- 
ing a sports fantasy day, helped 
dedicate the new park on the first 
day of the 1994 American League 
season before leaving for North 
Carolina to root for his beloved 
Arkansas Razorbacks in the 
NCAA basketball championship. 

Seattle’s third baseman, Edgar 
Martinez, left the game in the first 
inning after being hit by apitch on 
the right forearm. 

Martinez, the 1992 American 
League batting champion, was hit 
by a pitch from Dennis Martinez. 
He stayed in the game long enough 
to score on Eric Anthony’s sacrifice 
fly but was replaced at third base 
by Mike Blowers in the bottom of 
the firsL 

Edgar Martinez missed all but 42 
games last year because of an in- 
jured left hamstring muscle, after 
winning the batting title with a 343 
average the previous season. 

In Chicago, meanwhile, Hillary 
Rodham Gunton tossed out the 
ceremonial first pitch in the Cubs’ 


season opener against the New 
York Mets. 

Karl Rhodes of the Cubs hit solo 
home runs in his lust three at-bats 
in the game against the Mets* 
Dwight Gooden. He joined George 
Bdl as the only plaver to hit three 
home runs on opening day: Bell did 
it for Toronto at Kansas Citv on 
April 4,1988. 

Red Sox 9, Tigers & Thanks to 
some new speed, Boston got off to a 
fast start at home. Otis Nixon raced 
home on Mickey Tettleton's passed 
ball, capping a three-run eighth in- 
ning that gave the Red Sox a 9-8 
victory over the Detroit Tigers. 

Roger Clemens, coming off the 
worst of his 10 seasons, broke Cy 
Young's Red Sox record with Ms 
seventh opening-day start, but was 
hammered for eight runs in four 

innings 

Boston stole just 73 bases last 
season and signed Nixon to a J7 
million, two-year deal to bolster its 
offense. 

Andre Dawson, 24th on the ca- 
reer home nm list, Mt his 413th to 
give Boston a 1-0 lead in the sec- 
ond. 

Blue Jays 7, White Sox 3: Ro- 
berto Alomar and the rest of the 
Toronto team got to celebrate 
again in front of Jack McDowell 
and the Chicago White Sox. Hours 
after the Blue Jays received another 
set of World Series championship 
rings, Alomar hit a three-run 


homer that ted them past the White 
Sox and their Cy Young winner on 
Monday. 

Rookie Carlos Delgado and Ed 
Sprague added consecutive home 
runs for Toronto in the eighth in- 
ning as Juan Guzman and the two- 
time champions won before a sell- 
out crowd of 50,484 in Toronto. 

Guzman allowed two runs on 
seven Mis in seven innings. He 
struck out four and walked three. 
McDowell was tagged for four runs 
on eight hits in seven innings. He 
struck out five and walked two. 

Ron Karkovice Mt a solo home 
ran in the ninth for the White Sox 
off Greg CadareL 

Yankees 5, Rangers 3: Jimmy 
Key kepi Ms perfect opening-day 
record intact Monday, pitching 
New York to a 5-3 home victory 
over Texas. 

Key, 5-0 in openers, allowed five 
Mts in seven innings before doubles 
by David Hnlse and Will Qazk 
rhaefd him in the wghth- Bob 
Wickman relieved, and Xavier Her- 
nandez got three outs for the save: 

Wade Boggs bad four straight 
angles for the Yankees, and Danny 
Tanabull and Mike Stanley ho- 
mered. Joe DiMaggjo opened the 
season for the Yankees with a cere- 
monial first pitch. 

Key became the first Yankees 
pitcher to win consecutive opening- 
day starts since Mel Stottlemyre 
won three straight in 1967-69. The 









lulu Snenucfe/Rmcn. 


crowd erf 56,706 was the Largest 
opening-day crowd in Yankee Sta- 
dium history. 

In the National League’s first 
game on Sunday night in Qndn- 
nati, the Sl Louis Cardinals defeat- 
ed the Reds, 6-4. 

■ Strawberry Irks Dodgers 

Earlier, Maryann Hudson of the 
Los Angeles Times reported ; 

Darryl Strawberry, missing for 
nearly 24 horns, was found in ap- 
parently good health late Sunday, 
but his career with the Los Angeles 
Dodgers appeared to be over. 

In a sudden turn to what the 
Dodgers bad hoped would be a 
promising season for the troubled 
outfielder. Strawberry failed to 
show up for Sunday's game against 
the California Angels at Anaheim 
Stadium. Attempts to find him 
proved futile until about 8 P.M., 
when Strawberry spoke to the 
team’s executive vice president, 
Fred Qaire. Afterward, Claire is- 
sued a lose statement, calling 
Strawberry’s action inexcusable. 

“I have spoken to Danyl and he 
is with his family,” Qaire said. T 
am not satisfied with the explana- 
tion be has given me for Ms failure 
to report fra- the game today. I 
intend to meet with Danyl to re- 
view the matter in deutil and to 
determine what the appropriate 
disciplinary action wQi be. This 
type of behavior is extremely detri- 
mental to the balldub and will not 
be tolerated.” 

The Dodgers owe Strawberry 58 
million for two years, including this 
season, but Ms cot tract could be 
voided if be breached a standard 
good-behavior danse. The reason 
for his absence was not disclosed. 


TO OUR 
READERS 
IN FRANCE 

It's never 
been easier 
to subscribe 
and save 
with our new 
toll free 
service. 

Just call us 
today 

at 05437 437 



MPT TIT i 


Son CK War Triumphs 
In Irish Grand National 

’ DUBLIN (AF) — Son Of War, 
ridden by Frankie Woods, singed 
past Nuaffe one fence from borne 
Monday to win the Irish Grand 
National steeplechase. 

Nuaffe, which once ted by 10 
lengths on the heavy track, was 
passed by Son Of War in the last 
200 meters. Ebony Jane, last yeaYs 
winner, was third while the heavily 
backed High Peak was pulled up. 

Masters, British Open 
To Be Telecast by ESPN 
PARIS (IHT) — The Masters 
golf tournament this week and the 
British Open in July will be Recast 
Eve by ESPN International the 24- 
Ijoui satellite sports network said. 
A The British Open wdl be telecast 
m Asia, the Middle East, Africa 
and l -atm America, but the rights 
to the Masters could be obtained 
duly for Latin America and Africa, 
and will be telecast only in Arabic 
m Moslem countries of Africa. 

For die Record 
' Yamaha held a five-mile lead 
over Tokio in the fifth leg of the 

Whitbread ’Round- the-Worid Race, 
with New Zealand Endeavour, to* 
tram Justitia, Merit Cup and La 
Poste a mfle astern. (Reuters 
* PiKMhw soccer players were gtv- 

iSSKSKfig 

? YiriKtayter of Buffalo. withl8 

Ktrf tS regukr season but no 
the NHL playoffs- 


r ^ j l ESCOWS&222S- 

. 9$ »i ■ 

1 vi I * 

’ ^ • BELGRAVIA 

UK 071 589 5237 


FERRARI 

071 589 8200 


Crenshaw Heads for Masters 
With Victory in New Orleans 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Compiled by Our Siaff From Dispatches 

NEW ORLEANS — Former 
Masters champion Ben Crenshaw 
headed for Ms favorite tournament 
Monday with confidence and mo- 
mentum after having won the New 
Orleans Classic by beating two 
players he wfll compete agains t at 
Augusta NationaL 

Crenshaw shot Ms third straight 
4 -under-par 68 to defeat Jos6 Ma- 
ria OlazabaJ of Spain by three 
strokes on Sunday. Sam Torrance 
of Britain, who began the round 
tied with Crenshaw, chased him all 
day and even caught Mm once 
ypiii, finished third, five strokes 
back after bogeying No. 17 and 
double-bogeying No. 18. 

Crenshaw, whose 15-under-par 
273 shaved one stroke off 72-hole 
record at English Turn Golf Qub, 
won Ms 18th title and was in a 


firk major tournament, which be- 
gins Thursday. 

*Tm excited about the Masters I 
can’t wait to gel there," said the 42- 
year-old Texan, who won at Augus- 
ta National in 1984. 

OlazAbal shot a final-round 69 
with a big finish, while Torrance, 
having fallen apart down the 
stretch, carded 73. 

“I really thought 1 had it going 
there for a while, but 1 ejiess I just 
didn’t play wdl enough, said Tor- 
rance, who also is 42. Tm looking 
forward to nottweek. My game is 
obviously solid.” 

Crenshaw mod to leave Tor- 


rance in the dust early with birdies 
on the first, second and fifth holes. 
He made the turn with a two-stroke 
ed g<* but on the 10th hole Mt Ms 3- 
iron second shot into the water and 
made double bogy. 

That enabled Torrance to again 
tie for the lead. The tie lasted only 
three holes, however, as Cnaishaw 
jumped into a three-stroke advan- 
tage with birdies on 13 and 14 while 
Torrance bogeyed the 14th hole. 

Torrance out-played Crenshaw 
from tee to green on the back nine, 
but Crenshaw won with Ms putting. 

He birdie putts of 10, 12 

and 25 feet, and saved par with two 

substantial putts as wd l from 10 
feet on the 1 1th hole and 12 feet at 
the 16 th. 

Torrance said he was not sur- 
prised. 

“When you’re playing with Boa 
you expect Mm to hole everything,” 
he said. “He putts beautifully." 

OlazAbal was never a factor until 
he birdied the last two holes 
holing a bunker shot at the 18th — 
to pass the fading Torrance. 

“1 played well today, but 
couldn't bote a putt,” Olazabal 
said. “I had five birdie chances on 
the Cist six holes, but only made 
one of them. 

“Obviously it is a boost going 
into the Masters with a high finish 
hoe, but that is a different week 
and I don’t know what wfll happen 
there.” . 

Others heading for Georgia did 

not fare so well. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


"SfSS ISSF 

tsaesu 


-n 

: i 


•rew VJOlEf’ &eartj 5*r»ta 
■ MBS 

94 


MISS GENEVA & PARS 

Escort Agency 34400 89 credi onk 


"FIETTY WOMAN** 
QEfCVA * NUBS 
Exdusnv Enort Seme* * 321 99 61 





•••••••* TOKYO 

Escort / S»v*», Teteptone No. 

{03} 3351 • 2278 .open everyday cte 
evecioa 

ZUUOt/ BBN/ BASEL 

TA 077 / 57 29 67 

- • * FANTASIA y * 
BOSSES. Sr** 

Trf on 255 1030ft 02 3<3B153 

PAJQS ■ CJ.C • KOCT-fflwa 
TEL HIAGUE BSU5S&5 322 426 29 51 
US* CABMAN *F*8*3t 


^ - T) aantss® - ’ 

\yj, ■ 

■ . - - 


ssssru wksws 


~ — — TOKYO , 

••• 

EU/JAPAN boon & Guide Agency. 
IE TOKYO KBI 3588 -155ft 


IE TOKYO na 3588 -135ft 

MRAN • JUUA 

Cefl86 543?***** 

Eteoft oBdTVwsI SermLSpeaki 


■PARIS l LONDON* 

BfiGANT & EDUCATED * SCQUSVE 
Escort Semce London (71) 3W 5U5 



Nm escort same m ZUKH 
Teb 077/770190 ■ 7 dm* 

DOSSHDOtF/ GERMANY 

TeL 0211-279101 or 0172-2001651 


(03)34364596. 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


Two-time Masters champion 
Nick Faldo of Britain carded a fi- 
nal-round 74 but said that he was 
pleased was Ms preparation. 

“I played belter than I sawed,” 
he said “I'm working on better 
putting. Overall Tm happy, and 
feding good about my chances next 
week- 3 

Au gus ta-bound Australian Ian 
Baker-Finch tied for 27th at 2 un- 
der par, one stroke better than 
Faldo. 

But Payne Stewart, whose last 
victory came at the 1991 U.S. 
Open, had Knle reason for opti- 
mism. He shot weekend rounds of 
77 and 81 to finish last at 12 over 
par. 

• Stephen Ames, a 29-year-old 
from Trinidad and Tobago now 
residing in Calgary, Canada, 
gained his first European Tour vic- 
tory Monday in the Lyon Open. 

A final-round, 2 -over-par 74 
moved Mm up from third place as 
he finished at 282 in the rain and i 
wind. 

Gabriel Hjertstedt, the 22-year- 
old Swedish player who grew up m 
Australia, shot 77 but hung onto a 
second-place tie at 284 with Pedro 
Linhart of Spain. Linhart carded a 
72 for the day. 

Wayne Riley of Australia, who 
led entering the fourth round, skied 
to 79 and finished fourth at 285. He 
had three consecutive sub-70 
rounds before the 79. 

(Reuters, AP) 


chwsethai 

Hgsamag i 

mntv, to 84. - 


TODAY'S 

EDUCATION 

SPECIAL 

DIRECTORY 

Appears on Pages 5, 6, & 7 


CONHRMABIE DRAFTS 
BACKED BY CASH 

• bwed in Yam Name _ _ 

• Confirmed by Major W1 Barks 
to Prone AvofafcAy at Fur* 

■ Bodied by Plriw* Uftn 

CAPITAL SUPPORT COREL 

Ui (714) 757-1070 fa* 757-1270 

REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

PARIS A SUBURBS 


74 QIAMPS H.Y9B 

CLARIDGE 

FOR 1 WEBC OR MORE High does 
Teh (1) 44 13 33 N 


TO RENT * •••'• 

Handaidted QuoSly morlniBfL fll 

ESTES SdkbwSomAif ■ 

PARftBS TA n> 46 14 82 11. Fax: 
(1)47 7230% 


ST OOUD, ttmw AMBKAN School 

lOkJ IKARp WARXI|( XX tAMH R***V| 

3 bedroom^ 2 tufa, view oo peri 
FllSOftTefc (1) 47 23 0*BL 


PERSONALS 


AIW. 5 1967-1994 

CAU.Y, 

Yon are ny fowXain, happmsi and 

Wfth yem md yean of love aid none 

Irtrauld flort again, wrihm* a doubt 
To you rd jdedge etomciy devooL 

HIE l " U ; 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FJULCTA. die free Anglo Amniepn 
OMnxfing and trectmO support «■ 
ebes spouses, porwere end Jntafa at 
Dersaro HAV. + to meel fri end; of 
FAAOS Moacby ApnJ lft Amnam 


GENEVA 

SWTZBELAND 

Fall Senrioo 
is our Business 

• knternotionei low and taxes . 
a Mod box, riejiione, telex aid 
telecopier services 

a Trandaiion and ieerHanal wnnos 
m Fonralion. l ij nt d k f an and . 
adiwi»rt*ari of Swin end foreign 

mn mi tt 

a FunKhed offices and caaference 
roam far doty or maaMy rei*d 
FuS confidence and oscnAon aawoa 

BUSMESS ADVISORY 
SHVKBSA 

7 be May, 12D7 GENEVA 
Tel 736 05 4ft Tlx 41322?, Fax 7860644 



EMPLOYMENT 

DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 

FOOUCUBE COUPLE »ek job to- 
gether or HpanXdy. Fiendi/Span* 
Swe fa£ 1-CS3 <596 

LEGAL SERVICES 

Froe details hco TS^wk^T^KIm 
P ort.CA 72GB. Tet 714-647^476 ar 
far7u-wM5<g USA- 

low COST FLIGHTS 

DAILY RIGHTS ol lowed tare.toany 
naior infl cerpart an Id, hrwhnn & 

HOLIDAYS it TRAVEL 


□ HUXEGBHA& 

I mm* mm 


Tet P) '4 ni| 
FF27«P 


) pu P«»1 m dottie r 


Embassy Service 

AML YOUR REAL STATE 

AGENT IN PARIS 
Tet (1) 47.2030.05 


HZIMG W? — hovmg prtWews? 
SOS HEP otMib in 6 m«l 3 |ua- 
IV am. Tri: Pgis 01 <7 2380 8ft 

BUSINESS SERVICES 

$AVE ON 
international 
Phone Calls 

No* you caned the 
Ui and km a much as 
mnyared to bed pkme 
axnpanw or adbig cud an 
Cd frota hand, otoch or noKfa 
and avoid iwchcxgei. 
Amiable n all axnones. 

Od now for rotes and see haw 
you can begin saaig today, 
tioes open 24 noun. 

(SkaMbacK 


Tel: 1/206-2848600 
Foot 1/206-282-6666 

417 Second Amnue Wed 
Seattle, WA 98U9 USA 

Agent mquxies wetaww 


OFFSHORE COMPARES 
ROM £150 

Vmus sourtnes. FuS (HvioeL 
MTBWATK3NAL COMPANY 
SBMCES (UK) UMITH) 
Stondbrook House, 2 - 5 
Old Band Sheet. London W1X 3TB 
Tit + 44 71 493 4244 
Tlfc + 4471 491 MQ5 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OfFSHOE COMMIK5 

• Free proteiond axeuhdon 

• Wbravdde Bxspaiadoni 

• 1 P-‘- m JJjfc. 

BTRlIBUdr OWKO®T 

• Fii o u t fih rt d sennas 

• Unfan representoave 

■ FuB adnuanralion services 

ASTON CORPORATE TRUST® DD 
19, 1W toad. Daudas. bfc afMan 
M 0624 5K591 Fro0624 625126 


USA RESIDENTIAL 

HAWAII - 3-ACSE balling Hack. 
magnificent oeeen view, Saudi tip big 
idaidan randn edede. Pnwte sde 
S3SJM0- Contact omiv, lave broker- 
age Tet 61 9 3304361 or fax 61 9 
3304444 

MAUI HAWAII, OCEANFRONT 
Cgndot- JXOOO+ doMi/fufl price 
$140iH0-K tofraae finmiig - no 
gudnett. CoS 24 Koun. Tet WB665- 

REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

HOLLAND 



GtS APAITMBfTS •••• Long 

& Short Term Leases for fsead .fur- 
nahed houses & ft*. Tet +3] _g) 
6250071. Foe +31 20 6380475. 

J(erangmdil3^015G)^niienfara 

PARK ARIA FURNISHED 


AGB4GE CHAMPS B.YSBES 

meadds in famished apatoeeh, 
reudential anxa, 3 month s and am. 

Tat (11 42 25 32 25 

fax (1)45 63 37 09 


AT HOME 04 PAHS 
PAMS PROMO 

omnts u rerf famished or noi 


PROJECT FDUNCE MTBNAJ10NAL 
taaditti of rtemptio i i til funds, fat 
44 603 762239. 


faS“»«04 


IntenMtionrf 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


25 Av Hoeftn 7SM8far2fax 1-4561 1020 

Tet (1)45 63 25 60 

LATIN QUARTER, 2-room flof in town 
house, entrance, Utdien/bath, sunny. 
yjwTIhealinaOuniw'M! 143546569 
166, AYE DE VHSAlUfS, superb 4- 

room opartoert, mecooUy fwtjdjna 
FI 3^X30 + charges, owner 1-42307140 


Real Estate In the 

South of France, 
French Riviera and Monaco 

SPECIAL HEADING, 

APRIL 8, 1994 

To place your classified ad or for more information. 
Conta ct the IHT in Paris: 

TcL: (33-1) 46 37 93 85 
Fax: C33-D46 37 93 70 
or your local IJLT. Office or representative 


PLANNING TO RUN 
A CLASSIFIED A D? 

BROW NORTH AWHHCA 

INdHttfari). NEW YORK; 

TeL III 46 37 93 8$, TeL Q1 2752-3890. 

fac (1|46 37937ft UbMOj 572-7212. 

mo*** 

■EBTalg- ttfsw 

fac (021 ) 728 X 91. Fttc(852J922M19ft 

ltHS> KMGOON: tendon, 

14:107118364802. 

Tdac 262009. Fa* (65) 224 1566. 

Fac (071) 240 2254. 


s TP Sf*5d5S«V¥Y E.9BS7 Sri F-ELP-E= 







I ffJrJT I K I c rS I. I xTOo©®nooan©ono^Timmmmmmmmmnnnn 5 r^mw 5 sflm 5 H»:r*ooo 5 H 0 *f:?on»&*=f*sc»ncDw 5 ?»rQm»w$$H^OT>«zzzzz%%«??*?R?«;:ss?«*?*«% 3 ^ 


P 

I 

Ch 


On 

F 


Page 22 


ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


White House Futures 



W ASHINGTON — I was 
walking past the White 
House last week when a giant trac- 
tor-trailer drove up. 

The driver yelled to the guard at 
the gate; “Where do you want the 
pork bellies?" 

The guard checked his clipboard. 
“I don’t see anything about pork 
bellies on my ~ 
list. Are you sure 
you’re not look- 
ing for the De- 
partment of Ag- 
riculture?" 

“Yup. It says 
1600 Pennsylva- 
nia Avenue right 
hereon the man- 
ifest. Someone 
bought them in _ . , . 

the commodities mot™ 
market with the delivery date of 
today." 

“Maybe," I suggested, “the new 
White House chefordered them for 
tonight's state dinner." 

“You stay out of this, buster, " 
the guard said. He then turned to 
the driver, “You can’t dump them 
on the lawn because we're having 
an Easier egg hunt, and it wouldn't 
do to have the kids walking around 
with pork bellies in their baskets." 


Happy Landing, 
Happy Ending 

The Associated Press 

L ON DON — Des Moloney was 
coollieaded enough to know 
what to do when a faulty’ ejector 
seat shot him out of a small jet 
about half a mite up. His cool head 
is now supported by a sore neck, in 
a brace, bill he's otherwise none the 
worse for wear. 

Moloney was riding in a two-seat 
Provost jet trainer piloted by his 
brother Tom when the ejector seat 
malfunctioned. Des “went crashing 
through the canopy glass," Tom 
Moloney said. Although the seat's 
parachute was damaged, Moloney 
was able to get it partially open, 
which slowed his descent so that he 
wasn't badly injured when he landed 
in the grass near a supermarket in 
Colchester, northeast of London. 

“It feels great to be alive." he 
said Monday at Colchester General 
Hospital, where he was recovering 
from minor injuries. 


“Well, 1 have to get rid of them. 
What about the tennis court?" 

The guard was about to go to his 
telephone when another truck, al- 
most the same size, pulled up to the 
gate. It was packed with live cattle. 
Tie driver said, “These animals 
have to have water right away, or 
well be violating the health regula- 
tions concerning their treatment. 

“Are you delivering them here?" 

“That’s what I was told. Some- 
body at this address is dabbling in 
the commodities market and has to 
take delivery today." 

The guard looked really con- 
fused. Then a dump truck pulled 
into the driveway, and two men 
started shoveling soybeans over the 
fence. 

“What do you think you're do- 
ing?" the guard shouted 

“Two much rain in the Midwest 
— whoever bought these got stuck 
with a bundle." 

“I like tofu," I told the guard 

“Will you butt out?” he 
screamed. 

“1 was only trying to be belpfuL I 
am sure that if the White House is 
stuck with the soybeans the chef 
can come up with a soybean souffle 
to accompany the pork bellies." 

□ 

By this time Lhe cattle were get- 
ting' restless and started to bellow 
at the Secret Service men. If this 
wasn't enough, two truckloads of 
winter corn from Canada arrived 
and blocked Pennsylvania Avenue. 
The guard finally managed to get a 
White House staff member to come 
outside. 

I told the aide, “There’s always a 
chance when you buy com husk 
contracts that no one will buy them 
after you." 

He had been dealing with North 
Korea, Bosnia, South Africa and 
Ross Perot, but this was the first 
time he had had to deal with com- 
modity futures. 

He called George Stephanopou- 
los and gave him the entire story. 
George said be was on his way. By 
the time he got there the truck driv- 
er had released the cattle, and they 
were wandering all over the White 
House lawn. 

I know George and I said, “I 
have a slogan for the next Demo- 
cratic campaign, ‘Pork bellies. Stu- 
pid!’” 

George, who has a great sense of 
humor, didn’t laugh. 


Art and Madness: The Shadow of a Poet 


By Joan Dupont 

P ARIS — In the spring of 1946, An- 
tonis Artaud left an asylum in Rodez. 
in the middle of France, for a more gentle 
internment center near Paris. Racked by 
the cancer that killed him two years later, 
hooked on drugs, the poet was a difficult 
patient, a haunted, restless dervish. 

The father of the Theater of Cruelty put 
his entourage through the works; they be- 
came his actors, his audience. Now the 
drama of those last years has been played 
out in two engrossing films by Girard 
Mordillat: “La veritable histoire d' Artaud 
le Momo," a documentary, and “En com- 
pagnie d’ Antonin Artaud" with Sami Frey 
as the poete maudiL 
Frey, a slight, retiring man who sits in 
the shadows of this showy profession, 
looks as though he whittled hims elf down 
to the bone to play the emaciated Artaud. 
It was a job, he admits, that scared Urn. 
His fust instinct was to turn it down. 

“I wasn't sure I was the right person — 
Artaud's image was powerful, but I didn’t 
want to be part of his world, to speak his 
language," he said. “Mordillat worked on 
me; he convinced me that he didn’t want 
an imitation, but something else." 

The director and his actors spent eight 
months in preparation before fOmmg. 
Frey, a m a n of the theater, tikes it that 
way. “The movies I’ve prepared a long 
t im e ahead always worked. You avoid 
stress.” be said. 

The actor has a face, a voice and a flair 
for comedy, which be displayed as a su- 
perb young ruffian in Jean-Luc Godard’s 
“Bande k Part" (1964) and as pan of a 
raoaern love triangle in Coline Serreau's 
“Pourquoi Pas?" (1977). But he has mostly 
played dark angels, and on screen, he has 
been scarce: If Gerard Depardieu is buli- 
mic, Frey is picky. “I get a fair number of 
movie offers, but there has to be the right 
part and the right director. There are di- 
rectors I regret — Truffaut — and those I 
would like to meeL But they would have to 
want me. I'm no good at going out there.” 

As a young actor, he had read Artaud’s 
“Le Theatre et son double," but his real 
contact was partaking of Peter Brook’s 
1968 workshop, with the Royal Shake- 
speare Company: “There was Michael 
Lonsdale, Delphine Seyrig, and actors 
from The Open Theater. Brook was very 
influenced by Artaud; that was implicit in 
the work. 

“Actually, I'm very far away from Ar- 
taud, so the idea in doing the movie wasn't 
to do a hagiography or a revival but to see 
how the poet's words have traveled down 
to an actor today — me.” 

Much of the mystique around the poet is 
about drugs and madness. “It depends 



Actor Sami Frey as .Antonin Artaud: “I didn’t want to be part of Iris world. 


what you mean by mad" Frey said “We 
know now that his suffering ami the drugs 
were due to cancer.” 

Working a gains t the cliches, Frey used 
his own intonations: “When you hear Ar- 
taud’s voice in recordings, it's almost im- 
possible to listen to. Audiences today haw 
a different sensibility, so we didn't force 
that kind of reproduction. His words 
aren’t dated — they are still vibrant, bril- 
liant and profound” 

Words, for Frey, are to be rolled on the 
tongue, but not wasted: “I'm sensitive to 
language;” He is a punctual exacting per- 
son, spelling out memories, reciting dates: 
“I was 17 and a half when I played in my 
first boulevard comedy. It was Terence 
Rattigan’s “Sleeping Prince.' I didn’t play 
the Laurence Olivier role, but the hole 
king.” From the boulevard he went on to 
play Brecht, Claudel Racine and Piran- 
dello. 

The small dark and handsome actor 
may have little in common with the tor- 


tured Artaud, but be always bad what he 
calls a vocation. Artaud as a young actor, 

made a smold ering im p res s ion in films lik e 
Abel Gance’s “Napoleon” and Carl 
Dreyer's “La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc.” 
Frey’s first taste of the Theater of Cruelty 
was playing in Hexui-Georges Qouzot's 
“La Veriic (I960). He made a carefree 
entrance, biking down a Paris street, and 
landed in a fatal liaison with Brigitte Bar- 
dot. 

Gonzot was a specialist of preparatory 
sessions that crackled with sadism. “For 
me the movie was an idyllic experience, 
but for those who played his game, it was a 
nightmare." Frey said “He tortured them. 
I wasn’t given the treatme n t because he 
probably realized he would just scare me 
to death and not grt any thing out of me." 

For many years, both mi stage and off, 
the actor and the late Delphine Seyrig 
were a couple. Graceful gifted with har- 
monious voices — iris intense and reedy, 
hers evanescent, a musical mu rm ur — they 
seemed to step out of another century. Yet 


thev had a penchant for the avant-garde 
authors of the day — Harold Pinter, Peter 
Handke and Marguerite Duras. Recently, 
Frev has done his own adaptations and 
staging of Pinter’s “Old Times," and 
Georges Perec's “Je me souviens," an as- 
tonishing one-man show he performed on 
a bicycle. 

“Atypical is how my career has been 
described” he said laughing- “I looked it 
up in my dictionary. Maybe it's been atyp- 
ical because I never had a career plan." 

Frey was bom in Paris; during the war. 
his family lived in Rodez, the town where 
Artaud was incarcerated: “Strange, yes. I 
was only S and a half, so I don't remember 
much about Rodez.” His parents died 
when he was a child; he was brought up by 
relatives and left school early, determined 
to act. 

“Acting was my idea, I think I can call it 
a vocation. I couldn't imagine life other- 
wise — I love speaking all those words that, 
aren’t mine. Reading came late, and it was 
as if those books were inside me. Discover- 
ing that somebody else was the author 
made me want to steal them, make them 
mine, and communicate them.” 

“Je me souviens” was a rich haul a 
poetic incantation spun out to the rhythm 
of bicycle wheels. Frey concocted the 
whole show, from having the bicyde built, 
tO planting small mikes throughout the 
theater to pick up the sound; on stage, he 
pedaled away, reciting a repetitive text, 
each sentence beginning with, “I remem- 
ber ” 

“I needed a big stage to create a sense of 
distance from that little biker moving in 
space: Actually, I would have loved to 
stage it at the Op6ra. I could have played 
that pan for 10 years!" 

He bicycles everywhere, in the moun- 
tains, all over Paris. “I wanted to commu- 
nicate that sensation of motion and light- 
ness — I'd never seen anything like it on 
stage. So I looked for a text to go with 
biking. Actually, you can say anything on 
a bike and it works — tell a story, recite 
Mass or a litany, like Jews in front of the 
Waiting Wafl." 

As he talks, he keeps an eye out for his 
bike, parked by the cate: “Two of my 
bicycles woe stolen, but I found one, with 
the thief riding id I ran after him and told 
him it was my bike: He said, ‘Prove it.’ I 
could prove it because it had been special- 
ly made for the stage, it was signed. So he 
had to give it back. He was a young man, 
but even if he had been an old man — like 
in The Bicycle Thief — I still would have 
made him give my bike back.” 

Joan Dupont is a Paris-based writer spe- 
cializing in the arts. 


PEOPLE 


Oscar Winner's Parents 
PutHollyicoodon Hold 

V 

Aims Prase, the 1 1-year-old Os. 
car winner, has signed with a major 
U. S. agent to help her cope with 
pressure from moviemakers, the 
New Zealand Herald reports. Even 
bdore being named best supporting 
actress for “The Piano" last month, 
she was being in undated with Ho IN*, 
wood offers, and her New ZealanCr 
agent. Gai Cowan, has signed her 
with the William Morris agency to 
Add the calls. Anna's parents warn 
her oiu of the spotlight “They want 
her to have a childhood — Holly- 
wood doesn’t," Cowan said. 

□ 

You’ve heard it all before; The 
Rolling Stones’ lead guitarist, Brfea 
Jones, was officially held to have 
drowned accidentally in his swim- 
ming pod at the age of 27 in 1969, 
but two new books revive conten- 
tions that he was murdered. Both 
books — “Paint It Black: The Mur- 
der of Brian Jones” by Geoffrey 
Giufiano and “Who Killed Christo- 
pher Robin?” by Terry Rawlings — 
say he was killed by a London 
builder, Frank Thorogood, who 
died in November. According to 
excerpts from Rawlings's book in 
the News of the World, Thorogood 
was said to have made a death-bed 
confession. The cornerstone of 
Giuliano’s book, excerpted in The 
People newspaper. is a recording of 
an unidentified witness who was at 
Jones’s house the night he died. 

□ 

The model Christie Brinkley and 
four other people were stranded on 
a mountainside for about five 
hours after their helicopter crashed 
in Colorado, until another chopper, 
fighting heavy wind and snow£ 
picked them up. 

□ 

A concert with U2, Bruce 

for The^Stog 
Officials of Ehis Presley’s Grace- 
land estate are planning their first 
tribute to Elvis, set for October is 
Memphis, Tennessee. “Just about 
any superstar who’s mentioned El- 
vis as an influence has been consid- 
ered,” Grace! and's spokesman. Da- 
vid Beckwith, said He wouldn't 
say who, if anyone, bad accepted. 




lerln* 1 

w *3 

\i - i 

bit? 1 




INTERNATIONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Pages S,6,7& ZJ 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by Accu-Weather. Asia 



Todev 




Mqh 

Low 

W 

High 

LOW W 


OF 

OF 


OF 

OF 

Alpm m 

20 m 

10/50 

■ 

21/70 

1355 S 

Amsterdam 

10/50 

8/43 

*h 

11/52 

409 pc 

Ank»t* 

23/73 

7/44 

s 

19/68 

E *43 pc 

Miera 

19KB 

12*3 

1 

14/57 

9/40 9h 

Bweefcm 

14/57 

fl/43 

pe 

IE/61 

9/48 S 

(Mgrade 

17/62 

7/44 

r 

14/57 

7(44 r 

Berlin 

9/46 

.IOI 

Hi 

12/53 

205 pe 

Brusmb 

9/46 

-1/31 

Hi 

12/53 

104 | 


13/01 

4/33 

r 

13/55 

7144 1 

Copenhagen 

BM6 

1/34 


1C/50 

1/34 Hi 

Casa Del So/ 

20/68 

12/53 

■ 

21/70 

13.53 ■ 

Dubfri 

7M4 

3/37 

Hi 

8.46 

1/34 c 

Edrtaxgh 

7/44 

4/39 

sfi 

0/46 

307 C 


14/S7 

■1/31 

Hi 

13/55 

403 pc 

Frankfurt 

10/M 

3/37 

■h 

12/53 

4/38 pc 

Geneva 

12/53 

8/43 

Hi 

13/55 

409 S 

HetairW 

8/43 

1/34 

Hi 

B/48 

307 c 

U*nM 

22/71 

9/48 


16/81 

7/44 1 

Lu Palme* 

24/75 

18/64 

1 

23/73 

18*4 pc 

Lisbon 

19/88 

11/52 

1 

18/84 

13/55 « 


9/48 

2/35 

Hi 

11/52 

4/3B pc 

ksarktd 

16/81 

7/44 


17/82 

0/43 s 

Mam 

12/53 

-2/29 

oh 

16/61 

409 > 

Hoecow 

B/48 

2/95 


12/53 

400 e 

Until 

BMO 

-4/26 

c 

11/52 

002 ■ 

Nice 

12/53 

2/35 


14/57 

8/43 s 

Chto 

6/43 

0<32 

Hi 

9/48 

•1/31 e 

Pekin 

13/55 

7/44 


15/50 

11/52 8 

Pan 

9/48 

2KB 

Hi 

12/53 

3/37 ■ 

Pnifisja 

10/50 

•1/31 

c 

13/55 

2/35 ■ 

Heyfcj** 

3/37 

-1/31 

mh 

6/43 

-1/31 0 

Romo 

18/01 

7/44 

■ 

13/55 

8/46 Hi 

St Petontu] 

9/40 

307 

s 

14/57 

5M1 pc 

aocWwtai 

7/44 

1/34 

■h 

B/48 

2/35 Ih 

S&arijoug 

B/48 

■4/25 

■h 

13/65 

1/34 s 

Tafcvi 

8/43 

2/35 

ih 

9/48 

307 e 

V«nco 

13/55 

4/30 

■h 

13/55 

7/44 pc 

Vkrra 

12/53 

1/34 

r 

11/52 

409 ■ 

Vlmrtn 

14/57 

2/35 

Hi 

14IB7 

8/43 pc 

Zufcfi 

8/46 

-3/27 

•h 

13/55 

2/35 8 

Oceania 

Auckland 

21/70 

14/57 

A 

21/70 

14/57 8 

Sydney 

23/73 

10/61 

1* 

23773 

14167 8 



JoHlWRI 

North America 

PNbdelptiia lo Boston win 
have b soaking rain at mid- 
week. Snow will tall over 
northern New England and 
eastern Canada. Chicago 
will have chilly weather al 
midweek. Friday will be 
sunny and milder. Rain will 
move Into lhe Pacfflc North- 
west tala this week. 


Europe 

The dominant weather tea- 
lure on lhe weather map 
later this week wfll be a slow- 
moving storm over south- 
eastern Europe. It wBI gener- 
ate heavy rains from Saraje- 
vo through Athens and 
Bucharest London to Paris 
will have dry. seasonable 
weather at midweek. Stormy 
weather wn arrive Friday. 


Hmw 

Snow 


Asia 

Eastern China will have 
sunny, warm weather today. 
Beilina through Shanghai 
and Hong Kong are all 
Included. The remnants of 
Owen will shift westward 
across tie South China See 
at midweek. Bangkok wS be 
sunny and warm. Tokyo wil 
have warm weather at mid- 
week. 


Asia 




Tomorrow 


Mgh 

Low 

W 


Low W 


OF 

C/F 


OF 

OF 

taitfe* 

94/99 

26/79 

Hi 3505 

28/79 1 


28/79 

14(57 

3 

28/79 

14*7 pc 

HgngKeng 

25/77 

20150 

pe 24/78 

TWO Hi 

31/88 

22/71 

Hi 

92/89 

ZJ/ 73 Hi 

New MB 

34/83 

1906 


32/89 

19*6 a 

Seoul 

22m 

11/52 


23/73 

11/52 pc 

Shonghei 

21/70 

16/59 


23/73 

14*7 pc 

ssr 

33/68 

26/79 

73/73 

19*6 

pe 

32/69 

28/79 

23/73 | 
19/88 Hi 

Tokyo 

16/88 

9M8 

1 

16/68 

9/48 pc 

Africa 

Algiera 

1804 

9/48 

pe 

16/84 

11/52 pc 

Cape Town 

27/BO 

16/81 

■ 

28/78 

15/39 pc 

Coeblanca 

23/73 

11*2 

a 

22/71 

13155 pc 

Harare 

21/70 

7/44 

pc 20/79 

11/52 pc 


31(88 

24/75 

Hi 

32/89 

26/79 ■ 

NekiJ 

24/76 

13*5 


25/77 

14*7 pc 

T«* 

18/81 

4/39 

PC 

17/62 

8/43 pc 

North America 


ACROSS 

1 Zubin with a 
baton 

s Okl streetlight 

13 Daley and 
others 

14 Gravel-voiced 
actress 

is Iron shortage 

ie Commit 

17 Just the 
highlights 

ia Slarnmin" Sam 

18 Trendy 


2 oGettmgbeuer. 
as wine: Var. 

aa Up to now 

zeSize up 

28 Paints 
amateurishly 

28 Almost shut 

32 Kind of symbol 

33 One whom 
Jesus healed 

34 Rodeo rope 

35 Dashboard 
reading, for 
short 


Andnage 


Sort* 

CMcago 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Baku 

Cato 


Luxor 

Riyadh 


ToWy 

Mgh Low W 
OF OF 
20/78 17/82 ■ 
32/89 ISM ■ 
3700 11« i 
24/76 14167 ■ 
387100 1B«1 a 
31 m 1«tt1 po 


To 

High Low W 
CIF OF 
20/78 1SAS1 p« 
31/88 14457 S 
20 m 12/53 ■ 
23/73 13/6S ■ 
407104 17/82 1 
36/07 10/64 ■ 


Today 

Mgh Low W High Low W 
OF OF OF OF 

BunaMm 21/70 IMI r 23/73 12A3 ■ 

Cam m 30/00 24/75 a 31MB 24/76 a 

Lima 23 03 18*4 po 24776 19/80 pc 

MwdcoCKy 28/82 1Z«3 a 26182 12/33 po 

Rtodwbnahp 27/80 20 AW pc 28 «2 22/71 ah 

SanUago 21/70 7/44 pc 25/77 SMS po 


Data* 

htonoMu 

HouHon 

LnAngdaa 

Mam) 

Hw wa p oBa 


LogamL- a-sunny. popart/y cloudy. odoudy. sh-srtowars. Hhunderstorms. r-raln, sf-anow Burrtas, 
an-anow. Hca. W-Wrnipw- AB nrnps, forecaot* and data prendded by AoowWo aW lsr. Ino. C 1SH 


NtwYMl 
Pho an fa 
San Fran. 
8MBta 
ToarCo 


10/80 

22771 

18761 

S/43 

2/96 

10/BO 

27/80 

26/78 

23/73 

29/84 

2/36 

10/90 

2B/B4 

IB/81 

25777 

19/66 

19/66 

10/50 

22771 


-1/31 

13/05 

B/48 

-1/31 

■6/24 

205 

21/70 

14/57 

12*3 

22/71 

-7/20 

■2/29 

22/71 

SMB 

*2*3 

am 

BM3 

002 

10/60 


a 9/48 

pe 2MB 
S 12/53 
r 5/41 
M 7/44 
r 4/39 
ah 2802 
I 22/71 
pe 21/70 
a 28/82 
pc 2/35 
pe 7/44 
pc 29/84 
a 18/81 
1 27/BO 
I 17*2 
C 12*3 
PC 9/48 


-2/29 pc 
9MB *1 
6/41 ah 
-3/27 pe 
■SOT pe 
■307 r 
21/70 pc 
8/48 pc 

11/62 pe 
20758 pc 
-8/18 a 
OKB c 
22/71 pc 
9/46 ah 

12*3 a 
8/46 pc 
4/39 (h 
•1/31 r 
10/60 Hi 


Solution to Puzzle of April 4- 


□DHDC 3 □□□□ □CI 313 IS 

□snra Sana nagtna 
□□□a ooan raaaaa 
HHssnHHBEaanaa 
□as Baa 
□□sons ansa aaa 
□□□aa HHaa aoiaa 
HQOQcaaaciaQaaaan 
□qqq nans naaaa 
BQ0 tnasa naaaciB 
asm toms 
auanaaaaaaaaQ 
□□□□□ QHDH aaaa 
□BHBQ aaaa aaaa 
□□□□a yEiiuH uaau 


38 Leave the pier 
3* Acquire 
38 Ask on one's 
knees 

4 1 Had 

42 Lunch order 

43 Belgrade 
dweller 

44 in abeyance 

45 Sciences' 
partner 

4* Tooth 
4« Comfort 
so Probe 
S3 Some pads 
55 Accident 
mementos 
88 Serves a 
sentence 
so Byrnes of "77 
Sunset Strip" 
Cl Brown paint, 

e-B- 

ss Six-footer? 

53 Resort locale 

54 Newspaper 
section 

DOWN 

1 Lion's pride? 
s ITs hard to miss 

3 Respect . 

4 Nonsense 


s Simile center 
s Comic Kaplan 
7 Assuages 
s Picture with Its 
own frame 
SWheetbott 
holder 

10 King of comedy 

11 Part of a pair 

12 Sound of relief 

13 Scuff up 

14 It's hard to say 
is Fastens with a 

pop 

21 "I have no 

23 chJch'uan 

*4 Tail ends 
as Temptation for 
Atalanta 

27 1991 American 
Conference 
champs 
29 It's hard 
so Listing 
31 Sounds off 

33 Digital-watch 
readout Abbr. 

34 Postal letters 
37 Have a hunch 
40 1970 Jackson 5 

Ml 

44 Looking while 
lusting 


45 Waylay 

47 Time and 
again 

40 In unison 
ao Tots up 


81 Afternoon TV 
fare 

52 Lifetime 
achievement 
Oscar winner 
Deborah 


54 Mingo portrayer 

55 Puerto 

57 Play place 
so Take part ina 

biathlon 
eo Kipling novel 



pome by Harney EMm 

© New York Times Edited by Will SA 


B 

Tm 

Me 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home: And 
reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 
language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 am. knowing they’ll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with Aisa: 1 

To use these services, dial the AKST Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get all the 
help you need With these Access Numbers and your AB9T Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don't have an AT8ET Calling Card or you’d like more information on AESST global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right 




©1994 ABET 


ABET Access Numbers. 

How to call around the world. 

1. Using che chan below, Rnd the country you are calling from. 

2. Dial the corresponding ADS' Access Number. 

3. An AES' EngL«*-^3ealSngpperaiar or voice prompt will ask for the phoae number you wish to call or connect you to a 
customer service representative. 

To receive your free wallet card of ABITs Access Numbers, feist dial the acces number of 
the country you’re in and ask for Qistomer Service: 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 



Australia 

0014-881-011 

China, PRO** 

10611 

Guam 

01*672 


800-1111 

India* 

000-117 


001/601-10 

Japan* 

0039-111 

Korea 

009-11 


11* 

Malaysia* 


Ntw Zealand 

000-911 

Philippines* 

105-11. 

Saipan* 

235-2672: 

.Singapore 

aoo- 0111-111 

Sri Lanka 

430-430 

Taiwan* 

0060-10288-0 

Thailand* 

0019-991-1111 

EUROPE 

Armenia** 

6*14111 

Austria—* 


Belgium* 


Bulgaria 

00-1800-0010 

Croatia** 

— 1 

Chech Rep 

00-420-00101 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 



France 

19* -0011 

Germany 

01304010 

Greece* 


Hungary* 


Iceland's 

9994X11 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


Xrrluiyl 


Italy* 

172-1011 

rJechwuwirin* 


1 IrtmutifciA 

8*196 


0-800-0111 

Mater* 


Monaco* 

19*4)011 



Norway* 

800-190-11 

-Poland**** 


Portugal* 





1596042 

Slovakia 

00-42000101 

Spain 


Sweden* 


Switzerland* 

1554)0-11 

UJE. 


pCfianii^N 1 1 1 1 1 M ;7 1 . 1 UBa 

Bahrain 


Cyprus* 

080-900101 

land 


Kuwait 



426-801 

Saudi Arabia 

1-600-100 

Turkey* 



Argentina* 

lyj&ytevaml 

Belize* ' 

555 

Bolivia- 

0800-1111 

Bratfl 

0006010 


COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

Colombia 

mmrssm 

KfostaRtesfu 

114. 

Ecuador* 

119- 


190 

Guatemala* 

190 ' 

Guyana— 

165 


123 

-Mexico*** 


Nicaragua (Manama) 174 

Panama* 

109 

Pent* 

191- 


156 

Uruguay 


Venezuela** 

80011-120 


r ■ 1 


Bermuda* 


British Vl 


Cayman Islands 


Grenada* 

1-600672-2881. 

'Haiti* 


Jamaica** 



W k 1 1 ■ 

iSl HttuTVevis 

1600672-2881 

AFRICA 

Egypt* (Cairo) 

316-0000 

Gabon* 

OOa-OOI’ 

Gambia* 

00111 

Kenya.* 

0000-10 

Liberia 

797-797“ 

: Malawi** 

101-1992 


•AOT C lIHry Cud rex yn JV»Itd*T In *C n^curtc* AMT World Conwy SctyIcv 

H3 W t um py pcrartn'atewl ww ' ixn nwitt: Hwn70 wxumto SD/t Lengmia? 

lire* ■hjvV.t- . 4 k i i «itf ^ -ph u iwlnwr«tra**ilntrog lWbnmqsre 

/flkT World CMues* Sarke b jwWIc film and fcv 4 m: (M onk* in huU ahovr 


< OCT VMUGeu>ccrfii9vkv|Wisc4 apply V 
ffl»r UMDiraei*5cim NmibNe ftwi «U tfwtunmei hBMtahMv 

■PH* ph«»iniuiiril»1wi , liiifc»*tDf|4M»v-tvnl1brilj | initf 

"PuN* rforiui 1/11*11 » r*»w ivnJ fat dal in Dtal 0KV4KHII 1 1 

fnm ntere wanow IMefe 


nu tw reiBihk.- faun evm ptaeK' 
''GjOrnoffingiNify 

nalbML-fiun jl jnrei. 

* Await *xond Jbl ne 


Chfle OOfcd 312- 



O